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If you are copying a thousand bytes, obviously memcpy() is the better option. Obviously if you're copying one byte, just assigning it is the better option Array[0] = 'A';. This memcpy(Array, (const char[]){'A'}, 1); is stupid. Probably also this memcpy(Array, (const char[]){'B'}, 2);, because the overhead of calling the function wastes more performance than assigning two bytes one by one. But at what point should I use memcpy? What's the max number of bytes is it optimal to copy them one at a time inline? Assuming the compiler doesn't automatically inline the memcpy calls, because some compilers don't. When should I memcpy versus assigning the bytes directly?

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    Always memcpy(), worry about more relevant things. Jul 25 '20 at 21:51
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    A standard answer is "profile your code"
    – user58697
    Jul 25 '20 at 21:52
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    A compiler can inline your call to memcpy(). You can trust it to do a better job than you can almost every time.
    – marko
    Jul 25 '20 at 21:56
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    @user13783520 this is of course true, but not as much as in the bad-old days where if you developed for embedded systems you were stuck with buggy commercial compilers with little completion
    – marko
    Jul 25 '20 at 22:00
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    Which compiler, which options? I've just tried clang for x64 and ARM-8 with -O3 and the compiler is eliding a good deal more than the memcpy() for trivial examples. Modern clang and gcc can optimise away memory allocations as well in some cases where the data is known at compile-time.
    – marko
    Jul 25 '20 at 22:21
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You are making some faulty assumptions about performance:

Obviously if you're copying one byte, just assigning it is the better option Array[0] = 'A';. This memcpy(Array, (const char[]){'A'}, 1); is stupid.

Assigning is better for readability reasons. But from a performance point they are actually the same on any decent compiler with optimizations enabled:

#include <string.h>

void test1(char* Array)
{
    Array[0] = 'A';
}

void test2(char* Array)
{
    memcpy(Array, (const char[]){'A'}, 1);
}

Both functions generate identical code with optimizations enabled:

test1:
        mov     BYTE PTR [rdi], 65
        ret
test2:
        mov     BYTE PTR [rdi], 65
        ret

What you are doing is called premature optimization. Optimization is a complex subject and can be tackled with experience and only with profiling. So first and foremost write code that's readable. Then if there is a performance issue don't optimize in the dark, based on what you think it's the problem; profile first and optimize based on the results of the profiling.

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But at what point should I use memcpy? What's the max number of bytes is it optimal to copy them one at a time inline?

It's impossible to say without profiling your code. Don't make assumptions on such fine optimizations before knowing exactly:

  • Compiler and compiler version
  • Compilation flags and optimization flags
  • The code that is being generated by the compiler
  • The context in which the function is used
  • The machine you are compiling for

Most importantly, don't make assumption about how the code is going to be compiled at all, just compile it and see. If you want to know what is best at this fine grained level: apply the relevant flags, compile, look at the assembly of the generated code, benchmark it, and only then ask yourself questions like "how could this be compiled more efficiently?", "what could have I done in order to generate different/faster code?", "should I just write better inline ASM myself?".

In godbolt, the assembly says call memcpy even if it should be inlined.

Again, this does not mean much without knowing the exact code, compiler and compilation flags. No good compiler would leave a call memcpy when it can be clearly optimized to be faster. You can see it in this Godbolt example.

gcc x.c               gcc -O3 x.c

mov     edx, 128      movdqu  xmm0, XMMWORD PTR [rsp]
mov     rsi, rcx      movdqu  xmm1, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+16]
mov     rdi, rax      lea     rdi, [rsp+1024]
call    memcpy        movdqu  xmm2, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+32]
                      movdqu  xmm3, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+48]
                      movdqu  xmm4, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+64]
                      movdqu  xmm5, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+80]
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1024], xmm0
                      movdqu  xmm6, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+96]
                      movdqu  xmm7, XMMWORD PTR [rsp+112]
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1040], xmm1
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1056], xmm2
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1072], xmm3
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1088], xmm4
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1104], xmm5
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1120], xmm6
                      movups  XMMWORD PTR [rsp+1136], xmm7
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  • Suppose I'm just using GCC and Linux.
    – user13783520
    Jul 25 '20 at 22:31
  • @user13783520 not enough info. If you want a definitive answer you'll have to at least provide everything I said above. Only "GCC and Linux" does not suffice. I can only suggest you to 1) use optimizations, 2) look at the generated code, 3) profile it. Jul 25 '20 at 22:33

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