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I am coming across hardship trying to understand how C compiler interprets character arrays, strings, integers, and arrays in a shady way. And thanks for helping me out. Even many of reddit users pointed out that the whole pointer thing in C is a bit shady on how exactly it interprets commands. So, I am trying to understand malloc with an example. But before that this is what I understand. Say *p is a variable. Then p holds the address it's pointing towards. and *p references the value that the address holds. In case of dynamic allocation, When I do

int *p = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5); //say we want 5 locations //

And manually loop as the user gives in all 5 values, I put in the values like

scanf("%d", p+i) // as p already holds address, I get that we don't have to provide the & . And i being the iterator.. //

and then print the same with another loop here's what happens and I have not a clue why.

Say the user inputs 55,66,77,88,99

When I print using this code,

printf("%d", *p+i); // De-referencing the values in location p by using asterics, + the value of iteration,i //

I get the values as crazy as 55,56,57,58,59

So from a little help from internet, I tried the printf code like this and it worked like a charm, but I didn't have to even de-reference. Why the heck is this so confusing?

printf("%d", p[i]); // No asterics used. How does the compiler know I want the value and not the address? as p only should hold the addresses, and *p should give us the values in those addresses //

Also, somehow if I do printf("%d", *p++); Then also it works. Why I am not getting how C works?

Also on the same note, if I try to do the same but this time with scanf("%d", p[i]);, then syntax error. I mean why?

Thanks ...

3

Say *p is a variable

No. The variable is p and its type is int*.


  • *p: the value found at address p
  • *p+i parsed as (*p) + 1: the value at address p then add the value 1 to that value
  • p[i] equivalent with *(p + i): the value at address p + i where p + i is the address of the ith element of an array of ints that starts at p. A.k.a. the ith element in the vector of ints starting at p
  • *p++ parsed as *(p++): increment the pointer p (i.e. make p point at the next element) and get the value from the old value of p.
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  • Re "The variable is p and its type is int*.", That's the int* p view of the world. The int *p view of the world is that *p is an object of type int.
    – ikegami
    Jul 19 '20 at 6:34
  • @ikegami I respectfully disagree. In the declaration int* p the variable declared is p and the type of the variable being declared is int *. Outside of the declaration *p is an expression comprised of the deference unary operator applied to the id p and yes it evaluates to an object of type int. But a variable is denoted by a symbol (identifier) and that identifier is p that is the name of the variable.
    – bolov
    Jul 19 '20 at 6:46
  • Re "I respectfully disagree", Yet you almost repeated what I said word for word. I 100% agree with what you said, and it doesn't contradict what I said earlier.
    – ikegami
    Jul 19 '20 at 6:51
  • @ikegami then I misunderstood you and I apologize.
    – bolov
    Jul 19 '20 at 7:35
  • @ikegami: *p is an expression of type int that happens to be an lvalue, but it is not an object of type int. Thinking of it that way will just sow confusion. Replace p with a function call that returns a pointer - *f() could still be an lvalue, but would you seriously consider it an object?
    – John Bode
    Jul 19 '20 at 13:12
1
int *p = ....

Here, p is a variable of type int *, which means, variable p is a pointer which can hold the address of an int type.

The in memory view of allocated and initialised memory, pointed by p, would be something like this:

p ______
       |
      \|/
     --------------------------
     | 55 | 66 | 77 | 88 | 99 |
     --------------------------

You are correct on statement scanf("%d", p+i); -
// as p already holds address, I get that we don't have to provide the &.....

Question I:

When I print using this code,

printf("%d", *p+i); // De-referencing the values in location p by using asterics, + the value of iteration,i //

I get the values as crazy as 55,56,57,58,59

The precedence of unary * (indirection) operator is higher than binary + operator.
So, the expression *p+i will be evaluated as - (*p)+i.

Note that operator precedence is the priority for grouping different types of operators with their operands.

When you have printf("%d", *p+i); statement in a loop body which is iterating the given allocated array from i = 0 to i < 5 -
In the first iteration: (i = 0 and pointer p is pointing to first element of array which is 55):

(*p) + 0  ->  55 + 0  ->  55

In the second iteration: (i = 1 and pointer p is pointing to first element of array which is 55):

(*p) + 1  ->  55 + 1  ->  56

..... so on
.....

