0

Currently I am inserting a vector inside another like this:

#include <vector>

int main(const int argc, const char** argv)
{
    std::vector<int> old_elements{1, 2, 3};

    std::vector<int> elements{4, 5, 6};
    elements.insert(elements.end(), old_elements.begin(), old_elements.end());
}

What I want to do is something like this

std::vector<int> get_old_elements()
{
    return std::vector<int>{1, 2, 3};
}

int main(const int argc, const char** argv)
{
    std::vector<int> elements{4, 5, 6};
    elements.insert(elements.end(), get_old_elements());
}

So I cannot call begin and end without first storing the temporary result. Is there a way to get this done? During one of the cppcon talks on ranges, I heard it being said that it might be end of begin and end. So I guess there could be some way to achieve something like this with ranges library.

3
  • How about elements = get_old_elements()? Jul 25 '20 at 2:15
  • Updated the question to make it more clear what I intended to do
    – yasht
    Jul 25 '20 at 2:16
  • 1
    @yasht: Why is it so necessary to avoid storing a local object? Jul 25 '20 at 2:43
2

You can do this:

std::experimental::ranges::copy(get_old_elements(), std::back_inserter(elements));

But it would be more efficient to do this:

template <typename From, typename To>
void append(const From& from, To& to) {
    to.insert(std::begin(from), std::end(from), to.end());
}

append(get_old_elements(), elements);

This can reserve capacity for the new elements whereas back_inserter cannot.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.