6

What is the best way to clone objects in raku? I know the clone method exists, but It does not seem to work with nested objects.

For example, in this script:

#!/usr/bin/env perl6

class Group {
    has Int @!group = Array[Int].new;

    method add-item(Int $int) {
        @!group.push($int);
    }

    method print {
        say @!group;
    }
}

class GroupOfGroups {
    has Group @!multi-group = Array[Group].new;

    method add-group(Group $group) {
        @!multi-group.push($group);
    }

    method print {
        for ^@!multi-group.elems -> $i {
            @!multi-group[$i].print;
        }
    }
}

my $group = Group.new;
$group.add-item(1);
$group.add-item(2);
$group.add-item(3);

my $group-of-groups = GroupOfGroups.new;
$group-of-groups.add-group($group.clone);
$group.add-item(4);
$group.add-item(5);
$group.add-item(6);

$group-of-groups.add-group($group.clone);

$group-of-groups.print;

The output is:

[1 2 3 4 5 6]
[1 2 3 4 5 6]

But I was expecting it to be:

[1 2 3]
[1 2 3 4 5 6]
8

I wouldn't use anything other than clone to clone objects. clone is a proto method defined by Mu, but it's up to its subtypes to implement its behaviour in this case, as cloning the object does clone the array attributes, but not in the way you want. As such, you can write your own clone multis that behave like you expect:

# Group
multi method clone(::?CLASS:D: --> ::?CLASS:D) {
    my ::?CLASS:D $clone .= new;
    $clone.add-item: .clone for @!group;
    $clone
}

# GroupOfGroups
multi method clone(::?CLASS:D: --> ::?CLASS:D) {
    my ::?CLASS:D $clone .= new;
    $clone.add-group: .clone for @!multi-group;
    $clone
}

::?CLASS here is a symbol that, when used in classes, is an alias for the class itself, with :D restricting the type to instances only.

7
  • What does the ::?CLASS:D: before the arrow mean? Why the extra colon at the end? If I remove that trailing colon it does not clone the object. But, on the other hand, If I remove the whole ::?CLASS:D: it still works. – Julio Jul 15 '20 at 11:33
  • 1
    When a type is placed with a colon after that at the start of a method's signature, that types the method's invocant. The method doesn't work without it because if you remove the colon, it expects there to be an instance of the class passed as the first argument, so the multi doesn't match. – Kaiepi Jul 15 '20 at 12:22
  • Thanks for the clarification. So, is there any difference between multi method clone(::?CLASS:D: --> ::?CLASS:D) and multi method clone( --> ::?CLASS:D) Are both equivalent? – Julio Jul 15 '20 at 14:56
  • @Julio the :D part of (::?CLASS:D: …) is declaring that it is defined. That is it has to be an instance instead of the type itself. – Brad Gilbert Jul 15 '20 at 20:30
  • 1
    @Julio the signature ( --> ::?CLASS:D) is equivalent to (Any_: --> ::?CLASS:D). Kaiepi's signature is —to me— a bit overkill, but this is Raku, and TIMTOWTDI. To be honest, you could also use just method clone {…} because presumably the only thing that will call that method is a member of the class it's defined in, and since you're writing the method, you know and can control what it returns. – user0721090601 Jul 15 '20 at 22:33
4

Hi @julio a careful reading of the docs led me to this ... works like a charm:

method clone { nextwith :foo(@!foo.clone), :bar(%!bar.clone), |%_  }

(this also helped me to understand the rational behind “restricted” language help for deep cloning)

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