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Hi I'm wondering if there's a way to parse an entire HTML tag using JSoup? In my example pictures below, the five elements (4 images and 1 string) are all inside the "li" container. However, when you open the "li" tag, there are multiple nested containers. Is there a way to parse it so that I have access to all 5 elements contained in this "li" tag? I'm thinking of using getElementsMatchingOwnText("Collins") but that seems to only get me "span class="text text_14 mix-text_color7">Panorama". Any help would be appreciated, thanks! enter image description here enter image description here

enter image description here

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Yes, you can iterate over the children of your <li> tag using jsoup.

Here is a simplified version of the HTML in your screenshot, showing the 5 elements:

<li>
    <span class="foo"><img src="bar" class="img"></span>
    <span class="bar">Collins</span>
    <i class="baz1"><img src="baz1" class="img"></i>
    <i class="baz2"><img src="baz2" class="img"></i>
    <i class="baz3"><img src="baz3" class="img"></i>
</li>

Assuming you have selected this specific <li> tag in your document, you can use the following approach:

String html = "<li><span class=\"foo\"><img src=\"bar\" class=\"img\"></span><span class=\"bar\">Collins</span><i class=\"baz1\"><img src=\"baz1\" class=\"img\"></i><i class=\"baz2\"><img src=\"baz2\" class=\"img\"></i><i class=\"baz3\"><img src=\"baz3\" class=\"img\"></i></li>";

Document document = Jsoup.parse(html);

Element element = document.selectFirst("li");
element.children().forEach(child -> {
    // do your processing here - this is just an example:
    if (child.hasText()) {
        System.out.println(child.text());
    } else {
        System.out.println(child.html());
    }
});

The above code prints the following output:

<img src="bar" class="img">
Collins
<img src="baz1" class="img">
<img src="baz2" class="img">
<img src="baz3" class="img">

UPDATE

If the starting point is a URL, then you would need to start with this:

Document document = Jsoup.connect("https://www...").get();

Then the exercise is about identifying a unique way to find your specific element. So, if we update my earlier example, let's assume your web page is like this:

<html>
    <head>...</head>
    <body>
        <div>
            <ul class="vList_4">
 
                <li>
                    <span class="foo"><img src="bar" class="img"></span>
                    <span class="bar">Collins</span>
                    <i class="baz1"><img src="baz1" class="img"></i>
                    <i class="baz2"><img src="baz2" class="img"></i>
                    <i class="baz3"><img src="baz3" class="img"></i>
                </li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    </body
</html>

Here we have a class in a <ul> tag called vList_4. If that is a unique class name, we can use it to jump to that section of the HTML page (IDs are better than class names because they are guaranteed to be unique - but I did not see any ID names in your screenshot).

Now, instead of my previous selector:

Element element = document.selectFirst("li");

We can use this more specific selector:

Element element = document.selectFirst("ul.vList_4 li");

The same results will be printed as before.

So, it's all about you looking at the page structure and figuring out how to jump to the relevant section of the page.

See here for technical details describing how selectors are constructed.

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  • Hey thanks so much for the response! I'm wondering if there's another way to grab hold of the <li> tag without typing it all out and storing it into the html field, since the data could change?
    – Kevin
    Jul 12 '20 at 0:31
  • How you grab that tag depends on the wider context of your HTML page. You would need to show the overall structure of the page in your question, to get help with that. For example, is it the only <li> tag in the page? Is it contained inside another tag which can be uniquely identified, or otherwise selected? And so on... Jul 12 '20 at 0:34
  • Typically, the starting point is a URL, of course. Not a piece of text. Jul 12 '20 at 0:37
  • This <li> tag is nested inside another <li> tag haha, that's what's really confusing me, and there are are <li> tags in the larger <li> tag. I've posted a picture of it (3rd picture) above
    – Kevin
    Jul 12 '20 at 0:44
  • 1
    See updates in answer - it's all about you looking at the structure of the page, to find a path to the section you want to extract. Jul 12 '20 at 1:13

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