-3

I have a list :

main = ['A','B','Bb','Ab','Ac','Bc','C','D']

I want to replace these following values in list main with the values provided here:

'A' - 23
'Ab' - 345
'Ac' - 57
'B' - 56
'Bb' - 82
'Bc' - 89

and replace the other strings with zeros

So the desired output is

new_main = [23,56,82,345,57,89,0,0]
  • Can you clarify how having either return [23,345,57] or return [56,82,89] would produce [23,56,82,345,57,89,0,0]? Do you mean to return the next value of the respective list? – MisterMiyagi Jul 10 '20 at 16:47
  • It looks to me there's some confusion in what the in statement does, as well as what returning a list does. From your input/output statements, I would suggest a lookup table, with either a dictionary or another construct. – sal Jul 10 '20 at 16:47
  • the order of list main is ['A','B','Bb','Ab','Ac','Bc','C','D'] hence it should return [23,56,82,345,57,89,0,0] – user12435585 Jul 10 '20 at 16:47
  • 1
    Take not that your example code has several syntax errors. It cannot produce any output. – MisterMiyagi Jul 10 '20 at 16:48
  • What output do you expect for, say, main = ['Ac', 'A', 'Ab', 'Ad', 'Bd', 'Bc', 'Bb', 'B']? – MisterMiyagi Jul 10 '20 at 16:58
1
main=['A','B','Bb','Ab','Ac','Bc','C','D']
dic = {'A' : 23,'B' : 56,'Bb' : 82,'Ab' : 345,'Ac' : 57,'Bc' : 89}

def replacer(key):
    if key in dic:
        return dic[key]
    else:
        return 0
ans = [replacer(key) for key in main] # gives [23, 56, 82, 345, 57, 89, 0, 0]

You could create a dictionary and then use list comprehension to replace the keys with the values.

You could replace the replacer function with the get method of dictionary as pointed out by @MisterMiyagi since it performs the same function.

ans = [dic.get(key, 0) for key in main]
  • Please include reason for downvoting my answer. Would really help me correct the code in that case. – Suraj Subramanian Jul 10 '20 at 16:53
  • 2
    Note that dict has a get method that already allows for a default. Instead of defining and using a custom replace(key) function, dic.get(key, 0) works out of the box. – MisterMiyagi Jul 10 '20 at 16:53
  • Thanks for letting me know that. I have corrected the code. – Suraj Subramanian Jul 10 '20 at 16:58
0

Making use of list comprehension:

lis=['A','B','Bb','Ab','Ac','Bc','C','D']
new=[int(num) if num.isdigit() else 0 for num in [x.replace('Bb', '82').replace('Ab', '345').replace('Ac', '57').replace('Bc', '89').replace('A', '23').replace('B', '56') for x in lis]]
new
>>[23, 56, 82, 345, 57, 89, 0, 0]
0

Here is a simple solution:

_A = (['A','Ab','Ac'], [23, 345, 57])
_B = (['B','Bb','Bc'], [56, 82, 89])

def a_applicable(element, index):
    if index == len(_A[0]):
        return False

    return _A[0][index] == element


def b_applicable(element, index):
    if index == len(_B[0]):
        return False

    return _B[0][index] == element


def _f(a):
    a_index = 0
    b_index = 0
    result = []
    for ai in a:
        if a_applicable(ai, a_index) is True:
            result.append(_A[1][a_index])
            a_index += 1
            continue

        if b_applicable(ai, b_index) is True:
            result.append(_B[1][b_index])
            b_index += 1
            continue

        result.append(0)
    return result

input_list = list(input().strip().split())
print(*_f(input_list))

Output:

A B Bb Ab Ac Bc C D
23 56 82 345 57 89 0 0
0

I would also think a dictionary in this case is the best option, because you want a particular string to correspond to a value:

main=['A','B','Bb','Ab','Ac','Bc','C','D']

conditions = {'A':23, 'Ab':345, 'Ac':57, 'B':56,
          'Bb':82, 'Bc':89}

result = []
def abc():
   for a in main:
       for key, value in conditions.items():
          if a == key:
             result.append(value)
          else:
             result.append(0)
   print(result)
abc()