134

When I console.log() an object in my JavaScript program, I just see the output [object Object], which is not very helpful in figuring out what object (or even what type of object) it is.

In C# I'm used to overriding ToString() to be able to customize the debugger representation of an object. Is there anything similar I can do in JavaScript?

1
  • 2
    I find that output is the most reliable way of telling you what a variable holds (or at least better than typeof).
    – alex
    Jun 10, 2011 at 14:11

15 Answers 15

115

You can override toString in Javascript as well. See example:

function Foo() {}

// toString override added to prototype of Foo class
Foo.prototype.toString = function() {
  return "[object Foo]";
}

var f = new Foo();
console.log("" + f); // console displays [object Foo]

See this discussion on how to determine object type name in JavaScript.

3
  • 8
    While it is true the alert function will display the return value of the function overriding the prototype toString property, Object.prototype.toString.call(f) will still display [object Object]. May 12, 2015 at 20:59
  • 20
    'Object.prototype.toString.call(f) will still display [object Object].' Yeah, because that's a completely different function than 'Foo.prototype.toString', lol.
    – Triynko
    Sep 9, 2016 at 20:12
  • 9
    In case someone else like me ends up here, you can use Sybmol.toStringTag in ES6 to customize the Object.prototype.toString.call behavior. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – TLadd
    Apr 16, 2019 at 20:11
40

First override toString for your object or the prototype:

var Foo = function(){};
Foo.prototype.toString = function(){return 'Pity the Foo';};

var foo = new Foo();

Then convert to string to see the string representation of the object:

//using JS implicit type conversion
console.log('' + foo);

If you don't like the extra typing, you can create a function that logs string representations of its arguments to the console:

var puts = function(){
    var strings = Array.prototype.map.call(arguments, function(obj){
        return '' + obj;
    });
    console.log.apply(console, strings);
};

Usage:

puts(foo)  //logs 'Pity the Foo'

puts(foo, [1,2,3], {a: 2}) //logs 'Pity the Foo 1,2,3 [object Object]'

Update

E2015 provides much nicer syntax for this stuff, but you'll have to use a transpiler like Babel:

// override `toString`
class Foo {
  toString(){
    return 'Pity the Foo';
  }
}

const foo = new Foo();

// utility function for printing objects using their `toString` methods
const puts = (...any) => console.log(...any.map(String));

puts(foo); // logs 'Pity the Foo'
1
  • 9
    console.log('' + foo); this was the problem I did not see any toString implementation until I reached to your answer. Aug 13, 2015 at 9:18
14

An easy way to get debuggable output in browser JS is to just serialize the object to JSON. So you could make a call like

console.log ("Blah: " + JSON.stringify(object));

So for an example, alert("Blah! " + JSON.stringify({key: "value"})); produces an alert with the text Blah! {"key":"value"}

3
  • That is pretty handy. The output can be a bit huge I imagine, but works in a pinch!
    – devios1
    Jun 10, 2011 at 14:36
  • @dev Handy, but doesn't override toString(). Jun 23, 2019 at 19:45
  • Just be careful with circular references and functions. Sep 28, 2020 at 14:34
14

If you are using Node it might be worth considering util.inspect.

var util = require('util')

const Point = {
  x: 1,
  y: 2,
  [util.inspect.custom]: function(depth) { return `{ #Point ${this.x},${this.y} }` }

}

console.log( Point );

This will yield:

{ #Point 1,2 }

While the version without inspect prints:

{ x: 1, y: 2 }

More information (+ an example for using in classes):

https://nodejs.org/api/util.html#util_util_inspect_custom

9

With template literals:

class Foo {
  toString() {
     return 'I am foo';
  }
}

const foo = new Foo();
console.log(`${foo}`); // 'I am foo'
9

Add the 'Symbol.toStringTag' property to the custom object or class.

The string value which is assigned to it will be its default string description because it is accessed internally by the Object.prototype.toString() method.

For example:

class Person {
  constructor(name) {
    this.name = name
  }
  get [Symbol.toStringTag]() {
    return 'Person';
  }
}

let p = new Person('Dan');
Object.prototype.toString.call(p); // [object Person]

class Person {
  constructor(name) {
    this.name = name
  }
  get[Symbol.toStringTag]() {
    return 'Person';
  }
}

let p = new Person('Dan');
console.log(Object.prototype.toString.call(p));

Some Javascript types such as Maps and Promises have a built-in toStringTag symbol defined

Object.prototype.toString.call(new Map());       // "[object Map]"
Object.prototype.toString.call(Promise.resolve()); // "[object Promise]"

Because Symbol.toStringTag is a well-known symbol, we can reference it and verify that the above types do have the Symbol.toStringTag property -

new Map()[Symbol.toStringTag] // 'Map'
Promise.resolve()[Symbol.toStringTag] // 'Promise'
3
  • Is this together with overriding toString() directly the only way to achieve function MyObj() {} Object.prototype.toString.call(new MyObj()) // "[object MyObj]"?
    – tonix
    Mar 9, 2020 at 7:43
  • 1
    @tonix - I think so... If there's another way, please let me know ;)
    – Danield
    Mar 9, 2020 at 8:54
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer for any code written in the last three or four years. As an aside, it's useful in mocking classes in unit tests so you can check the type of object you're instantiating.
    – David G
    Sep 23, 2020 at 18:40
6

Just override the toString() method.

