6

I am trying to type the __new__ method in a metaclass in Python so that it pleases mypy. The code would be something like this (taken from pep-3115 - "Metaclasses in Python 3000" and stripped down a bit):

from __future__ import annotations

from typing import Type


# The metaclass
class MetaClass(type):

    # The metaclass invocation
    def __new__(cls: Type[type], name: str, bases: tuple, classdict: dict) -> type:
        result = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, classdict)
        print('in __new__')
        return result


class MyClass(metaclass=MetaClass):
    pass

With this, mypy complains, Incompatible return type for "__new__" (returns "type", but must return a subtype of "MetaClass"), pointing at the line def __new__.

I have also tried with:

def __new__(cls: Type[MetaClass], name: str, bases: tuple, classdict: dict) -> MetaClass:

Then mypy complains (about the return result line): Incompatible return value type (got "type", expected "MetaClass").

I have also tried with a type var (TSubMetaclass = TypeVar('TSubMetaclass', bound='MetaClass')) and the result is the same as using MetaClass.

Using super().__new__ instead of type.__new__ gave similar results.

What would be the correct way to do it?

5

First, the return type is MetaClass, not type. Second, you need to explicitly cast the return value, since type.__new__ doesn't know it is returning an instance of MetaClass. (Its specific return type is determined by its first argument, which isn't known statically.)

from __future__ import annotations

from typing import Type, cast


# The metaclass
class MetaClass(type):

    # The metaclass invocation
    def __new__(cls: Type[type], name: str, bases: tuple, classdict: dict) -> MetaClass:
        result = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, classdict)
        print('in __new__')
        return cast(MetaClass, result)


class MyClass(metaclass=MetaClass):
    pass

To use super, you need to adjust the static type of the cls parameter.

class MetaClass(type):

    # The metaclass invocation
    def __new__(cls: Type[MetaClass], name: str, bases: tuple, classdict: dict) -> MetaClass:
        result = super().__new__(name, bases, classdict)
        print('in __new__')
        return cast(MetaClass, result)
5
  • That seems like a hack - for example, that signature would prevent you from using super(), since the 2nd arg would not be an instance of the 1st. Well, to be honest, cast seems generally wrong in Python typing, like a lie. It seems to me that if we start with something like def __new__(cls: Type[MetaClass [...], then type.__new__(cls [...] should understand that it is returning an instance of MetaClass. So I'll wait to see if there is some solution w/o using cast before accepting your answer. Thanks! – Enrique Pérez Arnaud Jul 23 '20 at 14:13
  • You're not wrong. I did notice the issue with super, which is why I didn't include it in the answer. – chepner Jul 23 '20 at 15:16
  • The problem with super can be resolved by changing the annotation of cls to Type[MetaClass], but I think that has its own issues if you have a metaclass hierarchy. (I shudder at the thought of anything that complex, though.) – chepner Jul 23 '20 at 15:19
  • 1
    Mmm yes, if we change the cls annotation to Type[MetaClass] and we cast the result, we can use super() and it pleases mypy... I really wish there was a solution w/o casting, but for now I'll accept your answer :) – Enrique Pérez Arnaud Jul 23 '20 at 15:34
  • I'd like to see the answer patched to include the proper super() call. – jsbueno Jul 23 '20 at 16:42

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