3

I have a range of Azure Function apps all outputting messages to Azure Service Bus using the IAsyncCollector<Message>:

public async Task Run([ServiceBus(...)] IAsyncCollector<Message> messages)
{
    ...
    await messages.AddAsync(msg);
}

I'm getting errors logged from time to time looking like this:

Microsoft.Azure.WebJobs.Host.FunctionInvocationException: Exception while executing function: Function
 ---> Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.ServiceBusTimeoutException: The operation did not complete within the allocated time 00:00:59.9999536 for object message.Reference: ..., 7/13/2020 2:46:24 PM
 ---> System.TimeoutException: The operation did not complete within the allocated time 00:00:59.9999536 for object message.
   at Microsoft.Azure.Amqp.AsyncResult.End[TAsyncResult](IAsyncResult result)
   at Microsoft.Azure.Amqp.SendingAmqpLink.EndSendMessage(IAsyncResult result)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.TaskFactory`1.FromAsyncCoreLogic(IAsyncResult iar, Func`2 endFunction, Action`1 endAction, Task`1 promise, Boolean requiresSynchronization)
--- End of stack trace from previous location where exception was thrown ---
   at Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.Core.MessageSender.OnSendAsync(IList`1 messageList)
   --- End of inner exception stack trace ---
   at Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.Core.MessageSender.OnSendAsync(IList`1 messageList)
   at Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.RetryPolicy.RunOperation(Func`1 operation, TimeSpan operationTimeout)
   at Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.RetryPolicy.RunOperation(Func`1 operation, TimeSpan operationTimeout)
   at Microsoft.Azure.ServiceBus.Core.MessageSender.SendAsync(IList`1 messageList)
   at Microsoft.Azure.WebJobs.ServiceBus.Bindings.MessageSenderExtensions.SendAndCreateEntityIfNotExists(MessageSender sender, Message message, Guid functionInstanceId, EntityType entityType, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
   at My.Function.Run(String mySbMsg, IAsyncCollector`1 messages)

I'm having a bit of a hard time figuring out when in the pipeline this happens. But I have recently learned about the FlushAsync method:

await messages.AddAsync(msg);
await messages.FlushAsync();

My question is the following. Why would I ever NOT include a call to FlushAsync in my function? Getting the timeout exception in my own code will make it possible to retry, do better exception logging, and more. Any downsides of flushing manually like this within the function code?

5

Why would I ever NOT include a call to FlushAsync in my function? Getting the timeout exception in my own code will make it possible to retry, do better exception logging, and more.

I'm going to go a bit further here and say that after I earned some experience with Azure Functions, I now avoid IAsyncCollector<T> completely. Some implementations publish on AddAsync; other implementations may publish on both AddAsync and FlushAsync. I suspect the service bus implementation is actually publishing on AddAsync, in which case FlushAsync may be a noop.

The nice part about IAsyncCollector<T> is that it gives you a "write these things" abstraction; all you have to do is provide a connection string, and the rest is magic. The problem with IAsyncCollector<T> is that it gives you an abstraction, and thus you have much less control.

Under the hood, how many retries are being done? Are they using constant delays or exponentially increasing? What's the behavior if it never succeeds? Usually none of this critical information is documented.

What's especially annoying is when the AF team changes the semantics of the abstraction. E.g., for some of the output bindings (either CosmosDB or storage, I don't remember), the retry behavior changed from one release of the functions SDK to the next.

So, I've gravitated towards avoiding output bindings, especially IAsyncCollector<T>. I usually want to do tight but exponentially increasing de-correlated jittered retries with a cap of a minute or so, but aborted when there's only a minute left of Functions runtime, and then the recovery behavior changes to writing a message to an error queue (with retries). This is way more complex than an IAsyncCollector<T> could ever provide, but it isn't that hard to do with Polly calling the SDKs directly.

Any downsides of flushing manually like this within the function code?

No. By default, IAsyncCollector<T>.FlushAsync is called by the functions host after your function executes. So if you call it yourself, you're just calling it early. It should be safe to call multiple times.

4
  • That's a great suggestion actually. A feature like retry is something I have had a hard time figuring out if included or not in each binding. Sometimes I've even ended up in situation where I have wrapped a retrying call in Polly which caused too many retries. – ThomasArdal Jul 20 '20 at 15:18
  • @ThomasArdal retrying call in Polly sample ? – Kiquenet Oct 24 '20 at 18:45
  • 1
    Please use a new question to ask how to use Polly. – ThomasArdal Oct 24 '20 at 19:43
  • There's the following open issue around driving consistency of batching behaviour with the IAsyncCollector – Zhaph - Ben Duguid Nov 9 '20 at 18:16
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There's nothing wrong with calling FlushAsync in your code. The current implementation of IAsyncCollector for the ServiceBus output binding is that your messages get batched until FlushAsync is called or the function returns. When trying to send a high volume of messages I stumbled on the same Timeout exception as you. The solution I found is to call FlushAsync every N messages, in my case N=100 was the best trade-off. Calling FlushAsync too often would trigger obvious performance penalties.

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