abstract class A<T> where T:A<T>
{
    public event Action<T> Event1;
}

class B : A<B>
{
    //has a field called Action<B> Event1;
}

Is there a more elegant way to do this? I want stuff (events, etc) in the base class to be able to use the subclass' type.

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The pattern you are using does not actually implement the constraint you want. Suppose you want to model "an animal can only be friendly with something of its own kind":

abstract class Animal<T> where T : Animal<T>
{
    public abstract void GetFriendly(T t);
}

class Cat : Animal<Cat>
{
    public override void GetFriendly(Cat cat) {}
}

Have we succeeded in implementing the desired constraint? No.

class EvilDog : Animal<Cat>
{
    public override void GetFriendly(Cat cat) {}
}

Now an evil dog can be friendly with any Cat, and not friendly with other evil dogs.

The type constraint you want is not possible in the C# type system. Try Haskell if you need this sort of constraint enforced by the type system.

See my article on this subject for more details:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/02/03/curiouser-and-curiouser.aspx

  • I think that you point out an important limitation, but depending on the actual requirements this may or may not be a serious issue. For instance, if this is being used only within one's own codebase it may be stylistically obvious if the pattern is being implemented correctly. – kvb Jun 10 '11 at 23:31
  • Interesting take on this. I completely disagree. There is a simple resolution to the problem you perceive exists with this technique. blog.theobjectguy.com/2011/06/… – TheObjectGuy Jun 22 '11 at 2:36

What you have works very well. In fact it's very similar to other .NET interfaces and types where you want the interface implementer to use your type, like:

public class MyClass : IEqualityComparer<MyClass>
{
    // From the interface IEqualityComparer
    public bool Equals(MyClass other) { ... }

    ...
}

I don't think you need to specify where T:A.

T will be B when you use class B:A

This is also known as CRTP or Curiously recurring template pattern and is a known idiom.

Since A is abstract, you can add abstract methods to A and invoke them from A and B, which will be forced to implement the method, will be the invoker:

abstract class A<T> where T:A
{
    public event Action<T> Event1;
    public abstract void Method();

    public A(){Method();}
}

class B : A<B>
{
    //has a field called Action<B> Event1;
    public void Method(){ //stuff }
}

On instantiation of B, the base class constructor will call Method() which is only implemented in B, forcing B's instance to be called.

This allows A to invoke subclass specific methods without requiring A to have specific knowledge of Children. The downside is that ALL children must implement Method or re-abstract it to their own children.

My most recent question was marked as a duplicate of this one. I totally agree on that matter. So I came here to take a look at the answers and to read Eric's post on that (very interesting indeed). You can not enforce this at compile time with the type system but you can do this at runtime. The way I implemented this is:

abstract class FooBase<T>
{
    protected FooBase()
    {
        if (typeof(T) != GetType())
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }
    }
}

By doing this we can plant the seed of an evil dog, but that dog will be aborted at runtime.

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