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Imagine I have a list of key-words:

terms = ["dog","cat","fish"]

And I also have another list that contain longer strings of texts:

texts = ["I like my dog", "Hello world", "Random text"]

I now want that I have a code that basically goes through the list texts and checks if it contains any of the items in the list terms and it should return a list that contains if this item in texts had a match.

This is what the code should produce:

result = ["match","no match","no match"]
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Here is how you can use zip() and a list comprehension:

terms = ["dog","cat","fish"]

texts = ["I like my dog", "Hello world", "Random text"]

results = ["match" if a in b else "no match" for a,b in zip(terms,texts)]

print(results)

Output:

['match', 'no match', 'no match']

UPDATE: Turns out the zipping wasn't what the OP wanted.

terms = ["dog","cat","fish"]

texts = ["I like my dog", "Hello world", "Random text"]

results = ["match" if any(b in a for b in terms) else "no match" for a in texts]

print(results)

Output:

['match', 'no match', 'no match']
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    thats almost what I need, but if the order of the terms changes it does not work anymore. Meaning it should still find the "match" if the word "dog" is last in the term list. – paul_on_pc Jul 13 at 23:57
  • I would use set methods for simplicity. Unfortunately, I'm in the middle of cooking dinner and can't write up an example for an answer. – user10637953 Jul 13 at 23:59
  • I hope your dinner goes better than my own solutions to that question and I hope you might find some time later. :)) – paul_on_pc Jul 14 at 0:00
  • @paul_on_pc Updated. – Ann Zen Jul 14 at 0:01
  • LOL Thx. I say 'unfortunately' because I suspect someone else will jump all over this chance before I get back. – user10637953 Jul 14 at 0:01

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