Simple example:

var x = {foo: 1, bar: true, baz: 'quux'};
x.toString(); // returns "[object Object]"
x.toString = function () {
    var s = [];
    for (var k in this) {
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(k)) s.push(k + ':' + this[k]);
    }
    return '{' + s.join() + '}';
};
x.toString(); // returns something more useful

It does even better when you define a new type:

function X()
{
    this.foo = 1;
    this.bar = true;
    this.baz = 'quux';
}

X.prototype.toString = /* same function as before */

new X().toString(); // returns "{foo:1,bar:true,baz:quux}"
2
  • 9
    This code does not solve the OP's console.log issue, at least not in node.js v0.10.* or Chrome Version 32.0.1700.102. While calling toString directly (lame) or using type coercion (lamer) will work with this, console[/info|log/] uses to old pre-mod toString. Jan 29, 2014 at 23:49
  • 1
    It's 2019 now and both nodejs and chrome pretty-print objects on their own, so coercion (when you add the object to a string) is the only use case you would google this question I believe.
    – Klesun
    Aug 13, 2019 at 17:57
6

If the object is defined by yourself you can always add a toString override.

//Defined car Object
var car = {
  type: "Fiat",
  model: 500,
  color: "white",
  //.toString() Override
  toString: function() {
    return this.type;
  }
};

//Various ways to test .toString() Override
console.log(car.toString());
console.log(car);
alert(car.toString());
alert(car);

//Defined carPlus Object
var carPlus = {
  type: "Fiat",
  model: 500,
  color: "white",
  //.toString() Override
  toString: function() {
    return 'type: ' + this.type + ', model: ' + this.model + ', color:  ' + this.color;
  }
};

//Various ways to test .toString() Override
console.log(carPlus.toString());
console.log(carPlus);
alert(carPlus.toString());
alert(carPlus);

0

You can give any custom objects their own toString methods, or write a general one that you can call on the object you are looking at-

Function.prototype.named= function(ns){
    var Rx=  /function\s+([^(\s]+)\s*\(/, tem= this.toString().match(Rx) || "";
    if(tem) return tem[1];
    return 'unnamed constructor'
}

function whatsit(what){
    if(what===undefined)return 'undefined';
    if(what=== null) return 'null object';
    if(what== window) return 'Window object';
    if(what.nodeName){
        return 'html '+what.nodeName;
    }
    try{
        if(typeof what== 'object'){
            return what.constructor.named();
        }
    }
    catch(er){
        return 'Error reading Object constructor';
    }
    var w=typeof what;
    return w.charAt(0).toUpperCase()+w.substring(1);
}
0

-This operation takes lot of time to complete, and it's use is discouraged according to mozilla docs: https://developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/Web/JavaScript/Referencia/Objetos_globales/Object/proto

-Apparently, modern browsers deprecated .prototype and ECMA6 specifies using proper__proto__ instead.

So for example, if you are defining you own object geoposition you should call __proto__ property instead of .prototype:

var  geoposition = {

        lat: window.pos.lat,
        lng: window.pos.lng
    };

geoposition.__proto__.toString = function(){ return "lat: "+this.lat+", lng: "+this.lng }
console.log("Searching nearby donations to: "+geoposition.toString());
0

Here's an example how to stringify a Map object:

  Map.prototype.toString = function() {

    let result = {};

    this.forEach((key, value) => { result[key] = value;});

    return JSON.stringify(result);
  };
-1

The Chrome console log allows you to inspect the object.

2
  • 1
    Yes, that's true if I output just the object, which is handy. However sometimes I just want to output it as part of a string that I might use to contain other data and it would be nice if I could customize that form in some manner.
    – devios1
    Jun 10, 2011 at 14:17
  • 6
    I just discovered that you can use additional arguments in a console.log to output objects inline with a string: console.log("this is my object:", obj).
    – devios1
    Feb 14, 2012 at 15:14
-2

Rather than overriding toString(), if you include the Prototype JavaScript Library, you can use Object.inspect() to get a much more useful representation.

Most popular frameworks include something similar.

-2

You can extend or override in JS

String.prototype.toString = function() {
    return this + "..."
}
document.write("Sergio".toString());

1
  • 1
    How does this add anything to the 2011 answers that give the same solution? Jun 23, 2019 at 19:47
-4
A simple format Date function using Javascript prototype, it can be used for your purpose

https://gist.github.com/cstipkovic/3983879 :

Date.prototype.formatDate = function (format) {
    var date = this,
        day = date.getDate(),
        month = date.getMonth() + 1,
        year = date.getFullYear(),
        hours = date.getHours(),
        minutes = date.getMinutes(),
        seconds = date.getSeconds();

    if (!format) {
        format = "MM/dd/yyyy";
    }

    format = format.replace("MM", month.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));

    if (format.indexOf("yyyy") > -1) {
        format = format.replace("yyyy", year.toString());
    } else if (format.indexOf("yy") > -1) {
        format = format.replace("yy", year.toString().substr(2, 2));
    }

    format = format.replace("dd", day.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));

    if (format.indexOf("t") > -1) {
        if (hours > 11) {
            format = format.replace("t", "pm");
        } else {
            format = format.replace("t", "am");
        }
    }

    if (format.indexOf("HH") > -1) {
        format = format.replace("HH", hours.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));
    }

    if (format.indexOf("hh") > -1) {
        if (hours > 12) {
            hours -= 12;
        }

        if (hours === 0) {
            hours = 12;
        }
        format = format.replace("hh", hours.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));
    }

    if (format.indexOf("mm") > -1) {
        format = format.replace("mm", minutes.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));
    }

    if (format.indexOf("ss") > -1) {
        format = format.replace("ss", seconds.toString().replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1'));
    }

    return format;
};
0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.