0

How does one use chisquare_test_homogeneity (x, y, c)? Can you give an example.

chisquare_test_homogeneity (x, y, c) Given two samples x and y, perform a chisquare test for homogeneity of the null hypothesis that x and y come from the same distribution, based on the partition induced by the (strictly increasing) entries of c.

I tried calling it as below but seem my inputs are wrong.

x = poissrnd(2, [1,100]); #generate 100 poisson 
y = poissrnd(3, [1, 100]); #another 100 poisson
bins = [0:10];
chisquare_test_homogeneity(x, y, bins); #NaN?
| |
  • I agree, it's very cryptic. Might be worth opening a bug report on that. Having said that, a homogeneity test is fairly easy to do by hand. – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 27 at 9:47
  • by hand? my understanding is that it is equivalent to a chi-square independence test. – ABC Analytics Jul 27 at 13:39
  • Conceptually they are different things, but, computationally-speaking, yes, that's my understanding too. – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 27 at 16:06
  • By the way, how is the chi2 independence test for homogeneity different from using Mann-Whitney? – ABC Analytics Aug 1 at 10:04
  • 1
1

Have a look at the code in chisquare-test-homogeneity.m. It's not a big file. I'm copying it below (bold emphasis mine):

c     = [(reshape (c, 1, df)), Inf];
l_x   = length (x);
x     = reshape (x, l_x, 1);
n_x   = sum (x * ones (1, df+1) < ones (l_x, 1) * c);
l_y   = length (y);
y     = reshape (y, l_y, 1);
n_y   = sum (y * ones (1, df+1) < ones (l_y, 1) * c);
chisq = l_x * l_y * sum ((n_x/l_x - n_y/l_y).^2 ./ (n_x + n_y));
pval  = 1 - chi2cdf (chisq, df);

My reading of that code is that X and Y are expected to consist of numbers, e.g. integers, where each unique integer represents a particular class.

C then seems to expect a vector of 'partition points', i.e. numbers that are "between" those integers, clearly separating the classes. Note in the bold parts above, that a strict inequality is used, rather than <=, therefore your partitions should not co-inside with the numbers (e.g. integers) used in X and Y.

The code also implies that you should not have a 'partition' number that is below the lowest integer in X or y, since that would lead to a division by zero. (bug?)

It also implies that if you have values in 1:10, then C should be something like 0.5:9.5 rather than 0.5:10.5, since the code adds an extra argument Inf to C, to cover all the values, and therefore the 10.5 partition would also try to count any numbers between 10.5 and Inf, introducing a class that doesn't exist (i.e. assumed not to have occured in either X and Y).

It also implies that the C variable could be used to 'group together' groups if you like, e.g. if X and Y take values in the range 1:10, you could specify a partition C = [0.5, 1.5, 9.5], which would treat 1 as one class, 2:9 as another, and 10 as the third class.

Obviously none of this is documented, this is just conclusions from studying the m-file directly.

So, regarding your example, I would run it like this:

x = poissrnd(2, [1,100]); #generate 100 poisson 
y = poissrnd(3, [1, 100]); #another 100 poisson
c = 0.5 : ( max([x,y]) - 0.5 );
chisquare_test_homogeneity(x, y, c);

Having said that, this seems to be some sort of 'cumulative' definition of the chisquare test that I'm not familiar with, and my interpretation above could be wrong. So I would simply rephrase the problem as an 'independence' chi square test, which is much easier to understand intuitively:

C = 1:max([x,y]);                    % define available classes (integers)
X = sum( x.' == C, 1 );              % get number of counts per class
Y = sum( y.' == C, 1 );              % get number of counts per class
chisquare_test_independence ([X;Y])  % perform test on contingency table
| |
  • 1
    In theory the two formulations above should have given the same result, but they don't. Submitted as a bug in the octave tracker savannah.gnu.org/bugs/index.php?58838 (at the very least, if I misinterpreted how the homogeneity test works, then this function is in need of some serious documentation ... ) – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 27 at 17:11
  • thanks. Very helpful. Good to at least know it doesn't work, so I can forget about it and write something myself which I try to avoid whenever possible. surprised I can't find (yet) a built-in function for testing X against some common distributions in R, as chisq.test() assumes a fully-specified distribution for df. – ABC Analytics Jul 28 at 2:10
0

I wrote something for personal use, verbosely as I am a beginner. For comparing some data X against a common distribution null hypothesis.

