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I want to generate clean assembly like Compiler Explorer locally. Note that, I read How to remove “noise” from GCC/clang assembly output? before attempting this. The output using that method isn't as clean or dense compared to godbolt and still has a lot of asm directives and unused labels in it.

How can I get clean assembly output without any unused labels or directives?

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    Have you considered just cloning the compiler-explorer repo and using it locally? Matt Godbolt recommends that playing around with asm output for a file that's part of a large project with lots of dependencies. e.g. isocpp.org/blog/2017/10/… apparently explains how. I think Matt also mentions this in his CPPcon talk about Compiler Explorer, “What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately? Unbolting the Compiler's Lid” Jul 21, 2020 at 14:40
  • 2
    @PeterCordes I did try that, but I did this out of a few of reasons. A) Setting up godbolt locally for this is non-trivial. B) Godbolt can't clean-up already generated assembly. C) I just wanted to do this myself, and see what the compiler was actually doing behind the scenes.
    – Waqar
    Jul 21, 2020 at 14:52
  • Simply dump the content of elf file with objdump and filter labels you did not need.
    – Klaus
    Jul 21, 2020 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

15

For the record, it is possible (and apparently not too hard) to set up a local install of Matt Godbolt's Compiler Explorer stuff, so you can use that to explore asm output for files that are part of existing large projects with their #include dependencies and everything.

If you already have some asm output, @Waqar's answer looks useful. Or maybe that functionality can be used on its own from the Compiler Explorer repo via node.js, IDK.

According to the install info in the readme in https://github.com/compiler-explorer/compiler-explorer (Matt's repo), you can simply run make after cloning it on a machine that has node.js installed.


I also found https://isocpp.org/blog/2017/10/cpp-weekly-episode-83-installing-compiler-explorerjason-turner which might have more details (or be obsolete at this point, IDK).

I think Matt also mentions using a local clone of Compiler Explorer in his CppCon 2017 talk about Compiler Explorer (maybe replying to a question at the end), “What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately? Unbolting the Compiler's Lid”, and recommends it for playing with code that uses lots of #include that would be hard to get onto https://godbolt.org/. (Or for closed-source code).

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A while ago, I needed something like this locally so I wrote a small tool to make the asm readable.

It attempts to 'clean' and make the 'asm' output from 'gcc' readable using C++ itself. It does something similar to Compiler Explorer and tries to remove all the directives and unused labels, making the asm clean. Only standard library is used for this.

Some things I should mention:

  • Will only with gcc and clang
  • Only tested with C++ code
  • compile with -S -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables -fno-dwarf2-cfi-asm -masm=intel, (remove -masm= if you want AT&T asm) AT&T syntax will probably work but I didn't test it much. The other two options are to remove the .cfi directives. It can be handled using the code below but the compiler itself does a much better job of this. See the answer by Peter Cordes above.
  • This program can work as standalone, but I would highly recommend reading this SO answer to tune your asm output and then process it using this program to remove unused labels / directives etc.
  • abi::__cxa_demangle() is used for demangling
  • Disclaimer: This isn't a perfect solution, and hasn't been tested extensively.

The strategy used for cleaning the asm(There are probably better, faster more efficient ways to do this):

  1. Collect all the labels
  2. Go through the asm line by line and check if the labels are used/unused
  3. If the labels are unused, they get deleted
  4. Every line beginning with '.' gets deleted, unless it is a used somewhere

Update 1: Not all static data gets removed now.

#include <algorithm>
#include <cxxabi.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <regex>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <unordered_map>

// trim from both ends (in place)
std::string_view trim(std::string_view s)
{
    s.remove_prefix(std::min(s.find_first_not_of(" \t\r\v\n"), s.size()));
    s.remove_suffix(std::min(s.size() - s.find_last_not_of(" \t\r\v\n") - 1, s.size()));
    return s;
}

static inline bool startsWith(const std::string_view s, const std::string_view searchString)
{
    return (s.rfind(searchString, 0) == 0);
}

std::string demangle(std::string &&asmText)
{
    int next = 0;
    int last = 0;
    while (next != -1) {
        next = asmText.find("_Z", last);
        //get token
        if (next != -1) {
            int tokenEnd = asmText.find_first_of(":,.@[]() \n", next + 1);
            int len = tokenEnd - next;
            std::string tok = asmText.substr(next, len);
            int status = 0;
            char* name = abi::__cxa_demangle(tok.c_str(), 0, 0, &status);
            if (status != 0) {
                std::cout << "Demangling of: " << tok << " failed, status: " << status << '\n';
                continue;
            }
            std::string demangledName{name};
            demangledName.insert(demangledName.begin(), ' ');
            asmText.replace(next, len, demangledName);
            free((void*)name);
        }
    }
    return std::move(asmText);
}

std::string clean_asm(const std::string& asmText)
{
    std::string output;
    output.reserve(asmText.length());
    std::stringstream s{asmText};

