5

I'm trying to make an improvement to an existing Gatsby plug-in, and I want to pass a React Component to the plug-in, through its configuration entry in gatsby-config.js:

  plugins: [
    {
      resolve: `gatsby-plugin-modal-routing`,
      options: { someComponent: SomeComponentClassOrFunction }
    },

However, the problem I'm running into is that I can't figure out how to make it work.

If I try to pass the component itself as part of the plug-in's configuration, it seems to get serialized to/from JSON, resulting in the class becoming a useless object. So it seems I have to pass a path string instead.

  plugins: [
    {
      resolve: `gatsby-plugin-modal-routing`,
      options: {
        modalComponentPath: path.join(__dirname, 'src/components/SomeComponent.js')
      }
    },

However, if I try to pass the path instead, I can't figure out how to use it to load the component inside the plug-in. I've tried using a dynamic Node import (ie. import(path).then(component => ...)) ...

  • with a path that's path.join-ed with __dirname
  • with a relative path (src/components/SomeComponent)
  • with a local-path-relative path (./src/components/SomeComponent)
  • with and without a trailing .js

I'm not sure if this is some sort of issue with the different paths of the app vs. the plug-in or whether there's some other problem, but using import seems like an un-Gatsby-like solution anyway.

So, then I discovered the loadPage and loadPageSync functions which are passed into the plug-in ... but those failed also. Every path I try results in component coming back ... but it's a "page not found" component (presumably because the component I'm trying to pass in hasn't been added as a page).

This seems like it should be a simple question, at least to anyone who has worked on Gatsby plug-ins before: if you want a plug-in to take a component as an input (either as a function/class or as a string of a path to a module) ... how can you actually use that component in your plug-in?

All I'm looking for is a basic pattern or reference to a line in an existing Gatsby plugin that takes a component, or something simple like that (I can look up any details).

5

This seems like it should be a simple question

I had the same thought while trying this out myself. Oh boy.

TL:DR

// gatsby-node.js
const { DefinePlugin } = require('webpack')
const path = require('path')

exports.onCreateWebpackConfig = ({ actions }, { componentPath }) => {
  actions.setWebpackConfig({
    plugins: [
      new DefinePlugin({
        '___COMPONENT___': JSON.stringify(componentPath)
      })
    ]
  })
}
// gatsby-ssr
export const onRenderBody = ({ setPreBodyComponents }) => {
  const Component = require(___COMPONENT___).default
  setPreBodyComponents([<Component />])
}

Long read

Gatsby config doesn't seem to pass functions around (I could have sworn it used to), so passing a React component directly to your custom plugin is out the window. It has to be a path to your component.

// gatsby-config.js

{
  resolve: 'my-custom-plugin',
  options: {
    componentPath: path.join(__dirname, './my-component.js')
  }
}

You didn't say if you're using the component in gatsby-node or gatsby-browser/ssr, but I assume it's the later since requiring stuff dynamically in Node is dead simple:

Gatsby Node

// gatsby-node.js

function consume(component) {
  const Component = require(component)
}

...although it doesn't understand JSX or ESM, but that's a different problem.

Gatsby Browser

gatsby-browser/ssr is run with webpack, so the module format is not a problem. But import(componentPath) won't work:

Dynamic expressions in import()

It is not possible to use a fully dynamic import statement, such as import(foo). Because foo could potentially be any path to any file in your system or project.

webpack doc

Ok, I suppose so something like this should work:

// gatsby-browser
import('./my-dir' + componentPath)

Nope, because webpack will try to resolve this from wherever the plugin live, i.e node_modules or plugins directory & we're not about to ask our users to put their custom components in node_modules.

What about this, then?

// gatsby-browser
import(process.cwd() + componentPath) // nope

We're right back at the beginning — webpack doesn't like full dynamic path! And also even if this works, this is a terrible idea since webpack will try to bundle the whole working directory.


Only if we could encode the path as a static string beforehand, so webpack can just read that code — like using webpack.DefinePlugin to define environment variables. Fortunately we can do that in gatsby-node.js:

// gatsby-node.js
const { DefinePlugin } = require('webpack')
const path = require('path')

exports.onCreateWebpackConfig = ({ actions }) => {
  actions.setWebpackConfig({
    plugins: [
      new DefinePlugin({
        '___CURRENT_DIR___': JSON.stringify(process.cwd())
      })
    ]
  })
}

And finally

// gatsby-browser

// eslint throw error for unknown var, so disable it
// eslint-disable-next-line
import(___CURRENT_DIR___ + componentPath) // works, but don't do this

But since we can access user options right in gatsby-node, let's just encode the whole path:

  // gatsby-node.js
  const { DefinePlugin } = require('webpack')
- const path = require('path')

- exports.onCreateWebpackConfig = ({ actions }) => {
+ exports.onCreateWebpackConfig = ({ actions }, { componentPath }) => {
    actions.setWebpackConfig({
      plugins: [
        new DefinePlugin({
-         '___CURRENT_DIR___': JSON.stringify(process.cwd())
+         '___COMPONENT___': JSON.stringify(componentPath)

        })
      ]
    })
  }

Back in gatsby-browser.js:

// gatsby-browser

// I pick a random API to test, can't imagine why one would import a module in this API
export const onRouteUpdate = async () => {
  // eslint-disable-next-line
  const { default: Component } = await import(___COMPONENT___)
  console.log(Component) // works
}

Gatsby SSR

For the sake of completeness, let's try the same trick in gatby-ssr:

// gatsby-ssr

export const onRenderBody = async ({ setPreBodyComponents }) => {
  // const Component = require(___COMPONENT___).default
  const { default: Component } = await import(___COMPONENT___)
  setPreBodyComponents([<Component />])
}

...and it failed.

Why? If one's curious enough they might go and dig around Gatsby code to see how gatsby-ssr is treated differently than gatsby-browser, but alas I just don't feel like doing that.

Fear not, we still have one trick up our sleeve. Webpack's require can import module dynamically too, though not asynchronously. Since gatsby-ssr doesn't run in the browser, I couldn't care less about asynchronicity.

export const onRenderBody = ({ setPreBodyComponents }) => {
  const Component = require(___COMPONENT___).default
  setPreBodyComponents([<Component />]) // works
}

And now it works.

Sharing code between gatsby-ssr & gatsby-browser

Let's just say we need this component in both gatsby-ssr and gatsby-browser — would require(...) works in gatsby-browser too?

export const onRouteUpdate = async () => {
  // eslint-disable-next-line
  const { default: Component } = require(___COMPONENT___)
  console.log(Component) // yes
}

It works.

import(..) vs require()

While import() does load stuff dynamically, it is more of a tool for code-splitting. Here's some different, other than asynchronicity:

  • using import('./my-dir' + componentPath) will bundle all files inside ./my-dir into a chunk. There's magic comment we can use to exclude/include stuff.

  • require(...) will just inline the required component into whatever chunk's calling it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.