-1
#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int temp = 300;

    cout << "Address of variable temp:  " << (unsigned)&temp;
    return 0;
}

main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’: main.cpp:17:57: error: cast from ‘int*’ to ‘unsigned int’ loses precision [-fpermissive] cout << "Address of variable temp: " << (unsigned)&temp;

3

You convert a pointer to int to an unsigned int.

The problem is that an unsigned int is too little to contain all possible values of a pointer to int.

You can try with an unsigned long long that should be great enough

(unsigned long long)&temp;

You can check the dimension of the type with sizeof(), that return the number of bytes of a type/variable

With my platform (Linux amd64) from

std::cout << sizeof(&temp) << std::endl;
std::cout << sizeof(unsigned) << std::endl;

I get 8 (for sizeof(&temp)) and 4 (for sizeof(long)).

And, obviously, a 4 bytes variable can't represent all possible values of a 8 bytes variable.

From a different platform you can get different values.

| improve this answer | |
  • by the way, I have solved this by using std::intptr_t but your suggestion worked as well, Thank You. – AkashKumar.007 Jul 13 at 23:14
2

Not sure, why you are trying to cast it. But if you are trying to see the memory address of temp then you should do &temp.

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int temp = 300;

    cout << "Address of variable temp:  " << &temp;
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • On possible explanation for casting is that printing of a pointer may result in hexadecimal notation. The OP might find that disagreeable. – Fred Larson Jul 13 at 22:40
  • OK, I'll remove my post. – Geno C Jul 13 at 22:41
  • 2
    I don't think removal is necessary. This is a perfectly fine answer. – Fred Larson Jul 13 at 22:43
  • I want the output as an integer that's why I have used unsigned keyword, – AkashKumar.007 Jul 13 at 23:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.