#purpose: to test if some observed data can be said to come from a common distribution (so-called goodness of fit test)
#signature: chisq_test_distribution(observed, distribution, bins)
#arguments: observed is observed data in vector. distribution is octave distribution function name in string(poiss for Poisson, norm for normal etc). bins is a vector for grouping data, use cell array {} when a range.
#descriptions: the test is based on "sum (Observed i - Expected i).^2 / Expected i ~ chisquare(k -1 - para)", with continuous distributions discretized instead of Kolmogorov-Smirnov.
#assumptions: the observed data are i.i.d.
#output: realised observations, probability vector, expected observations, chi-square, p-value, degree of freedom in octave structure format (equivalent to dictionary)
#dependency: 
#reference: https://app.box.com/s/tl4yklizh6b8xyiq6dpbmj4az4e8ioj3
#others: octave has not implemented the goodness of fit test chi2gof() function of matlab, its chisquare_test_homogeneity(x, y c) is weird.
  
function output= chisq_test_distribution(observed, distribution, bins)
  
  #listing distribution functions supported, adding gradually
  distribution_supported = {"norm", "poiss", "unif"};
  
  #checking arguments entered correctly and converting formats
  assert(ismatrix(observed) && rows(observed) == 1, "observed data should be a 1xn matrix");   
  assert(ismatrix(bins) && rows(bins) == 1, "bins should be a 1xn matrix or cell array");   
  assert(ischar(distribution), "distribution name should be entered as string");    
  distribution = tolower(distribution);
  assert(any(strcmp(distribution, distribution_supported)),"distribution entered isn't recognized or not yet supported");
  if !iscell(bins) #if bins is a vector, convert it to a cell format
      bins = num2cell(bins);    #it could be a vector, just this function is coded to loop a cell
  endif  
  
  #variables declaration
  k = length(bins); #number of bin groups
  n = length(observed); #number of observations  
    
  #setting distribution parameter estimates and discrete vs continuous
  switch (distribution)
      case "norm"
          is_discrete = 0;  #indicator for discrete or continuous distribution
          mu = mean(observed); 
          var = var(observed, 0); #compute variance with (n-1) in denominator
          args = [mu, var]; #vector holding function parameters in signature-order
      case "poiss"
          is_discrete = 1;
          lambda = mean(observed); #unbiased estimator
          args = [lambda];
      case "unif"
          is_discrete = 0;
          a = min(observed) * (n/(n+1)); #estimate a of uniform[a,b] by correcting for the MLE bias 
          b = max(observed) * ((n+1)/n); #estimate b of uniform[a,b] by correcting for the MLE bias
          args = [a, b];   
      otherwise
          disp("internal error");
          return;         
  endswitch  
  
  #calling helper method to obtain a probability vector under null_hypothesis and observations count vector
  histogram = histogramize(distribution, bins, is_discrete, args, observed); #calling a helper function defined below
  probability = histogram{1}; #first cell array is a probability vector
  observations = histogram{2}; #second cell array is a observation vector
  
  #calculate the test statistics and return results
  expected = n .* probability; #expected observations if this distribution hypothesis is true
  chisq = sum((observations - expected).^2 ./ expected, 2); #Pearson chi-square statistics 
  df = k - 1 - length(args); #chi-square degree of freedom
  pvalue = 1 - chi2cdf(chisq, df); 
  output =  struct("observed", observations, "expected", expected, "probabilities", probability, "chisquare", chisq, "pvalue", pvalue, "df", df, "parameter estimates", args); 
  if (any(expected<=5))
     display("expected observations for each bin should exceed 5 for chi-square approximation, combining bins if possible is suggested.");
  endif
  return;
  
endfunction

function output= histogramize(distribution, bins, is_discrete, args, observed) #helper method to collect observations and calculate null_hypothesis probabilities according to bins
    #high-level calculations are equivalent for discrete/continuous, but low-level procedures differ, separate them for better code clarity
    #for a discrete distribution, observations are counted and probabilities calculated using equality at each bin value 
    #for a continuous distribution, we first discretize it by requiring each bin to contain a range for counting observations and calculating probabilities, within the range, not at equality   
    if (is_discrete == 1) 
        output = histogramize_discrete(distribution, bins, args, observed);
    else
        output = histogramize_continuous(distribution, bins, args, observed);
    endif
    return;
endfunction

function output= histogramize_discrete(distribution, bins, args, observed) #helper for helper method
     k = length(bins); #number of bin groups
     args_number = length(args); #number of parameter to be estimated
     probability = [];
     observations = [];
     probability_function = strcat(distribution, "pdf"); #probability function name 
     #looping through each bin as well as elements within each bin (this bin) to collect observations and probabilities, then sum over inner values as each outer value
    for i=1:k   #outer loop for each bin entry
        this_bin = bins{1, i}; #entry for this bin, which can be a single value or multiple values
        observations(1, i) = sum(histc(observed, this_bin)); #count and sum over number of observations belonging to this bin
                switch [args_number] #function signature differs by number of arguments
                    case 1 
                        probability(1, i) = sum( feval(probability_function, this_bin, args(1)) );
                    case 2 
                        probability(1, i) = sum( feval(probability_function, this_bin, args(1), args(2)) );
                    case 3 
                        probability(1, i) = sum( feval(probability_function, this_bin, args(1), args(2), args(3)) );
                   otherwise
                       display("there are distribution functions having more than 3 arguments?");     
                endswitch   
    endfor
    output = {probability, observations}; #return as a cell array
    return;  
endfunction

