I am porting an application from Tru64 to Linux and it uses PID_MAX defined in limits.h. Linux doesn't have that define. How do I find PID_MAX in c without reading /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max by hand? Is there a library?

  • AFAIK, PID_MAX in Linux is UINT_MAX, which depends on the cpu – Geoffrey Jun 9 '11 at 14:11
  • UINT_MAX does not depend on the CPU in Linux. It's always 0x7fffffff. – R.. Jun 9 '11 at 14:23
  • Erm, I meant INT_MAX. pid_t is of course a signed int, not unsigned, but I mentally copied what gnif wrote. :-) – R.. Jun 9 '11 at 14:29
up vote 74 down vote accepted

32768 by default, you can read the value on your system in /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max.

And you can set the value higher (up to 222 = 4,194,304 on 32-bit machines) with:

echo 4194303 > /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max

Read more here:

http://www.cs.wisc.edu/condor/condorg/linux_scalability.html (via archive.org)

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    Ok that was not what I wanted to do but I ended up reading the value from the file. I guess there is no other way. – Alexander Stolz Jun 15 '11 at 9:57
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    The Condor link in your answer went 404, unfortunately. I've replaced it with a link through archive.org, of course it'd be better if you know of a current version of the document. – derobert Nov 18 '13 at 18:04
  • Is the limit shown in that pid_max file inclusive? Can getpid() return that very number or is the maximum that number minus one? (i.e. by default, can a process have PID 32768 or is the maximum 32767?) – Alexis Wilke Sep 14 at 21:01

The maximum value of the PID in Linux is configurable. You can access it trough /proc/sys/kernel/pid_max file. This file (new in Linux 2.5) specifies the value at which PIDs wrap around (i.e., the value in this file is one greater than the maximum PID). The default value for this file, 32768, results in the same range of PIDs as on earlier kernels. The value in this file can be set to any value up to 2^22 (PID_MAX_LIMIT, approximately 4 million).

From the programming perspective, you have to use pid_t type to work with process ID. You can even access it`s min/max values using integer traits. Here is an example of doing that using C++ and Boost on Linux 2.6.X running on x86_64 platform:

$ cat test.cpp 
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/integer_traits.hpp>

using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    cout << "pid_t max = " << boost::integer_traits<pid_t>::const_max << endl;
}

$ ./test 
pid_t max = 2147483647
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    Question is tagged C, not C++. The second half of your answer does not apply to C and is not possible in C. – R.. Jun 9 '11 at 14:22
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    @R: This is just an example, if I knew how to get compile-time traits for pid_t in C, I'd write C. I am sure there is some equivalent with macros. – user405725 Jun 9 '11 at 14:24
  • sth using sizeof(pid_t) * 8 or (pid_t)-1 i guess.... – yuyichao Nov 15 '12 at 5:43
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    @bfontaine it would be more like pow(2, 8 * sizeof(pid_t)). (not a perfect solution, but I wanted to clear up the glaring error with raising 8 to the number bytes, which is barely even related to the desired value) – MickLH Jan 22 '16 at 18:15
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    @craig65535 getpid is guaranteed not to return an error – Mason Dec 5 '17 at 14:48

From the proc(5) man page:

/proc/sys/kernel/pid_max (since Linux 2.5.34)

This file specifies the value at which PIDs wrap around (i.e., the value in this file is one greater than the maximum PID). PIDs greater than this value are not allocated; thus, the value in this file also acts as a system-wide limit on the total number of processes and threads. The default value for this file, 32768, results in the same range of PIDs as on earlier kernels. On 32-bit platforms, 32768 is the maximum value for pid_max. On 64-bit systems, pid_max can be set to any value up to 2^22 (PID_MAX_LIMIT, approximately 4 million).

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