    //1. collect all the labels
    //2. go through the asm line by line and check if the labels are used/unused
    //3. if the labels are unused, they get deleted
    //4. every line beginning with '.' gets deleted, unless it is a used label

    std::regex exp {"^\\s*[_|a-zA-Z]"};
    
    std::regex directiveRe { "^\\s*\\..*$" };
    std::regex labelRe { "^\\.*[a-zA-Z]+[0-9]+:$" };
    std::regex hasOpcodeRe { "^\\s*[a-zA-Z]" };
    std::regex numericLabelsRe { "\\s*[0-9]:" };

    const std::vector<std::string> allowedDirectives =
    {
        ".string", ".zero", ".byte", ".value", ".long", ".quad", ".ascii"
    };

    //<label, used>
    std::unordered_map<std::string, bool> labels;

    //1
    std::string line;
    while (std::getline(s, line)) {
        if (std::regex_match(line, labelRe)) {
            trim(line);
            // remove ':'
            line = line.substr(0, line.size() - 1);
            labels[line] = false;
        }
    }

    s.clear();
    s.str(asmText);
    line = "";

    //2
    while (std::getline(s, line)) {
        if (std::regex_match(line, hasOpcodeRe)) {
            auto it = labels.begin();   
            for (; it != labels.end(); ++it) {
                if (line.find(it->first)) {
                    labels[it->first] = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    //remove false labels from labels hash-map
    for (auto it = labels.begin(); it != labels.end();) {
        if (it->second == false)
            it = labels.erase(it);
        else
            ++it;
    }

    s.clear();
    s.str(asmText);
    line = "";

    std::string currentLabel;

    //3
    while (std::getline(s, line)) {
        trim(line);

        if (std::regex_match(line, labelRe)) {
            auto l = line;
            l = l.substr(0, l.size() - 1);
            currentLabel = "";
            if (labels.find(l) != labels.end()) {
                currentLabel = line;
                output += line + "\n";
            }
            continue;
        }

        if (std::regex_match(line, directiveRe)) {
            //if we are in a label
            if (!currentLabel.empty()) {
                auto trimmedLine = trim(line);
                for (const auto& allowedDir : allowedDirectives) {
                    if (startsWith(trimmedLine, allowedDir)) {
                        output += line;
                        output += '\n';
                    }
                }
            }
            continue;
        }

        if (std::regex_match(line, numericLabelsRe)) {
            continue;
        }

        if (line == "endbr64") {
            continue;
        }

        if (line[line.size() - 1] == ':' || line.find(':') != std::string::npos) {
            currentLabel = line;
            output += line + '\n';
            continue;
        }

        line.insert(line.begin(), '\t');

        output += line + '\n';
    }

    return output;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if (argc < 2) {
        std::cout << "Please provide more than asm filename you want to process.\n";
    }
    std::ifstream file(argv[1]);
    std::string output;
    if (file.is_open()) {
        std::cout << "File '" << argv[1] << "' is opened\n";
        std::string line;
        while (std::getline(file, line)) {
            output += line + '\n';
        }
    }

    output = demangle(std::move(output));
    output = clean_asm(output);

    std::string fileName = argv[1];
    auto dotPos = fileName.rfind('.');
    if (dotPos != std::string::npos)
        fileName.erase(fileName.begin() + dotPos, fileName.end());

    std::cout << "Asm processed. Saving as '"<< fileName <<".asm'";
    std::ofstream out;
    out.open(fileName + ".asm");
    out << output;

    return 0;
}
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    Removing every . line will remove directives like .byte and .ascii. Sometimes you do want to see what static data / constants the compiler emitted. (But that's harder, so as a first step just killing it all is fine.) Jul 21, 2020 at 14:53
  • 1
    Update: it doesn't remove all the directives now, so directives which are used will still be there in the output.
    – Waqar
    Jul 24, 2020 at 15:50
4

I checked Compiler Explorer to see if they had a specific set of compiler options to get their output. But they don't. Instead they filter the assembly listing with this function. There's also an additional processing step that merges the debug info into source and assembly highlighting.

To answer your question, I don't think it's possible with GCC itself right now (Sep 2021).

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