40

I want to call up an editor in a python script to solicit input from the user, much like crontab e or git commit does.

Here's a snippet from what I have running so far. (In the future, I might use $EDITOR instead of vim so that folks can customize to their liking.)

tmp_file = '/tmp/up.'+''.join(random.choice(string.ascii_uppercase + string.digits) for x in range(6))
edit_call = [ "vim",tmp_file]
edit = subprocess.Popen(edit_call,stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True )   

My problem is that by using Popen, it seems to keep my i/o with the python script from going into the running copy of vim, and I can't find a way to just pass the i/o through to vim. I get the following error.

Vim: Warning: Output is not to a terminal
Vim: Warning: Input is not from a terminal

What's the best way to call a CLI program from python, hand control over to it, and then pass it back once you're finished with it?

69

Calling up $EDITOR is easy. I've written this kind of code to call up editor:

import sys, tempfile, os
from subprocess import call

EDITOR = os.environ.get('EDITOR','vim') #that easy!

initial_message = "" # if you want to set up the file somehow

with tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(suffix=".tmp") as tf:
  tf.write(initial_message)
  tf.flush()
  call([EDITOR, tf.name])

  # do the parsing with `tf` using regular File operations.
  # for instance:
  tf.seek(0)
  edited_message = tf.read()

The good thing here is, the libraries handle creating and removing the temporary file.

  • Brilliant! My one modification is to add a fallback in case EDITOR is not set: EDITOR = os.environ.get('EDITOR') if os.environ.get('EDITOR') else 'vim'. I've submitted this as an edit to your, if you wish to accept it. – sam Jun 10 '11 at 19:25
  • Thanks @sam and @unutbu for suggestions. I didn't know you could get away with an unset $EDITOR :) – souser12345 Jun 10 '11 at 20:40
  • 9
    I had to re-open the file with with open(tf.name) to get at the updated file contents. Otherwise, I was just getting the same contents as initial_message – Paul May 16 '16 at 5:52
  • 1
    @progo Mac OSX El Capitan, VIM. Interesting – Paul May 16 '16 at 20:05
  • 5
    I ran into the same problem of reading back the old contents of the file, and its true that in many cases, vim moves the old file aside and writes the new file, leaving our tf file descriptor still open on the now-backup file. The command line option "+set backupcopy=yes" added before the file name prevents this problem, and I'm now happily able to read the new contents of the file. call([EDITOR, '+set backupcopy=yes', tf.name]) – Chuck Buche Nov 22 '16 at 6:56
6

In python3: 'str' does not support the buffer interface

$ python3 editor.py
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "editor.py", line 9, in <module>
    tf.write(initial_message)
  File "/usr/lib/python3.4/tempfile.py", line 399, in func_wrapper
    return func(*args, **kwargs)
TypeError: 'str' does not support the buffer interface

For python3, use initial_message = b"" to declare the buffered string.

Then use edited_message.decode("utf-8") to decode the buffer into a string.

import sys, tempfile, os
from subprocess import call

EDITOR = os.environ.get('EDITOR','vim') #that easy!

initial_message = b"" # if you want to set up the file somehow

with tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(suffix=".tmp") as tf:
    tf.write(initial_message)
    tf.flush()
    call([EDITOR, tf.name])

    # do the parsing with `tf` using regular File operations.
    # for instance:
    tf.seek(0)
    edited_message = tf.read()
    print (edited_message.decode("utf-8"))

Result:

$ python3 editor.py
look a string
  • receiving blank chars back. Trying instead print(edited_message) results in b'' returned. This is with Python 3.5.2 via OS X Terminal – ljs.dev Dec 8 '16 at 17:00
3

The PIPE is the problem. VIM is an application that depends on the fact that the stdin/stdout channels are terminals and not files or pipes. Removing the stdin/stdout paramters worked for me.

I would avoid using os.system as it should be replaced by the subprocess module.

  • Thanks dmeister. However it doesn't work for me. I have the following code. Is this what you meant? edit_call = [ "vim",tmp_file]; edit = subprocess.Popen(edit_call) – sam Jun 10 '11 at 17:05
  • @sam Yes, that is what I meant – dmeister Jun 10 '11 at 17:08
  • @Sam What is happening? – dmeister Jun 10 '11 at 17:26
  • 1
    After running that code, it brings up vim, but I can't interact with it. After typing a couple characters, vim disappears, and I'm left with Vim: Error reading input, exiting... and then Vim: Finished.. This leaves me still inside a process. After typing a space or enter (no prompt, yet), I get the following and then returned to the command-prompt: -bash: 1: command not found – sam Jun 10 '11 at 18:25
  • For future users, and maybe for @sam you just need a .wait() on the end of it. – TheSchwa Jul 31 at 16:09
3

Package python-editor:

$ pip install python-editor
$ python
>>> import editor
>>> result = editor.edit(contents="text to put in editor\n")

More details here: https://github.com/fmoo/python-editor

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