3

In my ASP.NET Core 3.1 api, I limit the maximum request size to 10 Mb:

Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
    .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
    {
        webBuilder.ConfigureKestrel(k =>
        {       
            k.Limits.MaxRequestBodySize = 1024 * 1024 * 10;    
        });
        webBuilder.UseStartup<Startup>();
    });

When a request is larger than 10 Mb, kestrel simply closes the connection without returning any response.

How can I return a meaningful response when the request size exceeds the limit?

2 Answers 2

9

When a request is larger than 10 Mb, kestrel simply closes the connection without returning any response.

Kestrel does return a 413 response, but the client is not always able to read it. When Kestrel enforces a MaxRequestBodySize for HTTP/1.1 connections, it immediately closes the underlying TCP socket after responding with the 413 response. By the time this happens, the client has already committed to sending a response body over the configured limit. There's no way for the client to back out at this point.

The client may be unable observe the 413 response because it is still attempting to upload the too-large request body after the server has fully closed the socket resulting in connection reset errors that are observed by the client before it can read the response.

The other answer's approach of using custom middleware to respond with the 413 can be reasonable, because it still prevents potentially expensive app logic from having to deal with processing large requests by pre-emptively responding with the 413 without immediately closing the socket giving time for the client to observe the 413 without running into any connection reset errors.

However, there are a couple of problems with the other answer's implementation. The biggest problem is using if (context.Request.ContentLength > 10_000_000) to check if the request body is too large. HttpContext.Request.ContentLength can be null, and when it is context.Request.ContentLength > 10_000_000 will always return false. Not every request includes a Content-Length​ header up front. To support limiting the size of chunked and HTTP/2 requests which may not include this header, we have to wrap HttpContext.Request.Body​ and count the size of every read to make sure it doesn't exceed the limit.

const long RequestSizeLimit = 10_000_000;

static Task Write413Response(HttpContext context)
{
    if (context.Response.HasStarted)
    {
        // The status code has already been sent and cannot be changed. 
        // However, rethrowing will prevent a successful chunk terminator.
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    context.Response.StatusCode = StatusCodes.Status413PayloadTooLarge;
    context.Response.Headers["Connection"] = "close";
    return context.Response.WriteAsync("Payload Too Large");
}

app.Use(async (context, next) =>
{
    if (context.Request.ContentLength > RequestSizeLimit)
    {
        // The client sent a Content-Length header over the limit.
        await Write413Response(context);
    }
    else if (context.Request.ContentLength is null)
    {
         // There was no Content-Length header. The request body could be any size.
        var orignalRequestBody = context.Request.Body;

        try
        {
            context.Request.Body = new SizeLimitedStream(context.Request.Body, RequestSizeLimit);
            await next(context);
        }
        catch (PayloadTooLargeException)
        {
            await Write413Response(context);
            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            context.Request.Body = orignalRequestBody;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        // The client sent a Content-Length header under the limit.
        // Kestrel enforces the accuracy of the Content-Length header.
        await next(context);
    }
});

I also don't recommend completely disabling Kestrel's MaxRequestBodySize limit by setting it to null. It should be more than the RequestSizeLimit enforced by the middleware so Kestrel doesn't close the socket immediately after the middleware responds with a 413 status code, but Kestrel probably shouldn't allow the client to send an unbounded amount of data as part of the request body even if it is just being drained.

