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I would like to make an alias called Ls which prints out the current directory and file name when I try to list a specific file

unix> ls a.txt
unix> a.txt -> print out

I want it to print out the directory name too:

unix> /hier1/hier2/hier3/a.txt

When I do 'ls -d $PWD/a.txt'
it prints out

unix> /hier1/hier2/hier3/a.txt

When I make an alias of the above

alias Ls 'ls -d $PWD', it prints out the as below with a space.

unix> Ls a.txt
unix> /hier1/hier2/hier3 a.txt 

How do I get the below print without the space and with a slash as below:

unix> Ls a.txt
unix> /hier1/hier2/hier3/a.txt -> THIS IS WHAT I WANT

4
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    Please start with the tour and read How to Ask. Then, read the descriptions of the tags that you applied to get an idea why your question in and of itself is flawed. Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 21:23
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    Wrong site. You're looking for Unix & Linux instead. This site is for programming related questions, not general computer or OS support.
    – Ken White
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 21:30
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    I think you'd be better off writing a script to do this than trying to do this with an alias. Additionally, writing a script should be on topic for this site.
    – jamesdlin
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 22:05
  • yes, write a script, or declare your script as a function in .bashrc or one of the other . files that bash sources. You have to trick an alias to work with a changeable argument, and when you decide, "oh I need one more feature to be really happy", then you need to write a function anyway. (Where do people keep getting the idea that aliases are the first line of solutions?! ;-)! ) . Good luck.
    – shellter
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

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You are better off making a function. Go into your ~/.bashrc file and create the function as such with the export command:

function Ls(){
    p="$PWD" 
    out="${p}/${1}"
    echo $out
}

Then save and quit :wq, and type in:

source ~/.bashrc 

And the command should be ready to go

If you are using zsh, then add:

if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
  . ~/.bashrc
fi

to the ~/.zshrc file.

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alias Ls="echo -n $PWD/; ls $1"

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