14
#iddiv span {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 190px;
}
.myclass {
    width:10px;
}

Then I have

<div id="iddiv">
    <span>hello:</span> 
    <span class="myclass">yeah</span> <br/>
</div>

I would like the first span's width to be 190px, and second's to be 10px. But both are 190px: why it's not overriding the width propoerty?

EDIT: Thanks for your responses. What about unsetting width? I don't want 10px width, just default width as if it was undefined

1
  • Could you post it on jsFiddle so we can take a better look at it? :) – user142019 Jun 9 '11 at 15:29
11

Because id+selector (#iddiv span) is more specific than a class. Either

#iddiv span.myclass

or

#iddiv .myclass

should work for this case.

Learn more about CSS specificity here or by Googling it.

1
  • What about unsetting width? I don't want 10px width, just default width as if it was undefined – de3 Jun 9 '11 at 16:01
31

You could always use the !important flag to override:

.myclass {
    width: 10px !important;
}
1
5

CSS applies styles according to the specificity of the selectors

#iddiv span is more specific than myclass. Changing it to #iddiv .myclass should fix the issue for you.

Here's an article that goes more in depth about this : http://htmldog.com/guides/cssadvanced/specificity/

2

Remember to use the keyword, !important, which functions to overwrite parent rules.

Also you can define your "myclass" in the following way:

#iddiv span.myclass {
    width:10px;
}
1

It's not working because the first style is more specific.

To fix it, make sure you target the second span more directly, like this

#iddiv span.myclass

http://jsfiddle.net/jasongennaro/5fe9A/

1

First of all, I'd suggest you properly target your selectors, as others are suggesting.

But when all else fails, you can use !important.

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