2

I am new to C, so question may be quite silly.

I am writing socket server that operates data sent from clients. When it gets connection it creates thread that will work with the request.

Also it defines signal handlers. When SIGUSR1 is received it prints debug info to the logfile. The question is: what happens to threads when signal handling function is running?

If threads continue running their jobs, is there a way to freeze them while debugging handler is working?

I tried to find an answer in manpages for pthreads(7) but had not understood this moment. Sorry for possible incorrect terminology.

2 Answers 2

3

When SIGUSR1 is received it prints debug info to the logfile. The question is: what happens to threads when signal handling function is running?

One of the threads (usually it's the main thread on Linux - but this isn't guaranteed or portable assumption) in the process handles the signal while others continue to run1.

If threads continue running their jobs, is there a way to freeze them while debugging handler is working?

There's no straight-forward way to achieve this. You could implement a mechanism such as, the thread that handles the SIGUSR1 informs other threads to wait (e.g. with a conditional variable) and then once the signal is processed, it could inform other threads to continue. But I wouldn't recommend this because a signal handler should do as small as functionality as possible. Having complex functionality in a signal handler is generally considered bad. You should instead redesign such that other threads don't have to stop (what's the issue if other threads continue while debug info is logged?).

1 The usual way to deal with this is to have dedicated thread that handles signals. i.e. block the signals you're interested in and create a thread (before creating other threads) that handles those signals. pthread_sigmask(3) has an example of how to do it.

-

3
  • The reason for such strange requirement is simple: handler writes debug information about running threads to the logfile. For most cases, threads lives for a very short time. And this debugging mechanism with very high probability will not go to the production. It is necessary to understand the process only on the stage of development. Jul 16, 2020 at 12:03
  • You can have a dedicated thread that handles SIGUSR1 (this is needed in any case - see the link in the question). When SIGUSR1 arrives, this thread that simply pauses (and unpauses) all the other threads - like in this answer. That way, the log writing is taken outside the signal handler context.
    – P.P
    Jul 16, 2020 at 15:53
  • In addition, (1) you need to decide what to do when further SIGUSR1 signals arrives before processing (i.e. log writes) is complete for the previous one. Usually you'd want to ignore further SIGUSR1's (2) what to do when other signals arrive (e.g. SIGINT or SIGTERM) which may have different handlers. (2) may not be an issue if you're bothered by them (e.g. if SIGTERM arrives, you may let the process die - default disposition).
    – P.P
    Jul 16, 2020 at 15:53
1

Some intro to threads and signals (signal(7))

  • Signal Disposition is per-process

The signal disposition is a per-process attribute: in a multithreaded application, the disposition of a particular signal is the same for all threads.

  • Signal may be process-directed or thread-directed

Process-directed Signals: A process-directed signal is one that is targeted at (and thus pending for) the process as a whole. A process-directed signal may be delivered to any one of the threads that do not currently have the signal blocked. If more than one of the threads has the signal unblocked, then the kernel chooses an arbitrary thread to which to deliver the signal.

Thread-directed Signals: A thread-directed signal is one that is targeted at a specific thread. The set will consist of the union of the set of pending process-directed signals and the set of signals pending for the calling thread.

  • Asynchronous and Synchronous Signal Handling

You can configure your program to tell how to deal with signals. You can ignore them (few can't be ignored), register a signal handler which will be invoked when that specific signal is received (asynchronous), or block it to deal with it later (synchronous).

Coming to your case,

"The question is: what happens to threads when signal handling function is running?"

The signal is delivered once to any thread that is configured to receive it. The thread, which is asynchronously handling the signal, stops whatever it is doing and jumps to the configured signal handler. The flow of the execution in the remaining threads is unaffected.

If threads continue running their jobs, is there a way to freeze them while debugging handler is working?

There is no standard way of doing this. You need to build your own mechanism for enabling this.

To research further, some clarity is required regarding where the debug handler is executed. In each thread or in main() or in a specific thread?

Edit

Assuming main() implements the logging functionality, below tries to implement the base minimal for the same. Comments are added which enables to walk through code and understand the implementation.