function output= histogramize_continuous(distribution, bins, args, observed) #helper for helper method
    #checking inputs are properly formatted
    assert(iscell(bins), "continuous distribution should have bins as ranges inputted in a cell array {}.");
    assert(all(cellfun("length", bins) == 2), "for a continuous distribution, each bin should have 2 values to represent a range.");
    lower_range = cellfun("min", bins);  #grab the lower endpoints for each bin
    upper_range = cellfun("max", bins);  #grab the upper endpoints for each bin
    lower_range = lower_range(:, 2:length(lower_range)); #shift the first lower endpoint off
    upper_range = upper_range(:, 1:length(upper_range)-1); #shift the last upper endpoint off
    assert( all(lower_range>=upper_range), "bin ranges should not overlap.") #ensure the lower endpoints of bin i are above the upper endpoints of bin i-1, equality is forgiven
     
     k = length(bins); #number of bin groups
     args_number = length(args); #number of parameter to be estimated
     probability = [];
     observations = [];
     probability_function = strcat(distribution, "cdf"); #probability function name 
     #looping through each bin to grab the range inside to count observations and calculate probabilities
     for i=1:k
         this_bin = bins{1,i}; #a range         
         observations(1, i) = sum( histc(observed, this_bin) ); #sum over observations falling between endpoints
         switch(args_number) #function signature differs by number of arguments
              case 1 
                    probability(1, i) = feval(probability_function, this_bin(2), args(1)) - feval(probability_function, this_bin(1), args(1));
             case 2 
                    probability(1, i) =  feval(probability_function, this_bin(2), args(1), args(2)) - feval(probability_function, this_bin(1), args(1), args(2));
             case 3 
                    probability(1, i) =  feval(probability_function, this_bin(2), args(1), args(2), args(3)) - feval(probability_function, this_bin(1), args(1), args(2), args(3));
             otherwise
                    display("there are distribution functions having more than 3 arguments?");    
         endswitch         
     endfor
     output = {probability, observations}; #return as a cell array
     return;    
endfunction   
#purpose: for observations classified by two dimensions, test if these two dimensions can be said to be independent (so-called contingency table test)
#signature: chisq_test_independence(X)
#arguments: X is a matrix representing two factors (dimensions/features/classes), namely a row factor and a column factor, with each row (column) for a possible row (column) factor value or level, so (i, j) is an observation of level i of the row factor and level j of the column factor 
#descriptions: the test is based on sum (Observed ij - Expected ij).^2 / Expected ij ~ chisquare(rc-r-c +1), where r = # of rows, c = # of columns and that Expected ij is the expected observation under independence hypothesis 
#assumptions: independent observations 
#output: probability vectors, expected observations, chi-square, p-value, degree of freedom in octave structure format (equivalent to dictionary)
#dependency: statistics
#reference: https://app.box.com/s/bja2138o9f5eqaydpr8z0nrtxdhl6ynw 
#others: can also be used to test the hypothesis that multiple discrete (or discretized) distributions are equal, by setting values as one factor and distributions as another factor as distributions being equal is equivalent to the population and value factors being independent of each other

function output= chisq_test_independence(data)  

    pkg load statistics; #load statistics package for nansum() 
    
    assert(ismatrix(data), "please enter a matrix");
    
    #setting variables
    r = rows(data); #number of row levels
    c = columns(data); #number of column levels
    n = nansum(data(:)); #sum of all observations
    
    #getting probabilities under null hypothesis 
    prob_r = nansum(data, 2) ./ n; #estimated probability vector for row factor
    prob_c = nansum(data, 1) ./ n; #estimated probability vector for column vector
    prob = prob_r  * prob_c; #estimated probability matrix under independence hypothesis
    
    #calculating the chisquare test statistics 
    df = (r - 1) .* (c - 1) ; #degree of freedom is (rc - r - c + 1)
    expected = n .* prob; #expected observations under independence hypothesis
    T = ( (data - expected).^2 )  ./ expected ; #test statistics to be summed over
    chisq = sum(T(:)) ;     #test statistics  
    pvalue = 1 - chi2cdf(chisq, df) ;
    
    output = struct("row_probability", prob_r, "column_probability", prob_c, "probability", prob, "expected", expected, "chisquare", chisq, "pvalue", pvalue, "df", df) ; #return output using octave structure format
    return;
    
endfunction
    
| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.