For example: man(1), find(3), updatedb(2)? What do the numbers in parentheses (Brit. "brackets") mean?

up vote 388 down vote accepted

It's the section that the man page for the command is assigned to.

These are split as

  1. General commands
  2. System calls
  3. C library functions
  4. Special files (usually devices, those found in /dev) and drivers
  5. File formats and conventions
  6. Games and screensavers
  7. Miscellanea
  8. System administration commands and daemons

Original descriptions of each section can be seen in the Unix Programmer's Manual (page ii).

  • 77
    Key bit of info: to access a man page given as "foo(5)": man 5 foo – Steve Bennett Sep 17 '15 at 5:16
  • 1
    Here's a link that isn't broken – Alex W Sep 19 '17 at 17:57
  • 1
    That link had the same list, but was a v5 version of said manual. I've taken the liberty of updating the answer's link with one to The Internet Archive which had the v7 version the original answer seemed to link to (based on the URL). – Jeroen Oct 7 '17 at 14:28

The section the command is documented in the manual. The list of sections is documented on man's manual. For example:

man 1 man
man 3 find

This is useful for when similar or exactly equal commands exist on different sections

  • 84
    And in the "olden days" the section numbers corresponded to the binder that the hardcopy version of the man page was in. – Darron Sep 29 '08 at 1:43

The reason why the section numbers are significant is that many years ago when disk space was more of an issue than it is now the sections could be installed individually.

Many systems only had 1 and 8 installed for instance. These days people tend to look the commands up on google instead.

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    I rather look the commands up on google because I find the presentation and explanation of the man pages really distracting – winklerrr Apr 4 '17 at 10:03

Note also that on other unixes, the method of specifying the section differs. On solaris, for example, it is:

man -s 1 man

It indicates the section of the man pages the command is found in. The -s switch on the man command can be used to limit a search to certain sections.

When you view a man page, the top left gives the name of the section, e.g.:

User Commands printf(1)
Standard C Library Functions printf(3C)

So if you are trying to look up C functions and don't want to accidentally see a page for a user command that shares the same name, you would do 'man -s 3C ...'

Wikipedia details about Manual Sections:

  1. General commands
  2. System calls
  3. Library functions, covering in particular the C standard library
  4. Special files (usually devices, those found in /dev) and drivers
  5. File formats and conventions
  6. Games and screensavers
  7. Miscellanea
  8. System administration commands and daemons
  • 4
    This answer has become useless; the link which wasn't also in the earlier accepted answer broke and was edited out, now there is nothing added by this answer at all. – Ben Voigt Jun 3 '15 at 19:03

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