In the fifth iteration: (i = 4 and pointer p is pointing to first element of array which is 55):

(*p) + 4  ->  55 + 4  ->  59

Hence you are getting output - 55,56,57,58,59.

To get the expected output, group the operator with operands explicitely - *(p + i).

With this, first the value of i will be added to pointer and then the resultant pointer (address) will be dereferenced.

Question II:

I tried the printf code like this and it worked like a charm, but I didn't have to even de-reference. Why the heck is this so confusing?

printf("%d", p[i]); // No asterics used. How does the compiler know I want the value and not the address? as p only should hold the addresses, and *p should give us the values in those addresses //

From C Standard#6.5.2.1:

The definition of the subscript operator [] is that E1[E2] is identical to (*((E1)+(E2))).

By this definition of subscript operator -

p[i] -> *((p) + (i)) -> *(p + i)

That means, p[i] and *(p + i) are equivalent.
I have already showed you above in the answer that - why *(p + i) will give expected output.
Hence, when using p[i] you are getting expected output.

Question III:

Also, somehow if I do printf("%d", *p++); Then also it works. Why I am not getting how C works?

Again, check the operator precedence table and you will find that precedence of ++ (postfix increment) operator is higher than unary * (indirection) operator. So, the expression *p++ will be evalauted as *(p++).

The post increment operator increase the value of operand by 1 but the value of the expression is the operand's original value prior to the increment operation.

When you have printf("%d", *p++); statement in a loop body which is iterating the given allocated array -
In the first iteration: pointer p is pointing to first element of array which is the element at 0th index.

*(p++) -> p will be incremented but the value of p in the expression will be its value prior to the increment operation which is location of element at `0`th index
       -> *(0th location address) -> 55

In the second iteration: pointer p is pointing to second element of array which is the element at 1st index.

*(p++) -> p will be incremented but the value of p in the expression will be its value prior to the increment operation which is location of element at `1`st index
       -> *(1st location address) -> 66

...... so on
......

In the fifth iteration: pointer p is pointing to fifth element of array which is the element at 4th index.

*(p++) -> p will be incremented but the value of p in the expression will be its value prior to the increment operation which is location of element at `4`th index
       -> *(4th location address) -> 99

and p is now pointing to one element past the end of array.

You will get expected output - 55,66,77,88,99.

Question IV:

Also on the same note, if I try to do the same but this time with scanf("%d", p[i]);, then syntax error. I mean why?

Revisit the definition of subscript operator above in the answer and recall that you are aware of fact that scanf() expect the address of variable (pointer) as argument.

p[i] -> *((p) + (i)) -> *(p + i)

*(p + i) ==> dereferencing the pointer p + i which will give value at that location.
So, p[i] is not the address of ith location of array but its the value at ith location of array. Hence, you are getting error when passing p[i] as argument to scanf().

To get the address of ith location, just add & operation before p[i] -

scanf("%d", &p[i]);

This will work as expected. Again confused, why??

Check this -

&p[i] -> &(p[i]) -> &(*((p) + (i)) -> ((p) + (i)) -> p + i
          |                |
  Precedence of operator   |
  [] is higher than        |
  & operator               |
                           |
      The operator & is used to get the address and the operator * is used for dereferencing.
      These operators cancel the effect of each other when used one after another. 

Hence, the statement

scanf("%d", &p[i]);

is equivalent to this statement

scanf("%d", p + i);

and you know very well why p + i works fine when given as argument in scanf().

Let me know if you have any further question or confusion.

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  • Thanks a lot. It's pretty clear to me, that the shady comment I was giving is based on compiler's choice of precedence. Thanks. I know a lot more now.
    – C0DEV3IL
    Jul 19 '20 at 16:29
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The expression p[i] is exactly equivalent to *(p + i) - given a starting address p, compute the address of the i'th object (not byte!) following that address and dereference the result.

You don’t use the * operator because there’s an implicit dereference in the subscript operation.

*p + i is equivalent to writing p[0] + i - you dereference p and add the value of i to the result, which is why you got the sequence 55, 56, 57, 58, 59 when you were expecting 55, 66, 77, 88, 99.

