82

itertools.permutations generates where its elements are treated as unique based on their position, not on their value. So basically I want to avoid duplicates like this:

>>> list(itertools.permutations([1, 1, 1]))
[(1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1)]

Filtering afterwards is not possible because the amount of permutations is too large in my case.

Does anybody know of a suitable algorithm for this?

Thank you very much!

EDIT:

What I basically want is the following:

x = itertools.product((0, 1, 'x'), repeat=X)
x = sorted(x, key=functools.partial(count_elements, elem='x'))

which is not possible because sorted creates a list and the output of itertools.product is too large.

Sorry, I should have described the actual problem.

5
  • What's too large? The TOTAL permutations or the UNIQUE permutations or both?
    – FogleBird
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:30
  • 4
    There is an even faster solution than the accepted answer (an implementation of Knuth's Algorithm L) given here
    – Gerrat
    Aug 22, 2014 at 13:20
  • You are looking for permutations of Multisets. See the answer by Bill Bell below. Jan 1, 2018 at 3:01
  • Did you try for x in permutation() set.add(x)? Nov 24, 2018 at 1:54
  • Maybe a better title for this question would be "distinct permutations". Better still, "distinct permutations of a list with duplicates".
    – Don Hatch
    Nov 10, 2019 at 6:15

20 Answers 20

61
class unique_element:
    def __init__(self,value,occurrences):
        self.value = value
        self.occurrences = occurrences

def perm_unique(elements):
    eset=set(elements)
    listunique = [unique_element(i,elements.count(i)) for i in eset]
    u=len(elements)
    return perm_unique_helper(listunique,[0]*u,u-1)

def perm_unique_helper(listunique,result_list,d):
    if d < 0:
        yield tuple(result_list)
    else:
        for i in listunique:
            if i.occurrences > 0:
                result_list[d]=i.value
                i.occurrences-=1
                for g in  perm_unique_helper(listunique,result_list,d-1):
                    yield g
                i.occurrences+=1




a = list(perm_unique([1,1,2]))
print(a)

result:

[(2, 1, 1), (1, 2, 1), (1, 1, 2)]

EDIT (how this works):

I rewrote the above program to be longer but more readable.

I usually have a hard time explaining how something works, but let me try. In order to understand how this works, you have to understand a similar but simpler program that would yield all permutations with repetitions.

def permutations_with_replacement(elements,n):
    return permutations_helper(elements,[0]*n,n-1)#this is generator

def permutations_helper(elements,result_list,d):
    if d<0:
        yield tuple(result_list)
    else:
        for i in elements:
            result_list[d]=i
            all_permutations = permutations_helper(elements,result_list,d-1)#this is generator
            for g in all_permutations:
                yield g

This program is obviously much simpler: d stands for depth in permutations_helper and has two functions. One function is the stopping condition of our recursive algorithm, and the other is for the result list that is passed around.

Instead of returning each result, we yield it. If there were no function/operator yield we would have to push the result in some queue at the point of the stopping condition. But this way, once the stopping condition is met, the result is propagated through all stacks up to the caller. That is the purpose of
for g in perm_unique_helper(listunique,result_list,d-1): yield g so each result is propagated up to caller.

Back to the original program: we have a list of unique elements. Before we can use each element, we have to check how many of them are still available to push onto result_list. Working with this program is very similar to permutations_with_replacement. The difference is that each element cannot be repeated more times than it is in perm_unique_helper.

7
  • 4
    I'm trying to understand how this works, but I'm stumped. Could you please provide some kind of commentary?
    – Nathan
    Sep 28, 2011 at 21:56
  • @Nathan I edited answer and refined code. Feel free to post extra questions you have.
    – Luka Rahne
    Sep 29, 2011 at 8:17
  • 1
    Nice piece of code. You re-implemented itertools.Counter, right? Feb 13, 2018 at 22:46
  • I am not familiar with itertools Counter. This code is more of an example and for educational purposes, but less for production, due to performance issues. If one needs better solution I would suggest iterative/non-recursing solution originating from Narayana Pandita and also explained by the Donad Knuth in the art of computer programming with possible python implementation at stackoverflow.com/a/12837695/429982
    – Luka Rahne
    Feb 14, 2018 at 15:29
  • I recreated this with itertools.Counter, but it seems your code is quicker :)
    – Roelant
    Oct 17, 2018 at 12:11
52

Because sometimes new questions are marked as duplicates and their authors are referred to this question it may be important to mention that sympy has an iterator for this purpose.