#define THREAD_MAX_COUNT 100

#include <pthread.h>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <sys/signalfd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int debug;
sigset_t debug_mask;
pthread_t main_tid;

void* thread_func(void* th_data)
{
    /* .... */

    for ( ; ; ) {

        if (debug) {    // If debug procedure starts
            printf("Freezing %d\n", *((int*) th_data));

            pthread_kill(main_tid, SIGRTMIN);  // Notify the main thread about the thread's freeze.
            int signo;
            sigwait(&debug_mask, &signo);  // Wait till logging is done. main() will signal once it is done. 

            printf("Resuming %d\n", *((int*) th_data));
        }

        /* ... */
    }

    return NULL;
}

int main() {

    /* Block SIGINT SIGRTMIN*/

    sigset_t sigmask;
    sigemptyset(&sigmask);
    sigaddset(&sigmask, SIGINT);
    sigaddset(&sigmask, SIGRTMIN);

    pthread_sigmask(SIG_BLOCK, &sigmask, NULL);

    /* Set debug variables */

    debug = 0;
    sigemptyset(&debug_mask);
    sigaddset(&debug_mask, SIGRTMIN);
    main_tid = pthread_self();

    /* Get signalfd for SIGINT */

    int sigfd = signalfd(-1, &sigmask, 0);
    struct signalfd_siginfo sigbuf;

    /* Select variable initializations */

    fd_set rd_set, tr_set;
    FD_ZERO(&rd_set);
    FD_SET(sigfd, &rd_set);

    int td_count = 0;
    pthread_t tids[THREAD_MAX_COUNT];

    for ( ; ; ) {
        /* Wait for signal */
        tr_set = rd_set;

        select(sigfd + 1, &tr_set, NULL, NULL, NULL);

        if (FD_ISSET(sigfd, &tr_set)) {
            /* Read the pending signal */
            read(sigfd, &sigbuf, sizeof(sigbuf));

            /* Start logging */
            debug = 1;

            int signo;
            for (int count = 0; count < td_count; count++) {
                /* Wait for all threads to freeze */
                sigwait(&debug_mask, &signo);
            }

            printf("Logging...\n");
            sleep(3);

            /* End logging and resume threads */
            debug = 0;

            for (int count = 0; count < td_count; count++)
                pthread_kill(tids[count], SIGRTMIN);

            /* Note below code is for testing purpose; Creates new thread on each interruption */
            int* td_data = malloc(sizeof(int));
            *td_data = td_count;

            pthread_create(tids + td_count, NULL, thread_func, td_data);

            td_count++;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Terminal Session:

$ gcc SO.c -lpthread 
$ ./a.out 
^CLogging...
^CFreezing 0
Logging...
Resuming 0
^CFreezing 0
Freezing 1
Logging...
Resuming 0
Resuming 1
^CFreezing 0
Freezing 1
Freezing 2
Logging...
Resuming 1
Resuming 0
Resuming 2
^CFreezing 2
Freezing 3
Freezing 1
Freezing 0
Logging...
Resuming 1
Resuming 3
Resuming 2
Resuming 0
^CFreezing 1
Freezing 4
Freezing 3
Freezing 0
Freezing 2
Logging...
Resuming 1
Resuming 2
Resuming 0
Resuming 4
Resuming 3
^CFreezing 3
Freezing 0
Freezing 4
Freezing 2
Freezing 5
Freezing 1
Logging...
Resuming 0
Resuming 1
Resuming 2
Resuming 5
Resuming 3
Resuming 4
^\Quit (core dumped)
5
  • handler is registered in main() as follows signal(SIGUSR1, info_handler); Jul 16, 2020 at 11:59
  • @AntonZakharov It wont matter in which thread you executed that. Since all the process will be having the same signal disposition for that particular Signal. The question is which thread you wanted to execute that signal handler ? main or every thread or some specific thread registered for debug info. Jul 16, 2020 at 12:56
  • as I answered to P.P, I want to collect debugging information in the main thread since most the time it is waiting for connections, therefore is idle. And debugging information corresponds to the running threads that work on the requests. As I understand, the problem has no simple solution. May be it is better to reach the goal in the other way. Jul 16, 2020 at 13:33
  • @AntonZakharov No, you don't need to change your implementation ideas. In some projects, it may demand such kind of implementation. Accept the challenge and find the hack around. I coded one such hack around. It was interesting working on the challenge. Thanks :) Jul 16, 2020 at 16:11
  • 1
    Thank you very much for time spent for the question! Jul 17, 2020 at 7:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.