20

I'm having some trouble with the React useState hook. I have a todolist with a checkbox button and I want to update the 'done' property to 'true' that has the same id as the id of the 'clicked' checkbox button. If I console.log my 'toggleDone' function it returns the right id. But I have no idea how I can update the right property.

The current state:

const App = () => {

  const [state, setState] = useState({
    todos: 
    [
        {
          id: 1,
          title: 'take out trash',
          done: false
        },
        {
          id: 2,
          title: 'wife to dinner',
          done: false
        },
        {
          id: 3,
          title: 'make react app',
          done: false
        },
    ]
  })

  const toggleDone = (id) => {
    console.log(id);
}

  return (
    <div className="App">
        <Todos todos={state.todos} toggleDone={toggleDone}/>
    </div>
  );
}

The updated state I want:

const App = () => {

  const [state, setState] = useState({
    todos: 
    [
        {
          id: 1,
          title: 'take out trash',
          done: false
        },
        {
          id: 2,
          title: 'wife to dinner',
          done: false
        },
        {
          id: 3,
          title: 'make react app',
          done: true // if I checked this checkbox.
        },
    ]
  })
4
  • It would help if you provide how you are trying to set the state.
    – tsfahmad
    Jul 15, 2020 at 15:48
  • You need to call setState() with the modified state. Have you tried something? If so, what was the result? If you are struggling with how to even start, check out the map() function. Jul 15, 2020 at 15:48
  • Does this answer your question? Whats the best way to update an object in an array in ReactJS? Jul 15, 2020 at 15:51
  • Also, with hooks, there's no need to nest the array inside an object. You can call useState multiple times to manage different state values separately. Jul 15, 2020 at 15:52

7 Answers 7

43

You can safely use javascript's array map functionality since that will not modify existing state, which react does not like, and it returns a new array. The process is to loop over the state's array and find the correct id. Update the done boolean. Then set state with the updated list.

const toggleDone = (id) => {
  console.log(id);

  // loop over the todos list and find the provided id.
  let updatedList = state.todos.map(item => 
    {
      if (item.id == id){
        return {...item, done: !item.done}; //gets everything that was already in item, and updates "done"
      }
      return item; // else return unmodified item 
    });

  setState({todos: updatedList}); // set state to new object with updated list
}

Edit: updated the code to toggle item.done instead of setting it to true.

3
  • 1
    I want to point out something in the answer @bravemaster posted. They spread the state with {...state, todos: [...state.todos]} which is good practice. With my solution, if you were to include anything other than todos in the state, it would be lost in the setState operation (it works fine now since all you have in state is the todos object). The way to keep all other state and update todos at the same time would be setState({...state, todos: updatedList});
    – D. Smith
    Jul 16, 2020 at 15:11
  • Create answer. I have been using this pattern. But I have a question about the cost. Using the map loop imposes a linear cost on this pattern making it not effective in large arrays. Is there another pattern that makes use of the array's index feature?
    – spirit
    Oct 18, 2023 at 10:53
  • 1
    In this case the state todos is an array, so the linear search is an O(n) operation. I don't know of any other specific patterns for this case, but maybe there are other things we can try. If we assume that the id's are incremental as in the example, taking the first and last as boundaries we can implement a binary search, or I think the easier route is to convert the todos array to an object where the id's are keys, and we can jump right to the one we need to modify. Either way, remember that we need to make a copy and not modify the original state, which the map function also does for us.
    – D. Smith
    Oct 22, 2023 at 14:24
9

You need to use the spread operator like so:

const toggleDone = (id) => {
    let newState = [...state];
    newState[index].done = true;
    setState(newState])
}
5
  • 5
  • @EmileBergeron is creating a copy of the state first in newState Jul 11, 2022 at 13:40
  • 1
    @FacundoColombier it's only a shallow copy. The objects inside the array are the same as in the original state. Jul 11, 2022 at 15:03
  • with the spread operator [...state] is actually making a copy, not linked to the original, so no state is being modified "anti-pattern" Jul 11, 2022 at 23:44
  • Emile is correct here. [...state] will only make a shallow copy. You have to make a second copy like: newState[index] = {... newState[index], done: true}
    – JohnFlux
    Oct 25, 2022 at 21:08
9

D. Smith's answer is great, but could be refactored to be made more declarative like so..

const toggleDone = (id) => {
 console.log(id);
 setState(state => {
     // loop over the todos list and find the provided id.
     return state.todos.map(item => {
         //gets everything that was already in item, and updates "done" 
         //else returns unmodified item
         return item.id === id ? {...item, done: !item.done} : item
     })
 }); // set state to new object with updated list
}
1
  • The problem here is that after, instead of state being an object with a todos property which contains an array, state would contain the array directly. Instead, you could use the spread syntax in your return statement, like return {...state, todos: state.todos.map(. Oct 5, 2022 at 18:50
6

Something similar to D. Smith's answer but a little more concise:

const toggleDone = (id) => {

  setState(prevState => {
            // Loop over your list
            return prevState.map((item) => {
                // Check for the item with the specified id and update it
                return item.id === id ? {...item, done: !item.done} : item
            })
        })
}
2
  • This seems to be the same as Sam Kingston's answer. Jul 11, 2022 at 15:17
  • if you want to be concise, you don't need the return at all.: setState( prevState => prevState.map(item => item.id ? { ...item, done: !item.done} ? item ) )
    – JohnFlux
    Oct 25, 2022 at 21:10
4
const toggleDone = (id) => {
    console.log(id);
    // copy old state
    const newState = {...state, todos: [...state.todos]};
    // change value
    const matchingIndex = newState.todos.findIndex((item) => item.id == id);
    if (matchingIndex !== -1) {
       newState.todos[matchingIndex] = {
           ...newState.todos[matchingIndex], 
           done: !newState.todos[matchingIndex].done 
       }
    }
    // set new state
    setState(newState);
}
0
2

All the great answers but I would do it like this

setState(prevState => {
    ...prevState,
    todos: [...prevState.todos, newObj]
})

This will safely update the state safely. Also the data integrity will be kept. This will also solve the data consistency at the time of update.

if you want to do any condition do like this

setState(prevState => {
    if(condition){
        return {
            ...prevState,
            todos: [...prevState.todos, newObj]
        }
    }else{
        return prevState
    }
})
1
  • 1
    where i will check the condition e.g update a nested item when condition is true other wise same Sep 1, 2021 at 6:43
-1

I would create just the todos array using useState instead of another state, the key is creating a copy of the todos array, updating that, and setting it as the new array. Here is a working example: https://codesandbox.io/s/competent-bogdan-kn22e?file=/src/App.js

const App = () => {
  const [todos, setTodos] = useState([
    {
      id: 1,
      title: "take out trash",
      done: false
    },
    {
      id: 2,
      title: "wife to dinner",
      done: false
    },
    {
      id: 3,
      title: "make react app",
      done: false
    }
  ]);

  const toggleDone = (e, item) => {
    const indexToUpdate = todos.findIndex((todo) => todo.id === item.id);
    const updatedTodos = [...todos]; // creates a copy of the array

    updatedTodos[indexToUpdate].done = !item.done;
    setTodos(updatedTodos);
  };
1
  • You have the same issue as the first reply. You need to create a copy like: updatedTodos[indexToUpdate].done = {...item, done: !item.done;}
    – JohnFlux
    Oct 25, 2022 at 21:10

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