>>> from sympy.utilities.iterables import multiset_permutations
>>> list(multiset_permutations([1,1,1]))
[[1, 1, 1]]
>>> list(multiset_permutations([1,1,2]))
[[1, 1, 2], [1, 2, 1], [2, 1, 1]]
1
  • 8
    This is the only answer that explicitly identifies what the OP is really looking for (i.e. permutations of Multisets). Jan 1, 2018 at 2:27
27

This relies on the implementation detail that any permutation of a sorted iterable are in sorted order unless they are duplicates of prior permutations.

from itertools import permutations

def unique_permutations(iterable, r=None):
    previous = tuple()
    for p in permutations(sorted(iterable), r):
        if p > previous:
            previous = p
            yield p

for p in unique_permutations('cabcab', 2):
    print p

gives

('a', 'a')
('a', 'b')
('a', 'c')
('b', 'a')
('b', 'b')
('b', 'c')
('c', 'a')
('c', 'b')
('c', 'c')
4
  • works perfectly well but slower than the accepted solution. Thank you!
    – xyz-123
    Jun 9, 2011 at 6:49
  • This is not true in newer versions of Python. For instance, in Python 3.7.1, list(itertools.permutations([1,2,2], 3)) returns [(1, 2, 2), (1, 2, 2), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1)]. Jun 26, 2019 at 23:59
  • @KirkStrauser: You are correct. The statement "any permutation of a sorted iterable are in sorted order" wasn't even true of older versions of Python. I tested Python versions back through 2.7 and found your result accurate. Interestingly enough it doesn't invalidate the algorithm. It does produce permutations such that only max permutations at any point are original. Jul 5, 2019 at 13:52
  • @KirkStrauser: I must ammend. You are incorrect. I went to edit my answer and read more closely what I wrote. My statement had a qualifier that made it correct: "any permutation of a sorted iterable are in sorted order unless they are duplicates of prior permutations." Jul 5, 2019 at 13:55
18

Roughly as fast as Luka Rahne's answer, but shorter & simpler, IMHO.

def unique_permutations(elements):
    if len(elements) == 1:
        yield (elements[0],)
    else:
        unique_elements = set(elements)
        for first_element in unique_elements:
            remaining_elements = list(elements)
            remaining_elements.remove(first_element)
            for sub_permutation in unique_permutations(remaining_elements):
                yield (first_element,) + sub_permutation

>>> list(unique_permutations((1,2,3,1)))
[(1, 1, 2, 3), (1, 1, 3, 2), (1, 2, 1, 3), ... , (3, 1, 2, 1), (3, 2, 1, 1)]

It works recursively by setting the first element (iterating through all unique elements), and iterating through the permutations for all remaining elements.

Let's go through the unique_permutations of (1,2,3,1) to see how it works:

  • unique_elements are 1,2,3
  • Let's iterate through them: first_element starts with 1.
    • remaining_elements are [2,3,1] (ie. 1,2,3,1 minus the first 1)
    • We iterate (recursively) through the permutations of the remaining elements: (1, 2, 3), (1, 3, 2), (2, 1, 3), (2, 3, 1), (3, 1, 2), (3, 2, 1)
    • For each sub_permutation, we insert the first_element: (1,1,2,3), (1,1,3,2), ... and yield the result.
  • Now we iterate to first_element = 2, and do the same as above.
    • remaining_elements are [1,3,1] (ie. 1,2,3,1 minus the first 2)
    • We iterate through the permutations of the remaining elements: (1, 1, 3), (1, 3, 1), (3, 1, 1)
    • For each sub_permutation, we insert the first_element: (2, 1, 1, 3), (2, 1, 3, 1), (2, 3, 1, 1)... and yield the result.
  • Finally, we do the same with first_element = 3.
13

You could try using set:

>>> list(itertools.permutations(set([1,1,2,2])))
[(1, 2), (2, 1)]

The call to set removed duplicates

6
  • 10
    He might need list(set(itertools.permutations([1,1,2,2])))
    – Luka Rahne
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:05
  • 2
    Or list(itertools.permutations({1,1,2,2})) in Python 3+ or Python 2.7, due to the existence of set literals. Though if he's not using literal values, he'd just be using set() anyway. And @ralu: look at the question again, filtering afterwards would be costly.
    – JAB
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:08
  • 32
    set(permutations(somelist)) != permutations(set(somelist))
    – Luka Rahne
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:12
  • 1
    the problem with this is that I need the output to have the length of the input. E.g. list(itertools.permutations([1, 1, 0, 'x'])) but wihtout the duplicates where the ones are interchanged.
    – xyz-123
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:14
  • 2
    @JAB: hm, this takes a very long time for more than 12 values... what I actually want is something like itertools.product((0, 1, 'x'), repeat=X) but I need to process values with few 'x's first (sorted is not suitible because it's generating a list and using too much memory).
    – xyz-123
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:25
12

A naive approach might be to take the set of the permutations:

list(set(it.permutations([1, 1, 1])))
# [(1, 1, 1)]

However, this technique wastefully computes replicate permutations and discards them. A more efficient approach would be more_itertools.distinct_permutations, a third-party tool.

