8

Probably a trivial question, but I'm trying to get up to date with modern C# and I am overwhelmed with all the new features like pattern matching etc.

With C# 8, is there a new way to simplify the following common pattern, were I check a property for being non null and if so, store it in a var for use within the if scope? That is:

var item = _data.Item;
if (item != null)
{ 
    // use item
}

I could think of this:

if (_data.Item is var item && item != null)
{ 
    // use item
}

And this:

if (_data.Item is Item item)
{ 
    // use item
}

Between these, I'd still pick the 1st snippet.

  • 1
    You might want to look at docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/pattern-matching – Progman Jul 10 at 23:40
  • What's wrong with _data.Item is Item item? It will return true only if non-null, which seems to be exactly what you want. Beyond that, questions like this where there are many acceptable answers, and the choice of which one is subjective, are not suitable for SO, being both too broad and primarily opinion based. – Peter Duniho Jul 10 at 23:48
  • How are you going to "use item"? – Delphi.Boy Jul 10 at 23:49
  • @PeterDuniho I think it is subjective to define what is opinion based :) E.g., @GuruStron provided an excellent option I wasn't aware of: if (_data.Item is {} item) { ... }. – avo Jul 11 at 0:07
  • In this code if (_data.Item is var item && item != null) the check for null is not necessary, because it will never be null. – Legacy Code Jul 11 at 3:53
15

Also you can use empty property pattern:

if (_data.Item is {} item)
{ 
    // use item
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. – TheGeneral Jul 11 at 0:27
  • 2
    IMHO, this is actually very cool. I even can go deeper, liker this: if (data.Item is { Category: 42 } item) { /* here only if data.Item != null && data.Item.Category == 42 */ }. I thought this kind of pattern matching only works for switch. – avo Jul 11 at 5:46
  • 2
    This is the proper approach. It is ugly, but it's the best option. – Aluan Haddad Jul 11 at 8:09
  • 2
    @avo it seems that there is almost no overhead and it is just syntactic sugar for null check and assignment. – Guru Stron Jul 11 at 14:06
  • 1
    @avo was glad to help! – Guru Stron Jul 11 at 14:18
4

Null propagation.

var result = _data.Item?.UseItem()

or in a method

var result = UseItem(_data.Item?.Value ?? "some default value")
| improve this answer | |
  • not C# 8 feature – Roman Kalinchuk Jul 10 at 23:56
  • 3
    I would think that C# 8 is backwards compatible with C# 6 features... docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/whats-new/csharp-6 – Jeff Jul 11 at 0:00
  • 1
    it is :) still question was mostly about new added features if i undestood it right – Roman Kalinchuk Jul 11 at 0:03
  • 1
    This is a good one and I'm aware of it, but IMHO null propagation is good for a one-liner. If there is a whole scope to work with item, I'd rather use if { } and skip '.?' within that scope. – avo Jul 11 at 0:04
  • @RomanKalinchuk You are correct! I'll leave it up since OP didn't use it in the post. – Jeff Jul 11 at 0:05
1

This pattern, where myVariable may be located outside of the method

if (myVariable == null)
{
    myVariable = GetSomeFallbackValue();
}
return myVariable;

may be shorten as

return myVariable ?? (myVariable = GetSomeFallbackValue());

and the same with C# 8.0 new syntax

return myVariable ??= GetSomeFallbackValue();

The pattern is often used for lazy initialization in Property getter, and it's suitable for code written in expression form.

private MyClass myBackingField;

public MyClass MyProperty
{
    get => myBackingField ??= new MyClass();
    set => myBackingField = value;
}

The value for backing field will be instantiated on first call of the Property getter. Thus, the value of the MyProperty will never be null.

3 operations at once:

  • check for null
  • conditionally assign fall back value
  • and return (or use) the result
| improve this answer | |

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