145

By default logging.Formatter('%(asctime)s') prints with the following format:

2011-06-09 10:54:40,638

where 638 is the millisecond. I need to change the comma to a dot:

2011-06-09 10:54:40.638

To format the time I can use:

logging.Formatter(fmt='%(asctime)s',datestr=date_format_str)

however the documentation doesn't specify how to format milliseconds. I've found this SO question which talks about microseconds, but a) I would prefer milliseconds and b) the following doesn't work on Python 2.6 (which I'm working on) due to the %f:

logging.Formatter(fmt='%(asctime)s',datefmt='%Y-%m-%d,%H:%M:%S.%f')
  • 1
    Maybe changing the locale could help? – pajton Jun 9 '11 at 9:33
  • 1
    @ pajton - in the following link it says "Locale information is not used by asctime()" - docs.python.org/library/time.html#time.asctime – Jonathan Jun 9 '11 at 9:35
  • %f doesn't work on python 2.7.9 or 3.5.1 either – Antony Hatchkins Aug 23 '16 at 16:49
  • 3
    Good conversation here. I came here because logging claims its default time format follows ISO 8601. It doesn't. It uses space, not "T" to separate time and comma for fractional seconds, not decimal point. How could they be so wrong? – L S Sep 10 '16 at 14:58
68

Please note Craig McDaniel's solution is clearly better.


logging.Formatter's formatTime method looks like this:

def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
    ct = self.converter(record.created)
    if datefmt:
        s = time.strftime(datefmt, ct)
    else:
        t = time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", ct)
        s = "%s,%03d" % (t, record.msecs)
    return s

Notice the comma in "%s,%03d". This can not be fixed by specifying a datefmt because ct is a time.struct_time and these objects do not record milliseconds.

If we change the definition of ct to make it a datetime object instead of a struct_time, then (at least with modern versions of Python) we can call ct.strftime and then we can use %f to format microseconds:

import logging
import datetime as dt

class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    converter=dt.datetime.fromtimestamp
    def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
        ct = self.converter(record.created)
        if datefmt:
            s = ct.strftime(datefmt)
        else:
            t = ct.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")
            s = "%s,%03d" % (t, record.msecs)
        return s

logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)
logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

console = logging.StreamHandler()
logger.addHandler(console)

formatter = MyFormatter(fmt='%(asctime)s %(message)s',datefmt='%Y-%m-%d,%H:%M:%S.%f')
console.setFormatter(formatter)

logger.debug('Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz.')
# 2011-06-09,07:12:36.553554 Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz.

Or, to get milliseconds, change the comma to a decimal point, and omit the datefmt argument:

class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    converter=dt.datetime.fromtimestamp
    def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
        ct = self.converter(record.created)
        if datefmt:
            s = ct.strftime(datefmt)
        else:
            t = ct.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S")
            s = "%s.%03d" % (t, record.msecs)
        return s

...
formatter = MyFormatter(fmt='%(asctime)s %(message)s')
...
logger.debug('Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz.')
# 2011-06-09 08:14:38.343 Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz.
  • 1
    so %f would actually give microseconds, not milliseconds, right? – Jonathan Jun 26 '11 at 15:43
  • @Jonathan: oops, you are right, %f gives microseconds. I suppose the easiest way to get milliseconds is to change the comma to a decimal point (see edit above). – unutbu Jun 26 '11 at 17:11
  • 2
    I actually think this is the best answer due to the fact that it gets you right back to being able to use STANDARD formatting options. I actually wanted microseconds, and this was the only option that could do it! – trumpetlicks Sep 25 '18 at 14:08
  • Thanks. This answer gives an easy solution to get microseconds. – Yongwei Wu Jun 23 '19 at 7:50
297

This should work too:

logging.Formatter(fmt='%(asctime)s.%(msecs)03d',datefmt='%Y-%m-%d,%H:%M:%S')
  • 12
    Thanks: Here are the docs for these: docs.python.org/2/library/logging.html#logrecord-attributes docs.python.org/3/library/logging.html#logrecord-attributes .. Is there a way to still include the timezone (%z)? ... ISO8601 format times in Python logs (, -> .) would be great. – Wes Turner Jun 22 '15 at 4:50
  • 17
    This solution is handicapped, because if you have %z or %Z in your datefmt you want that to appear AFTER the msecs, not before. – wim Apr 27 '17 at 21:01
  • 1
    And also if you are using a 12 hour clock which has AM or PM – DollarAkshay Feb 5 '18 at 14:14
  • @wim it's a workaround, but use UTC rather than local time by doing logging.Formatter.converter = time.gmtime then you don't need to use %z or %Z. Alternatively you could probably change the default_msec_format attribute of your logging.Formatter object to %s,%03d%z or %s,%03d%Z – Mark Mar 14 '19 at 0:09
  • @wim as a follow up to my previous comment (couldn't edit anymore...), here is what I've done: from time import gmtime - # Use UTC rather than local date/time - logging.Formatter.converter = gmtime - logging.basicConfig(datefmt='%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S', format='%(name)s | %(asctime)s.%(msecs)03dZ | %(message)s', level=log_level) – Mark Mar 14 '19 at 0:38
16

