1

I have a matrix, X, and wish to delete columns based upon values in two different lists named "starts" and "lengths". Values in the first list are in increasing order, with each denoting the index of the starting column in X to delete. The corresponding value in "lengths" indicates how many columns to delete from that point forward, including the starting value itself. A simple example:

import numpy as np
X=np.random.randint(5, size=(3, 20))

starts=[2,9,16]
lengths=[3,4,2]

So, I want to delete columns 2-5, 9-13, and 16-18 of X. In other words, I want my result to be the same as

X[:,[0,1,6,7,8,14,15,19]]

What is the most efficient means of accomplishing this?

3 Answers 3

2

This should work. The time complexity is O(number of rows * number of columns). (The inner for loop that iterates over starts will run only upto number of columns in that row.). I don't think you can improve time complexity beyond this.

def delete_columns(matrix, starts, lengths):
    # New matrix with columns removed
    new_matrix = []
    # Iterate over all rows.
    for row in matrix:
        new_row = []
        col_index = 0
        # Number of columns in current row
        column_count = len(row)
        # Iterate over given starts
        for start_index in range(len(starts)):
            start_col = starts[start_index]
            # Add columns which are not present in starts to new matrix
            while col_index < min(column_count, start_col):
                new_row.append(row[col_index])
                col_index += 1

            # Reset column index to column pointed by starts
            col_index = start_col + lengths[start_index] + 1
            if col_index >= column_count:
                break

        # Handles empty starts and last few columns to be added
        while col_index < column_count:
            new_row.append(row[col_index])
            col_index += 1

        # Add row to new matrix
        new_matrix.append(new_row)
    return new_matrix


matrix = [list(range(0, 20))]
starts=[2,9,16]
lengths=[3,4,2]
print(delete_columns(matrix, starts, lengths))

Output:

[[0, 1, 6, 7, 8, 14, 15, 19]]
3
  • Thanks. I just realized I could also approach this from the perspective of sets and will add a solution below. Even though the syntax below is shorter, I'm not sure how python works with sets in a way that would make it faster than what you've proposed.
    – fishbacp
    Jul 15, 2020 at 19:09
  • 1
    @fishbacp Saw your code. I don't think using set has any advantage over the above solution (In fact, it only complicates). Because, for constructing the set, you will have to iterate over all the elements of the row (which is what I'm doing above, so no improvement). And also, you are adding an overhead of converting the set back to list. So what the above solution achieves in 1 iteration, you take 2 or more. (for each row)
    – Sabareesh
    Jul 15, 2020 at 19:25
  • Thanks so much, I suspected something like that might be the case.
    – fishbacp
    Jul 15, 2020 at 19:34
1

Another approach which just came to mind.

import numpy as np

num_times=20
X=np.random.randint(5, size=(3, num_times))

starts=[2,9,16]
lengths=[3,4,2]

T=[set(np.arange(starts[i],starts[i]+lengths[i]+1,1)) for i in 
range(len(starts))]
to_remove=set()
for s in T:
    to_remove=to_remove.union(s)

U=set(np.arange(0,num_times))
to_keep=list(U.difference(to_remove))

Y=X[:,to_keep] #The desired matrix
1

A colleague provided me another succinct way of doing it:

import numpy as np

num_times=20
X=np.random.randint(5, size=(3, num_times))

starts=[2,9,16]
lengths=[3,4,2]

cols = list(range(X.shape[1]))

remove = []
    for i, s in enumerate(starts):
    remove += range(s, s+lengths[i])

saved_cols = list(set(cols).difference(set(remove)))

Y=X[:,saved_cols]

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