11

I have a manager class that has an Android and iOS impl (from a 3rd party lib). "ex. MyManagerImpl()". To construct the 3rd party manager, iOS does not require a Context but Android does. I created a common class "MyManager" which pulls out all the common methods needed to be called within commonMain.

//commonMain
expect class MyManager {
  fun method1()
  companion object Factory {
    makeManager(): MyManager
  }
}

val manager = MyManager.Factory.makeManager() // ex intended usage

//androidMain
MyManagerImpl(context: Context) {
  fun method1()
}

actual class MyManager private constructor(manager: MyManagerImpl) {
  ..
  actual companion object Factory {
    override fun makeManager(): MyManager {
      return MyManager(MyManagerImpl(?how to get context?))
    }
  }
}

//iosMain
MyManagerImpl() {
  fun method1()
}

actual class MyManager private constructor(manager: MyManagerImpl) {
  ..
  actual companion object Factory {
    override fun makeManager(): MyManager {
      return MyManager(MyManagerImpl())
    }
  }
}

What is the cleanest way to merge the two implementations? Is it possible to do so even tho they have different constructor dependencies? We would like to be able to construct the classes lazily within commonMain. Is this possible?

6 Answers 6

8

Dependency Injection of Context

I had the same issue with the SQLDelight SqlDriver, which requires a context on Android, but not on iOS. With Kodein-DI or Koin, this can be done without any messy static variables by using injection for the context.

The basic concept is that expect/actual is used to create a platform-specific factory class (ManagerFactory).

On Android, the actual implementation of ManagerFactory takes the context as a parameter, which can be obtained from the DI context (for Kodein-DI on Android, see the androidXModule code and docs).

Once the factory class has been defined in both the android and iOS DI modules, it can then be injected/retrieved in the common module, and the retrieved MyManager instance bound into the DI, and used wherever it is needed.

It would look something like this using Kodein-DI:

commonMain

//commonMain
expect class ManagerFactory {
    fun createManager(): MyManager
}

val sharedModule = DI.Module("common") {
    bind<MyManager>() with singleton { instance<ManagerFactory>().createManager() }

    // now you can inject MyManager wherever...
}

androidMain

//androidMain
actual class ManagerFactory(private val context: Context) {
    actual fun createManager(): MyManager = MyAndroidManagerImpl(context)
}

val androidModule = DI.Module("android") {
    importAll(sharedModule)

    // instance<Context> via androidXModule, see `MainApplication` below
    bind<ManagerFactory>() with singleton { ManagerFactory(instance<Context>()) }
}

class MainApplication : Application(), DIAware {
    override val di by DI.lazy {
        // androidXModule (part of Kodein's android support library) gives us access to the context, as well as a lot of other Android services
        // see https://github.com/Kodein-Framework/Kodein-DI/blob/7.1/framework/android/kodein-di-framework-android-core/src/main/java/org/kodein/di/android/module.kt
        import(androidXModule(this@MainApplication))
        importAll(androidModule)
    }
}

iosMain

//iosMain
actual class ManagerFactory {
    actual fun createManager(): MyManager = MyNativeManagerImpl()
}

val iosModule = DI.Module("ios") {
    importAll(sharedModule)
    bind<ManagerFactory>() with singleton { ManagerFactory() }
}
2
  • in this way how can you inject MyManager in the commonMain part? I guess this doesn't solve that problem or am I missing something?
    – insa_c
    Commented Apr 19, 2021 at 2:41
  • @insa_c It does solve that problem. I've made some edits to the answer to hopefully make it clearer -- let me know if it makes sense now!
    – Raman
    Commented Apr 19, 2021 at 16:18
3

Here's what we did (without dependency injection as we have not yet set it up) for our database factory to solve this problem:

We created a class called AppContext in a bottom level (has no other dependencies) module. In the commonMain we have the expected class:

expect class AppContext private constructor()

Then in the androidMain we have this:

actual class AppContext private actual constructor() {
    lateinit var context: Context
        private set

    constructor(context: Context) : this() {
        this.context = context
    }
}

The iosMain implementation will be the same as the commonMain one but with actual (you can do something similar to the actual Android implementation if you need to access some other properties):

actual class AppContext private actual constructor()

The key thing here is that it has the same expected and actual constructors so the compiler thinks of it as having the same signature and being the same class, but we actually have different implementations for it exposed for Android and iOS.