Code

import itertools as it

import more_itertools as mit


list(mit.distinct_permutations([1, 1, 1]))
# [(1, 1, 1)]

Performance

Using a larger iterable, we will compare the performances between the naive and third-party techniques.

iterable = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
len(list(it.permutations(iterable)))
# 720

%timeit -n 10000 list(set(it.permutations(iterable)))
# 10000 loops, best of 3: 111 µs per loop

%timeit -n 10000 list(mit.distinct_permutations(iterable))
# 10000 loops, best of 3: 16.7 µs per loop

We see more_itertools.distinct_permutations is an order of magnitude faster.


Details

From the source, a recursion algorithm (as seen in the accepted answer) is used to compute distinct permutations, thereby obviating wasteful computations. See the source code for more details.

1
  • Upvoted. list(mit.distinct_permutations([1]*12+[0]*12)) also turned out to be ~5.5 times faster than list(multiset_permutations([1]*12+[0]*12)) from @Bill Bell's answer.
    – Darkonaut
    Dec 14, 2019 at 14:34
10

This is my solution with 10 lines:

class Solution(object):
    def permute_unique(self, nums):
        perms = [[]]
        for n in nums:
            new_perm = []
            for perm in perms:
                for i in range(len(perm) + 1):
                    new_perm.append(perm[:i] + [n] + perm[i:])
                    # handle duplication
                    if i < len(perm) and perm[i] == n: break
            perms = new_perm
        return perms


if __name__ == '__main__':
    s = Solution()
    print s.permute_unique([1, 1, 1])
    print s.permute_unique([1, 2, 1])
    print s.permute_unique([1, 2, 3])

--- Result ----

[[1, 1, 1]]
[[1, 2, 1], [2, 1, 1], [1, 1, 2]]
[[3, 2, 1], [2, 3, 1], [2, 1, 3], [3, 1, 2], [1, 3, 2], [1, 2, 3]]
4
  • I like this solution
    – jef
    Oct 17, 2016 at 6:34
  • I'm glad you like this method Mar 6, 2017 at 4:22
  • Hi @LittleRoys. I used a slightly modified version of your code for a PR in more-itertools. Are you ok with that?
    – jferard
    May 10, 2018 at 10:39
  • 1
    I'm curious, does the class add any value? Why isn't this just a function?
    – Don Hatch
    Nov 14, 2019 at 20:25
3

Here is a recursive solution to the problem.

def permutation(num_array):
    res=[]
    if len(num_array) <= 1:
        return [num_array]
    for num in set(num_array):
        temp_array = num_array.copy()
        temp_array.remove(num)
        res += [[num] + perm for perm in permutation(temp_array)]
    return res

arr=[1,2,2]
print(permutation(arr))
0
3

To generate unique permutations of ["A","B","C","D"] I use the following:

from itertools import combinations,chain

l = ["A","B","C","D"]
combs = (combinations(l, r) for r in range(1, len(l) + 1))
list_combinations = list(chain.from_iterable(combs))

Which generates:

[('A',),
 ('B',),
 ('C',),
 ('D',),
 ('A', 'B'),
 ('A', 'C'),
 ('A', 'D'),
 ('B', 'C'),
 ('B', 'D'),
 ('C', 'D'),
 ('A', 'B', 'C'),
 ('A', 'B', 'D'),
 ('A', 'C', 'D'),
 ('B', 'C', 'D'),
 ('A', 'B', 'C', 'D')]

Notice, duplicates are not created (e.g. items in combination with D are not generated, as they already exist).

Example: This can then be used in generating terms of higher or lower order for OLS models via data in a Pandas dataframe.

import statsmodels.formula.api as smf
import pandas as pd

# create some data
pd_dataframe = pd.Dataframe(somedata)
response_column = "Y"

# generate combinations of column/variable names
l = [col for col in pd_dataframe.columns if col!=response_column]
combs = (combinations(l, r) for r in range(1, len(l) + 1))
list_combinations = list(chain.from_iterable(combs))

# generate OLS input string
formula_base = '{} ~ '.format(response_column)
list_for_ols = [":".join(list(item)) for item in list_combinations]
string_for_ols = formula_base + ' + '.join(list_for_ols)

Creates...

