4

I'm trying to figure out how Auth::attempt() works. It doesn't return any error but it doesn't work either, just returns false.

I have tried to define the table name, I tried to add guards but I'm not sure how it works.

According to Laravel documentation, if I'm not mistaken, I should add a guard for each authentication (I need authentication with different tables).

https://laravel.com/docs/7.x/authentication#introduction

That's how I defined a new guard: (I'm not sure if it has something to do with my issue)

'guards' => [
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'users',
    ],
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'guest',
    ],
    'api' => [
        'driver' => 'token',
        'provider' => 'users',
        'hash' => false,
    ],
],

My question is how can I authenticate users retrieving data from the table I want using Auth::attempt() or should I use my own method instead?

I'm new to Laravel so it's a little bit confusing.

2 Answers 2

5

One definite error is, that you can't have two guards with the same name.

The next error might be, that you didn't add the provider 'guest', but that can only be guessed.

I would go about it like this:

  1. Give your second web provider another name.
  2. Make sure your first web auth guard is working as expected again
  3. Go about implementing the second web auth guard

As an example your auth.php might look something like this:

'guards' => [
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'users',
    ],
    'guest' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'guest',
    ],
    'api' => [
        'driver' => 'token',
        'provider' => 'users',
        'hash' => false,
    ],
],
'providers' => [
    'users' => [
        'driver' => 'eloquent',
        'model' => App\Models\User::class,
    ],
    'guest' => [
        'driver' => 'eloquent',
        'model' => App\Models\Guest::class,
    ],
]

You would have to define the model Guest as well, of course.

Then you could do something like:

Auth::guard('web')->attempt($credentials)
// or
Auth::guard('guest')->attempt($credentials)

Something to think about

Sometimes you think you need different tables for authentication, but in reality it might be a much easier approach to work with one basic user table and auth guard and then use other tables to connect the user to further data and roles, for example.

8
  • Thank you for your explanation and advice. Your solution worked but now it returns false and I'm sure the field password has the correct hash. Where the method attempt gets the data from? Fom the model Guest ?
    – NewUser2
    Jul 17, 2020 at 13:44
  • If I change ` Auth::guard('guest')->attempt($credentials)` to ` Auth::guard('guestt')->attempt($credentials)` it gives me an error, which means the guard is working but it doesn't seem to be authenticating. I checked email and password.
    – NewUser2
    Jul 17, 2020 at 13:49
  • 1
    I would suggest you read the documentation and the solution below and try to figure out where your error really happens. For example I think you have to include the trait Authenticatable in your new Model, but as you see there is too much guess work involved at the moment. At least for me ;)
    – wschopohl
    Jul 17, 2020 at 15:00
  • 1
    Maybe start by copying the supplied User Model to a Guest Model and only change the class name. Make sure your corresponding table is called guests.
    – wschopohl
    Jul 17, 2020 at 15:19
  • 1
    You might have to watch what you put under namespace and inside auth.php, but otherwise no. I think I will try to implement this myself this evening if I find the time and post a link as how to.
    – wschopohl
    Jul 17, 2020 at 15:39
2

In Laravel, default web guard used for authentication.

config/auth.php


'defaults' => [
    'guard' => 'web',
    'passwords' => 'users',
 ],

 /** Define driver and respective provider, Supported: session, token **/ 

 'guards' => [
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'users', 
    ],

    'admin' => [
        'driver' => 'session',  
        'provider' => 'admin',
    ],
    //..
 ],

 /** Defines how the users are retrieved out of your database **/

'providers' => [
   'users' => [
       'driver' => 'eloquent',
       'model' => App\User::class,
    ],

    'admin' => [  
        'driver' => 'eloquent',
        'model' => App\Admin::class,
    ],
    //...
]

By default, laravel use following model for authentication. No need to specify guard name here.

App\User

$credentials = $request->only('email', 'password');

Auth::attempt($credentials)

You can create custom guard as well in Laravel, e.g created admin guard and respective model for authentication

App\Admin

$credentials = $request->only('email', 'password');

// specify guard name for custom guard

Auth::guard('admin')->attempt($credentials)

https://laravel.com/docs/7.x/authentication#adding-custom-guards

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