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My program has got a MessageBox in the code. the first time I ran it it appeared it wasn't showing up and the program froze. I have spent hours reading through forums and I have tried everything. I minimized my form just before the MessageBox and it appears the dialogue appears behind the form. I tried this piece of code but nothing worked.

Application.NormalizeTopMosts; MessageBox(Handle,'Test','A message test',MB_SYSTEMMODAL or MB_SETFOREGROUND or MB_TOPMOST or MB_ICONHAND);

P.S.: I have another form in the program and it works fine on that form and I have ensured they both have the same settings

Edit:

I just realized that it was the OnCellDraw feature of my StringGrid that caused the message to be hidden. I managed to get it to work by making the StringGrid invisible and then visible again. The OnDrawCell has the foolowing code which displays booked days of the year using cells coloured in. I would like to know if there is a better way to make the message appear without making the stringgrid invisible. Without running the OnDrawCell, the MessageBox also works

procedure TfrmClient.stgYearPlanDrawCell(Sender: TObject; ACol, ARow: Integer;
  Rect: TRect; State: TGridDrawState);
var
  k, iMonth, iDay, iStart, iEnd, iSubtract : Integer;
begin
    case iYear of
      2020 :  begin
                iStart := 1;
                iEnd:= 12;
                iSubtract := 0;
              end;
      2021  : begin
                iStart := 13;
                iEnd:= 24;
                iSubtract := 12;
              end;
      2022  : begin
                iStart := 25;
                iEnd := 36;
                iSubtract := 24;
              end;
    end;
    for k := 1 to 31 do
      stgYearPlan.Cells[k,0] := IntToStr(k);

    for k := 1 to 12 do
      stgYearPlan.Cells[0,k] := ShortMonthNames[k];

    for iMonth := iStart to iEnd do
    begin
    for iDay := 1 to 31 do
     begin
          if ar2Booking[iDay,iMonth] = 'Y' then
          begin
            if (ACol = iDay) and (ARow = (iMonth-iSubtract)) then
            begin
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.Brush.Color := clBlack;
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.FillRect(Rect);
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.TextOut(Rect.Left,Rect.Top,stgYearPlan.Cells[ACol, ARow]);
            end;
          end;

          if ar2Booking[iDay,iMonth] = 'D' then
          begin
            if (ACol = iDay) and (ARow = (iMonth-iSubtract)) then
            begin
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.Brush.Color := clSilver;
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.FillRect(Rect);
              stgYearPlan.Canvas.TextOut(Rect.Left+2,Rect.Top+2,stgYearPlan.Cells[ACol, ARow]);
            end;
          end;
     end;
     end;
end;```


  • You say that you use the ShowMessage function, but your code is using the MessageBox function. Which is it? – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 at 15:38
  • Anyhow, you shouldn't be needing any tricks at all. ShowMessage('Hello, World!') should work perfectly, as should MessageBox(Handle, 'Hello, World!', 'My App', MB_ICONINFORMATION). Something is wrong with your app. Try to display a msg box in a new VCL app, to see that it works. Then remove one part at a time from your app until the problem disappears. – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 at 15:41
  • The most likely cause, I'd say (but I'm only guessing), is that your form has FormStyle = fsStayOnTop, you are using MessageBox (and not ShowMessage), and you are providing the wrong window handle (the first argument must be the handle of the form). Try removing fsStayOnTop from the form, using ShowMessage instead of MessageBox, or providing the correct handle (you can be explicit: Form1.Handle). – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 at 15:44
  • Sorry, I used both ShowMessage and MessageBox. I wanted to use ShowMessage but i tried both to try to get it to work @Andreas Rejibrand – JohnPienaar Jul 11 at 17:10
  • 6
    The problem is that you populate the string grid with data in its OnDrawCell handler. You are only supposed to draw on the canvas in this method; you shouldn't touch the data. When the grid needs to repaint, this method is called. You draw in the grid (OK), but you also change the data. Because of this, the grid realises that it needs to redraw itself again (because its data has changed!), so this method is called. You draw in the grid (OK), but you also change the data. Because of this, the grid realises that it needs to redraw itself again (because its data has changed), so this... – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 at 18:28
4

The problem is that you populate the string grid with data in its OnDrawCell handler.

You are only supposed to draw on the canvas in this method; you shouldn't touch the data.

When the grid needs to repaint, its OnDrawCell handler is called. You draw in the grid (that's OK), but you also change the data. Because of this, the grid realises that it needs to redraw itself again (because its data has changed!), so its OnDrawCell handler is called. You draw in the grid (that's OK), but you also change the data. Because of this, the grid realises that it needs to redraw itself again (because its data has changed!), so its OnDrawCell handler is called, ...

Well, I'll stop there.

Clearly, this causes an infinite sequence of repaints which will make your application busy repainting the grid.

You can see this phenomenon in action rather easily. Just create a new VCL application, drop a TStringGrid on the main form and add

procedure TForm1.StringGrid1DrawCell(Sender: TObject; ACol, ARow: Integer;
  Rect: TRect; State: TGridDrawState);
begin
  StringGrid1.Cells[3, 3] := Random(100).ToString;
end;

You'll see a constantly updating random number in the (3, 3) cell.

Being busy with painting the grid will have many consequences. For instance, in addition to the message box anomaly you discovered, you'll likely see your process maxing out a single "thread" of the CPU (if you have a quad-core HT CPU, say, you will use one thread fully, or 1/8 = 12.5% CPU).

| improve this answer | |
  • An an aside, the message box isn't actually hidden behind the form. It simply isn't displayed on screen until you press Alt. However, it still responds to the Esc and Enter keys. Google tells me this behaviour is not unheard of, but I still don't fully understand the precise mechanism behind it. BTW, I realised this when I tried to bring up the dialog's system menu using Alt+Space. That's a common trick to access a window hidden beneath some other window. Just open the system menu, choose "Move" and use the arrow keys to bring the window into visibility. – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 11 at 23:39

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