We create this AppContext on app start and pass it to the bootstrapper where we pass it to the DbFactory so that we can create the respective databases.

class DbFactory(appContext: AppContext, userId: String) : DataBaseFactory {
    private val sqlDriver =
        appContext.createSqlDriver(dbFileName = "$userId$DB_FILE_NAME_SUFFIX")
}

And the expected and actual implementations of createSqlDriver:

commonMain:

internal expect fun AppContext.createSqlDriver(dbFileName: String): SqlDriver

androidMain:

internal actual fun AppContext.createSqlDriver(dbFileName: String): SqlDriver =
    AndroidSqliteDriver(
        schema = KmmDb.Schema,
        context = context,
        name = dbFileName
    )

iosMain:

internal actual fun AppContext.createSqlDriver(dbFileName: String): SqlDriver =
    NativeSqliteDriver(
        schema = KmmDb.Schema,
        name = dbFileName
    )
2

There isn't a super clean way to do this, as a general rule. There's no way to just globally grab a Context from Android. Although not pretty, I'd do something like this:

//androidMain
class MyManagerImpl(context: Context) {
    fun method1(){}
}

actual class MyManager private constructor(manager: MyManagerImpl) {

    actual companion object Factory {
        lateinit var factoryContxet :Context
        override fun makeManager(): MyManager {
            return MyManager(MyManagerImpl(factoryContxet))
        }
    }
}

class SampleApplication : Application{
    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate()
        MyManager.Factory.factoryContxet = this
    }
}

If you want to be able to call this from any code, init the Context on app start. Holding that in a static reference won't show up on everybody's best practice list, but it's not a technical issue per see. Alternatively, you could do something like that with an Activity, but that has it's own set of issues.

3
  • 2
    thank you for your response! Since my mpp project includes an android library target I might be able to define the application class within androidMain that does this messiness and clients will just have to implement that application class. I was also thinking DI with kodein might clean things up but i was not able to figure out how I would retrieve the context within the companion object. I will wait to see if any other possible solutions come in and if not I'll accept your answer as it does solve my problem. Thanks again.
    – Maurycy
    Commented Jul 21, 2020 at 20:04
  • @Maurycy see my clean solution with Kodelin DI, no static references necessary: stackoverflow.com/a/64141659/430128.
    – Raman
    Commented Apr 19, 2021 at 16:33
  • 1
    Yeah, I mean, if you want to do a full app init with DI we do similar things with Koin. See github.com/touchlab/KaMPKit. The application is pushed in on app start, and the rest is injected, which is going to be kind of a similar thing here. At some point you need to deal with the fact that Android needs you to live within it's lifecycle. Since you need Application for a lot of things, I tend to override the Application class and start the dependency chain in onCreate. Commented Apr 20, 2021 at 13:34
1

We're doing it like this (example for bundleId - maybe it will help you):

expect fun bundleId(context: Any?): String?

androidMain:

actual fun bundleId(context: Any?): String? {
    (context as? Context)?.let {
        return AndroidIdentifier(it).getBundleId()
    }
    throw Exception("")
}

iosMain:

actual fun bundleId(context: Any?): String? =
        NSBundle.mainBundle.bundleIdentifier
2
  • 1
    "We would like to be able to construct the classes lazily within commonMain. Is this possible?" How would you call that from common code? Commented Jul 23, 2020 at 17:45
  • thanks for the reply. This was my original "hacky" solution but due to what Kevin mentioned this unfortunately wont work for constructing objects from commonMain. I think having a static context reference is the best bet here (unfortunately).
    – Maurycy
    Commented Jul 27, 2020 at 19:34
1

I came up with another "hacky" solution, which doesn't require static references:

data class PlatformDependencies(
  val androidContext: Any?,
  val someIosOnlyDependency: Any?
)
// in commonMain
expect class ManagerFactory(platformDeps: PlatformDependencies) {
  fun create(): Manager
}

// in androidMain
actual class ManagerFactory actual constructor(
  private val platformDeps: PlatformDependencies
) {
  override fun create(): Manager {
    val context = platformDeps.androidContext as? Context 
      ?: error("missing context in platform deps")     
    return AndroidManager(context)
  }
}

// in iosMain: similar to androidMain, but using "someIosOnlyDependency"

Then you'd have to bind an instance of PlatformDependencies with specific values in your platform root gradle projects.

Having an object with just platform specific deps allows you to use it to construct any platform-dependent class down the DI module hierarchy.

It's still far from elegant solution, relies on discipline and somewhat leaks platforms' details into a common code, but it works.

1

You can use the App Startup Library on Android to grab a context in your Android specific code without exposing a different API than iOS.

Basically, you add App Startup to your Android module dependencies, add a provider entry in AndroidManifest and implement the Initializer interface: Android will automatically call the create method with a valid context at app startup.

lateinit var applicationContext: Context
    private set

object MyModule

class MyInitializer: Initializer<MyModule> {
    override fun create(context: Context): MyModule {
        applicationContext = context.applicationContext
        return MyModule
    }

    override fun dependencies(): List<Class<out Initializer<*>>> {
        return listOf()
    }
}

Then, you can use the applicationContext anywhere when needed.

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