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I would like to create a type so that it will consist of InputKeys as the keys, and the values will be key/value pairs, keys being the corresponding InputFieldKey, and value is string.

Below is what I have so far. But {[key: string]: string} the key in this context needs to be corresponding field of the main key.

Essentially there is the parent and child relationship constructed with <Record, the parent part is ok. But I can't figure out the child part which needs to be parent / child again.

There could be as many or as little ???InputFieldKeys and those keys can have many fields not just 3 (firstName, lastName, ..., ...)

I am free to modify the code as necessary to create the needed structure, and/or use generics if that helps.

type InputKeys = 'user' | 'building'

type UserInputFieldKey = 'firstName' | 'lastName' | 'age'
type AddressInputFieldKey = 'line1' | 'line2' | 'zip'

type InputError = Record<InputKeys, {[key: string]: string}>

const errors: InputError = {
  user: {
    firstName: 'First name must be entered',
  },
  address: {},
}

Any help is appreciated.

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  • Do you mean something like this: type InputError = Record<InputKeys, {[key in UserInputFieldKey]: string}>?
    – poyea
    Jul 23, 2020 at 15:47

1 Answer 1

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If you were doing this manually, it looks like this is the structure you're looking for:

interface InputErrorManual {
    user: {
        firstName?: string;
        lastName?: string;
        age?: string;
    },
    address: {
        line1?: string;
        line2?: string;
        age?: string;
    }
}

You could, of course, just do that.


If you want the compiler to do something for you programmatically, then you need to tell it about the parent/child relationship in some mapping type, like this:

type InputKeyMapping = {
    user: "firstName" | "lastName" | "age";
    address: "line1" | "line2" | "zip"
}

and then you can use a mapped type to convert that into the structure you're looking for:

type InputError = {
    [K in keyof InputKeyMapping]: Partial<Record<InputKeyMapping[K], string>>
};

You can verify that this is the same structure as in InputErrorManual.


And test them:

const goodErrors: InputError = {
    user: {
        firstName: 'First name must be entered',
    },
    address: {},
}; // okay

const badErrors: InputError = {
    user: {
        lastName: "bad name",
        line1: "oops" // error!
    },
    address: {
        line1: "bad line",
        age: "oops" // error!
    }
}

I'm not sure if doing the programmatic mapping is better or worse for your use case than writing it out manually. Either way should work for you.

Okay, hope that helps; good luck!

Playground link to code

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  • yes, @jcalz thank you, this is what I was looking for, but I could not get my head around it. In the code base that I am working, there are many pages, each page has many inputs categorized, and I write them manually. Would you say that in this scenario, it may be better or not? And why or why not please? I would like to understand the thought process behind it. If you have time.
    – oyalhi
    Jul 23, 2020 at 18:52
  • 1
    I think it just comes down to which one is more work for you. If you already have interfaces corresponding to the different page data, you'd probably find it easier to do the programmatic way by writing type InputMapping = {user: UserInterface, address: AddressInterface, ...} and then using type InputError = {[K in keyof InputMapping]: Partial<Record<keyof InputMapping[K], string>>}. But if you don't already have these types around and have to write them just for InputError, then you might as well write out InputError completely manually. It probably depends on your code base.
    – jcalz
    Jul 23, 2020 at 19:05

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