15

Let's suppose I have a class like that:

template <typename T>
struct S {
  int n = 1;
  S(T t) : n(t) {};
  S() = default;
};

Is it possible to change something so that it would be possible to instantiate S with no template arguments in case if I want to use the default constructor like that S s {};?

The best thing I came up with is to assign some bogus default value to the template argument so that it becomes optional:

#include <iostream>

struct default_ {};

template <typename T = default_>
struct S {
  int n = 1;
  S(T t) : n(t) {};
  S() = default;
};


int main() {
  S<int> s1 {10};
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s1.n << std::endl;
  S s2 {};
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s2.n << std::endl;
}

https://repl.it/repls/RegalCoolDeal

  • 1
    You can already use the default constructor, since you declared it default. Your question needs clarity. You could just default the template parameter to anything. Or use a partial template specialization. – super Jul 11 at 9:21
  • The question is clear and challenging. See my answer below ;) – Hack06 Jul 11 at 9:24
  • Why are you initializing the integer n with an arbitrary type? – jjramsey Jul 17 at 12:17
  • @jjramsey, it doesn't matter in this case. – Gill Bates Jul 17 at 17:43
13

If T is used only for the constructor, you don't need to template the whole class:

#include <iostream>

struct S {
  int n = 1;

  template <typename T>
  S(T t) : n(t) {};

  S() = default;
};

int main() {
  S s1 {10};
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s1.n << std::endl;
  S s2 {};
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s2.n << std::endl;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Indeed! Very good catch. – Gill Bates Jul 11 at 9:49
  • 2
    This is not allowing to compile the line S<int> s1 {10};, which was in the original question and part of the requirement IMHO. – Hack06 Jul 11 at 9:58
  • 2
    @Hack06. I don't see that requirement anywhere in the question. – Mad Physicist Jul 11 at 10:03
  • 1
    @MadPhysicist, it's up to you, but I don't take the question out of the context. I just pointed out the fact that others may have overlooked. – Hack06 Jul 11 at 10:06
9

You might specialize S for void and create a CTAD https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/class_template_argument_deduction

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
struct S {
  int n = 1;
  S(T t) : n(t) {}; // no default
};

template <>
struct S<void> {
  int n = 1;
  S() = default;  // only default
};

// CTAD calls to constructor S() will instantiate as S<void> 
template<typename... T> S() -> S<void>;   

int main() {
  S<int> s1 {10};
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s1.n << std::endl;
  S s2 {};  // here CTAD will be trigged
  std::cout << "Value:\n" << s2.n << std::endl;
}

A link to cppinsights may help understand what and where things are being instantiated: https://cppinsights.io/s/8f0f4bf6

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Thanks! This seems better to me. Just to note that CTAD requires C++17 to compile. – Hack06 Jul 11 at 10:36
  • Nice! Thank you very much. – Gill Bates Jul 11 at 12:02

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