140

How does the compiler fill values in char array[100] = {0};? What's the magic behind it?

I wanted to know how internally compiler initializes.

  • 1
    In C or C++? They are two separate questions. – Toby Speight Jan 10 '17 at 15:44
161

It's not magic.

The behavior of this code in C is described in section 6.7.8.21 of the C specification (online draft of C spec): for the elements that don't have a specified value, the compiler initializes pointers to NULL and arithmetic types to zero (and recursively applies this to aggregates).

The behavior of this code in C++ is described in section 8.5.1.7 of the C++ specification (online draft of C++ spec): the compiler aggregate-initializes the elements that don't have a specified value.

Also, note that in C++ (but not C), you can use an empty initializer list, causing the compiler to aggregate-initialize all of the elements of the array:

char array[100] = {};

As for what sort of code the compiler might generate when you do this, take a look at this question: Strange assembly from array 0-initialization

  • Do all C compilers do this? I was lead to believe only Visual Studio does this. – JFA Oct 10 '13 at 15:01
  • 1
    online draft of c++ specs broken, anyone has new link? – Behrooz Karjoo Mar 2 '17 at 14:35
35

Implementation is up to compiler developers.

If your question is "what will happen with such declaration" - compiler will set first array element to the value you've provided (0) and all others will be set to zero because it is a default value for omitted array elements.

  • I don't have a source, but I'm pretty sure that I read somewhere that there is no default value for array declarations; you get whatever garbage was already there. There's no sense in wasting time setting these values when you're likely to overwrite them anyway. – Ryan Fox Mar 10 '09 at 5:56
  • 10
    Ryan, if you don't set a value for the first element that the whole array is uninitialised and indeed contains garbage, but if you set a value for at least one element of it the whole array becomes initialised so unspecified elements get initialised implicitly to 0. – qrdl Mar 10 '09 at 6:05
  • 1
    For C++ an empty initializer list for a bounded array default-initializes all elements. – dalle Mar 10 '09 at 6:54
  • 2
    @NatanYellin Where did I say that this is undefined? Please read the full answer before commenting and downvoting. – qrdl Apr 2 '12 at 6:27
  • 1
    @qrdl You're right. I misunderstood your comment about the implementation. Unfortunately, I can't change my vote now. – Natan Yellin Apr 2 '12 at 9:06
27

If your compiler is GCC you can also use following syntax:

int array[256] = {[0 ... 255] = 0};

Please look at http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.1.2/gcc/Designated-Inits.html#Designated-Inits, and note that this is a compiler-specific feature.

  • Welcome! since you asked for Looking more such sorts of tricks, I had provided – lakshmanaraj Mar 10 '09 at 6:41
  • 1
    You certainly can do this if you choose, but there are obvious disadvantages to relying on compiler-specific extensions like this one. – Dan Olson Mar 10 '09 at 9:59
  • @Dan Olson his question himself is asking about compiler specific and hence posted this. If you feel it is useless, i will delete. – lakshmanaraj Mar 10 '09 at 10:02
  • 5
    It's not useless, it's interesting. The caveat just deserves to be noted. – Dan Olson Mar 10 '09 at 10:08
  • 2
    It's stuff like this keeps me coming back to SO and reading more than the top few answers... – timday Mar 10 '09 at 13:30
17

It depends where you put this initialisation.

If the array is static as in

char array[100] = {0};

int main(void)
{
...
}

then it is the compiler that reserves the 100 0 bytes in the data segement of the program. In this case you could have omitted the initialiser.

If your array is auto, then it is another story.

int foo(void)
{
char array[100] = {0};
...
}

In this case at every call of the function foo you will have a hidden memset.

The code above is equivalent to

int foo(void)
{ 
char array[100];

memset(array, 0, sizeof(array));
....
}

and if you omit the initializer your array will contain random data (the data of the stack).

If your local array is declared static like in

int foo(void)
{ 
static char array[100] = {0};
...
}

then it is technically the same case as the first one.

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