Y ~ A + B + C + D + A:B + A:C + A:D + B:C + B:D + C:D + A:B:C + A:B:D + A:C:D + B:C:D + A:B:C:D'

Which can then be piped to your OLS regression

model = smf.ols(string_for_ols, pd_dataframe).fit()
model.summary()
2

It sound like you are looking for itertools.combinations() docs.python.org

list(itertools.combinations([1, 1, 1],3))
[(1, 1, 1)]
2
  • 8
    No, combinations would have the same problem.
    – JAB
    Jun 8, 2011 at 20:13
  • only gives it in order, e.g [1, 2, 3] would produces [1, 2, 3] but not [3, 2, 1] or [2, 3, 1] etc
    – J.k
    Nov 12, 2017 at 13:32
2

The best solution to this problem I have seen uses Knuth's "Algorithm L" (as noted previously by Gerrat in the comments to the original post):
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12836385/how-can-i-interleave-or-create-unique-permutations-of-two-stings-without-recurs/12837695

Some timings:

Sorting [1]*12+[0]*12 (2,704,156 unique permutations):
Algorithm L → 2.43 s
Luke Rahne's solution → 8.56 s
scipy.multiset_permutations() → 16.8 s

1

Bumped into this question while looking for something myself !

Here's what I did:

def dont_repeat(x=[0,1,1,2]): # Pass a list
    from itertools import permutations as per
    uniq_set = set()
    for byt_grp in per(x, 4):
        if byt_grp not in uniq_set:
            yield byt_grp
            uniq_set.update([byt_grp])
    print uniq_set

for i in dont_repeat(): print i
(0, 1, 1, 2)
(0, 1, 2, 1)
(0, 2, 1, 1)
(1, 0, 1, 2)
(1, 0, 2, 1)
(1, 1, 0, 2)
(1, 1, 2, 0)
(1, 2, 0, 1)
(1, 2, 1, 0)
(2, 0, 1, 1)
(2, 1, 0, 1)
(2, 1, 1, 0)
set([(0, 1, 1, 2), (1, 0, 1, 2), (2, 1, 0, 1), (1, 2, 0, 1), (0, 1, 2, 1), (0, 2, 1, 1), (1, 1, 2, 0), (1, 2, 1, 0), (2, 1, 1, 0), (1, 0, 2, 1), (2, 0, 1, 1), (1, 1, 0, 2)])

Basically, make a set and keep adding to it. Better than making lists etc. that take too much memory.. Hope it helps the next person looking out :-) Comment out the set 'update' in the function to see the difference.

1
  • The , 4 should be removed so it will work on things of any length. Even with that fixed, this isn't a great solution. For one thing it stores all the items in memory at once, defeating some of the advantages of a generator. For another, it's still super inefficient in terms of time, in some cases where it should be instant. Try for i in dont_repeat([1]*20+[2]): print i; it will take forever.
    – Don Hatch
    Nov 10, 2019 at 5:47
1

You can make a function that uses collections.Counter to get unique items and their counts from the given sequence, and uses itertools.combinations to pick combinations of indices for each unique item in each recursive call, and map the indices back to a list when all indices are picked:

from collections import Counter
from itertools import combinations
def unique_permutations(seq):
    def index_permutations(counts, index_pool):
        if not counts:
            yield {}
            return
        (item, count), *rest = counts.items()
        rest = dict(rest)
        for indices in combinations(index_pool, count):
            mapping = dict.fromkeys(indices, item)
            for others in index_permutations(rest, index_pool.difference(indices)):
                yield {**mapping, **others}
    indices = set(range(len(seq)))
    for mapping in index_permutations(Counter(seq), indices):
        yield [mapping[i] for i in indices]

so that [''.join(i) for i in unique_permutations('moon')] returns:

['moon', 'mono', 'mnoo', 'omon', 'omno', 'nmoo', 'oomn', 'onmo', 'nomo', 'oonm', 'onom', 'noom']
1

This is my attempt without resorting to set / dict, as a generator using recursion, but using string as input. Output is also ordered in natural order:

def perm_helper(head: str, tail: str):
    if len(tail) == 0:
        yield head
    else:
        last_c = None
        for index, c in enumerate(tail):
            if last_c != c:
                last_c = c
                yield from perm_helper(
                    head + c, tail[:index] + tail[index + 1:]
                )


def perm_generator(word):
    yield from perm_helper("", sorted(word))

example:

from itertools import takewhile
word = "POOL"
list(takewhile(lambda w: w != word, (x for x in perm_generator(word))))
# output
# ['LOOP', 'LOPO', 'LPOO', 'OLOP', 'OLPO', 'OOLP', 'OOPL', 'OPLO', 'OPOL', 'PLOO', 'POLO']
1
ans=[]
def fn(a, size): 
    if (size == 1): 
        if a.copy() not in ans:
            ans.append(a.copy())
            return

    for i in range(size): 
        fn(a,size-1); 
        if size&1: 
            a[0], a[size-1] = a[size-1],a[0] 
        else: 
            a[i], a[size-1] = a[size-1],a[i]

https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/heaps-algorithm-for-generating-permutations/