Instead, I would just increase MaxRequestBodySize to something like double the lower middleware-enforced limit. Kestrel will only drain for up to 5 seconds after middleware exits before closing the socket no matter the size limit, so you could argue that with correctly written middleware, Kestrel's server-enforced request size limit is unnecessary, but this also mitigates any possible bugs in the middleware.

builder.WebHost.ConfigureKestrel(kestrelOptions =>
{
    // In this case, where RequestSizeLimit is 10 MB this is unnessary
    // because Kestrel's default limit is already 30 MB.
    options.Limits.MaxRequestBodySize = RequestSizeLimit * 2;
});

Here's the implementation of SizeLimitedStream used by the middleware which copied from ASP.NET Core's new request decompression middleware but modified to throw a custom Exception type that cannot be mixed up with other Exceptions thrown by the next() middleware:

// Copied from https://github.com/dotnet/aspnetcore/blob/597413644dec9fb34bcce580cea9629a96747600/src/Middleware/RequestDecompression/src/SizeLimitedStream.cs
// Added PayloadTooLargeException
// Licensed to the .NET Foundation under one or more agreements.
// The .NET Foundation licenses this file to you under the MIT license.

internal sealed class PayloadTooLargeException : IOException
{
    public PayloadTooLargeException() : base("Payload Too Large") { }
}

internal sealed class SizeLimitedStream : Stream
{
    private readonly Stream _innerStream;
    private readonly long? _sizeLimit;

    private long _totalBytesRead;

    public SizeLimitedStream(Stream innerStream, long? sizeLimit)
    {
        if (innerStream is null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(innerStream));
        }

        _innerStream = innerStream;
        _sizeLimit = sizeLimit;
    }

    public override bool CanRead => _innerStream.CanRead;

    public override bool CanSeek => _innerStream.CanSeek;

    public override bool CanWrite => _innerStream.CanWrite;

    public override long Length => _innerStream.Length;

    public override long Position
    {
        get
        {
            return _innerStream.Position;
        }
        set
        {
            _innerStream.Position = value;
        }
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        _innerStream.Flush();
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        var bytesRead = _innerStream.Read(buffer, offset, count);

        _totalBytesRead += bytesRead;
        if (_totalBytesRead > _sizeLimit)
        {
            throw new PayloadTooLargeException();
        }

        return bytesRead;
    }

    public override long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
    {
        return _innerStream.Seek(offset, origin);
    }

    public override void SetLength(long value)
    {
        _innerStream.SetLength(value);
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        _innerStream.Write(buffer, offset, count);
    }

    public override Task<int> ReadAsync(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        return ReadAsync(buffer.AsMemory(offset, count), cancellationToken).AsTask();
    }

    public override async ValueTask<int> ReadAsync(Memory<byte> buffer, CancellationToken cancellationToken = default)
    {
        var bytesRead = await _innerStream.ReadAsync(buffer, cancellationToken);

        _totalBytesRead += bytesRead;
        if (_totalBytesRead > _sizeLimit)
        {
            throw new PayloadTooLargeException();
        }

        return bytesRead;
    }
}
-3

For ASP.NET Core 6.0:

  1. Disable MaxRequestBodySize

    webBuilder.ConfigureKestrel((ctx, options) =>
    {
        options.Limits.MaxRequestBodySize = null;
    });
    
  2. Use custom middleware:

    app.Use(async (context, next) =>
    {
        if (context.Request.ContentLength > 10_000_000)
        {
            context.Response.StatusCode = StatusCodes.Status413PayloadTooLarge;
            await context.Response.WriteAsync("Payload Too Large");
            return;
        }
    
        await next.Invoke();
    });
    
3
  • This is insecure because Request.ContentLength can be null for requests with non-empty bodies. This will still let through requests that are over 10MB. See github.com/dotnet/aspnetcore/issues/43080.
    – halter73
    Commented Aug 5, 2022 at 18:30
  • thanks. however, maybe kestrel implement it inside would be better than custom stream and middleware
    – Yuan
    Commented Aug 9, 2022 at 7:06
  • Removing request body size is insecure. If you want to handle body size on your own, it's going to be much more involved that what you posted here. For example you'll have to close the connection when you've read the maximum number of allowed bytes, and the connection is still trying to send you the body. Content length is not guarantied to be present. There's content-encoding chunked, and multipart/form-data upload modes. In short - don't disable MaxRequestBodySize. Commented Jul 25, 2023 at 8:36

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