Adding msecs was the better option, Thanks. Here is my amendment using this with Python 3.5.3 in Blender

import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG, format='%(asctime)s.%(msecs)03d %(levelname)s:\t%(message)s', datefmt='%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')
log = logging.getLogger(__name__)
log.info("Logging Info")
log.debug("Logging Debug")
  • 1
    By far the simplest and cleanest option. Not sure why you're getting the logger when you can just call logging.info(msg) etc, but the format is exactly what I was looking for. Anyone else looking for all the usable attributes can look here: docs.python.org/3.6/library/logging.html#logrecord-attributes – naphier Apr 17 '19 at 3:49
  • Hmmm interesting point, thanks for comment it is food for thought for sure. Ya I probably just added it as a lesson in what's going on there too, and to make sure it's there and because I've asked multiple things so it doesn't need multiple calls to parent (via '.') to fetch it. If you called .info or .debug again I would maybe save those directly again as you suggest to save a reference look up cycle. [let info = logging.info] – Master James Nov 1 '19 at 6:48
  • this really helps, thanks a bunch. – Jason S Nov 6 '19 at 17:13
  • Thanks for saying Jason. Sometimes there is a simpler way to see the world, don't be afraid to try and discover that truth in many if not any/every situation. – Master James Nov 8 '19 at 7:11
12

The simplest way I found was to override default_msec_format:

formatter = logging.Formatter('%(asctime)s')
formatter.default_msec_format = '%s.%03d'
  • 1
    Interesting, thanks. But this didn't work for me in Python 2.7. It may only work in Python 3.x for some value of x. – nealmcb Oct 16 '17 at 5:28
  • 1
    @nealmcb this isn't available until Python 3.3 per the docs – Mark Mar 13 '19 at 23:58
4

After instantiating a Formatter I usually set formatter.converter = gmtime. So in order for @unutbu's answer to work in this case you'll need:

class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
        ct = self.converter(record.created)
        if datefmt:
            s = time.strftime(datefmt, ct)
        else:
            t = time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", ct)
            s = "%s.%03d" % (t, record.msecs)
        return s
2

A simple expansion that doesn't require the datetime module and isn't handicapped like some other solutions is to use simple string replacement like so:

import logging
import time

class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
    ct = self.converter(record.created)
    if datefmt:
        if "%F" in datefmt:
            msec = "%03d" % record.msecs
            datefmt = datefmt.replace("%F", msec)
        s = time.strftime(datefmt, ct)
    else:
        t = time.strftime("%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", ct)
        s = "%s,%03d" % (t, record.msecs)
    return s

This way a date format can be written however you want, even allowing for region differences, by using %F for milliseconds. For example:

log = logging.getLogger(__name__)
log.setLevel(logging.INFO)

sh = logging.StreamHandler()
log.addHandler(sh)

fm = MyFormatter(fmt='%(asctime)s-%(levelname)s-%(message)s',datefmt='%H:%M:%S.%F')
sh.setFormatter(fm)

log.info("Foo, Bar, Baz")
# 03:26:33.757-INFO-Foo, Bar, Baz
1

If you are using arrow or if you don't mind using arrow. You can substitute python's time formatting for arrow's one.

import logging

from arrow.arrow import Arrow


class ArrowTimeFormatter(logging.Formatter):

    def formatTime(self, record, datefmt=None):
        arrow_time = Arrow.fromtimestamp(record.created)

        if datefmt:
            arrow_time = arrow_time.format(datefmt)

        return str(arrow_time)


logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

default_handler = logging.StreamHandler()
default_handler.setFormatter(ArrowTimeFormatter(
    fmt='%(asctime)s',
    datefmt='YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss.SSS'
))

logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
logger.addHandler(default_handler)

Now you can use all of arrow's time formatting in datefmt attribute.

1

As of now the following works perfectly with python 3 .

         logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG,
                     format='%(asctime)s %(levelname)-8s %(message)s',
                     datefmt='%Y/%m/%d %H:%M:%S.%03d',
                     filename=self.log_filepath,
                     filemode='w')

gives the following output

2020/01/11 18:51:19.011 INFO

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