0

Came across this the other day while working on a problem of my own. I like Luka Rahne's approach, but I thought that using the Counter class in the collections library seemed like a modest improvement. Here's my code:

def unique_permutations(elements):
    "Returns a list of lists; each sublist is a unique permutations of elements."
    ctr = collections.Counter(elements)

    # Base case with one element: just return the element
    if len(ctr.keys())==1 and ctr[ctr.keys()[0]] == 1:
        return [[ctr.keys()[0]]]

    perms = []

    # For each counter key, find the unique permutations of the set with
    # one member of that key removed, and append the key to the front of
    # each of those permutations.
    for k in ctr.keys():
        ctr_k = ctr.copy()
        ctr_k[k] -= 1
        if ctr_k[k]==0: 
            ctr_k.pop(k)
        perms_k = [[k] + p for p in unique_permutations(ctr_k)]
        perms.extend(perms_k)

    return perms

This code returns each permutation as a list. If you feed it a string, it'll give you a list of permutations where each one is a list of characters. If you want the output as a list of strings instead (for example, if you're a terrible person and you want to abuse my code to help you cheat in Scrabble), just do the following:

[''.join(perm) for perm in unique_permutations('abunchofletters')]
0

I came up with a very suitable implementation using itertools.product in this case (this is an implementation where you want all combinations

unique_perm_list = [''.join(p) for p in itertools.product(['0', '1'], repeat = X) if ''.join(p).count() == somenumber]

this is essentially a combination (n over k) with n = X and somenumber = k itertools.product() iterates from k = 0 to k = X subsequent filtering with count ensures that just the permutations with the right number of ones are cast into a list. you can easily see that it works when you calculate n over k and compare it to the len(unique_perm_list)

0

Adapted to remove recursion, use a dictionary and numba for high performance but not using yield/generator style so memory usage is not limited:

import numba

@numba.njit
def perm_unique_fast(elements): #memory usage too high for large permutations
    eset = set(elements)
    dictunique = dict()
    for i in eset: dictunique[i] = elements.count(i)
    result_list = numba.typed.List()
    u = len(elements)
    for _ in range(u): result_list.append(0)
    s = numba.typed.List()
    results = numba.typed.List()
    d = u
    while True:
        if d > 0:
            for i in dictunique:
                if dictunique[i] > 0: s.append((i, d - 1))
        i, d = s.pop()
        if d == -1:
            dictunique[i] += 1
            if len(s) == 0: break
            continue
        result_list[d] = i
        if d == 0: results.append(result_list[:])
        dictunique[i] -= 1
        s.append((i, -1))
    return results
import timeit
l = [2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6]
%timeit list(perm_unique(l))
#377 ms ± 26 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

ltyp = numba.typed.List()
for x in l: ltyp.append(x)
%timeit perm_unique_fast(ltyp)
#293 ms ± 3.37 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

assert list(sorted(perm_unique(l))) == list(sorted([tuple(x) for x in perm_unique_fast(ltyp)]))

About 30% faster but still suffers a bit due to list copying and management.

Alternatively without numba but still without recursion and using a generator to avoid memory issues:

def perm_unique_fast_gen(elements):
    eset = set(elements)
    dictunique = dict()
    for i in eset: dictunique[i] = elements.count(i)
    result_list = list() #numba.typed.List()
    u = len(elements)
    for _ in range(u): result_list.append(0)
    s = list()
    d = u
    while True:
        if d > 0:
            for i in dictunique:
                if dictunique[i] > 0: s.append((i, d - 1))
        i, d = s.pop()
        if d == -1:
            dictunique[i] += 1
            if len(s) == 0: break
            continue
        result_list[d] = i
        if d == 0: yield result_list
        dictunique[i] -= 1
        s.append((i, -1))
0

May be we can use set here to obtain unique permutations

import itertools
print('unique perms >> ', set(itertools.permutations(A)))
-1

What about

np.unique(itertools.permutations([1, 1, 1]))

The problem is the permutations are now rows of a Numpy array, thus using more memory, but you can cycle through them as before

perms = np.unique(itertools.permutations([1, 1, 1]))
for p in perms:
    print p

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