Life is easier when you use array notation - just write p[i] when you want the i'th object in the sequence.

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I think a small runnable code will help you better understand than me explaining.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int *p = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5);
    int *q = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5);
    int i = 0;
    int test_val = 100;

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        *(p + i) = test_val;
        q[i] = test_val;
        test_val = test_val + 10;
    }

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        printf("p[%d] = %d\n", i, p[i]);

    printf("p[i] gives the value in array p at index i \n\n");

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        printf("q[%d] = %d\n", i, q[i]);
    
    printf("Note that the values in p and q are equal which means that *(x + 1) and x[i] are 2 ways to access the same values \n\n");

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        printf("*p + %d = %d\n", i, *p + i);

    printf("*p + i gets value pointed by p and adds i to it in each iteration \n\n");

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        printf("*(p + %d) = %d\n", i, *(p + i));

    printf("*(p + i) gets value pointed by p + i \n\n");

    int *j = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5);
    int *k = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5);
    int *l = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int)*5);

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
         j[i] = test_val;
         k[i] = test_val;
         l[i] = test_val;
    }
    printf("(*j)++ = %d\n\n", (*j)++);
    printf("*(k++) = %d\n\n", *(k++));
    printf("*l++ = %d\n\n", *l++);
    
    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
         j[i] = test_val;
         k[i] = test_val;
         l[i] = test_val;
    }
    printf("test_val = %d\n\n", test_val);
    printf("++(*j) = %d\n\n", ++(*j));
    printf("*(++k) = %d\n\n", *(++k));
    printf("*++l = %d\n\n", *++l);
    return 0;
}

Following is the output:

p[0] = 100
p[1] = 110
p[2] = 120
p[3] = 130
p[4] = 140
p[i] gives the value in array p at index i 

q[0] = 100
q[1] = 110
q[2] = 120
q[3] = 130
q[4] = 140
Note that the values in p and q are equal which means that *(x + 1) and x[i] are 2 ways to access the same values 

*p + 0 = 100
*p + 1 = 101
*p + 2 = 102
*p + 3 = 103
*p + 4 = 104
*p + i gets value pointed by p and adds i to it in each iteration 

*(p + 0) = 100
*(p + 1) = 110
*(p + 2) = 120
*(p + 3) = 130
*(p + 4) = 140
*(p + i) gets value pointed by p + i 

test_val = 150

(*j)++ = 150

*(k++) = 150

*l++ = 150

test_val = 150

++(*j) = 151

*(++k) = 150

*++l = 150

For the scanf question, scanf always needs a pointer as a parameter. p[I] is the value at (p + i) and thus is incorrect. Ideally, you should use scanf("%d", &(p[i]))

0

"When I print using this code printf("%d", *p+i); ... I get the values as crazy as 55,56,57,58,59"

When you use *p + i, p is dereferenced first (which gains the value of the first array element, which is 55) and then i is added to the value 55. *p + i is equal to (*p) + i.

This is why you get the output of: 55,56,57,58,59 and not 55,66,77,88,99

You just add i to the value of the first element in each iteration and never access the following 4 array elements.

"I tried the printf code like this and it worked like a charm, but I didn't have to even de-reference. .... printf("%d", p[i]);"

When you use p[i], you get the value at the ith element of the array as it offsets the pointer itself before dereferencing. It is equal to *(p + i).

"Also, somehow if I do printf("%d", *p++); Then also it works."

When you use *p++, p is actual dereferenced and the value at *p is gained but thereafter p is incremented. Means at the next iteration p points to the next array element.

After the loop has been completed, p points one past the array.


"If I try to do the same but this time with scanf("%d", p[i]);, then syntax error. I mean why?"

For scanf() the things are a little bit different.

When you use scanf("%d", p[i]);, p[i] is equal to *(p + i) as it is also in the printf() calls but as you try to dereference and gain an int object and not a pointer to int, which is needed for %d at scanf(), it is a syntax error.

In scanf(), %d requires an argument of type int *, not int.


For your main question:

"Why we don't need to de-reference pointer value in case of malloc array?"

It has nothing to do with malloc()ed or dynamic memory allocation in particular. It has something to do with pointer arithmetic syntax allowed in C.

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