0

I am writing a "vending machine" program and I need to have 5 items where 3 items cost an integer amount and the other 2 cost a decimal amount.

I am only using if statements in this code, but there is an error with my cost variable.

What did I do wrong?

Code below:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {

  cout << "Vending Machine" << endl;
  cout << "----Items------" << endl;
  cout << "1. Popcorn: $2" << endl;
  cout << "2. Coconut Clusters: $3" << endl;
  cout << "3. Granola Bar: $2.50" << endl;
  cout << "4. Trail Mix: $1.50" << endl;
  cout << "5. Chocolate: $1" << endl;

  cout << "Enter you selection: " << flush;
  int input;
  cin >> input;


  if (input == 1) {
    cout << "You added Popcorn to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 2;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
  }
  
  if (input == 2) {
    cout << "You added Coconut Clusters to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 3;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
  }
  
  if (input == 3) {
    cout << "You added Granola Bar to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 2.50;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
  }

  if (input == 4) {
    cout << "You added Trail Mix to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 1.50;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
  }

  if (input == 5) {
    cout << "You added Chocolate to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 1;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
  } 

  

  cout << "Pay amount: " << flush;
  float money;
  cin >> money;

  if (money > cost) {
    float change = money-cost;
    cout << "Thank you! You have $" << change << " change." << endl;
  }

  if (money == cost) {
    cout << "Thank you! Have a nice day!." << endl;
  }

  if (money < cost) {
    float amountOwed = cost-money;
    cout << "Please insert another $" << amountOwed << endl;

    cout << "Enter amount: " << flush;
    float payment;
    cin >> payment;

    if (payment > amountOwed) {
    float change2 = payment-cost;
    cout << "Thank you! You have $" << change2 << " change." << endl;
    }

    if (payment == amountOwed) {
      cout << "Thank you! Have a nice day!." << endl;
    }

    if (payment < amountOwed) {
      cout << "Sorry, you did not enter enough money. Your cart has emptied." << endl;
    }

  }
  return 0;
}
2
  • 2
    Look at scope of your variables. – Jarod42 Jul 26 '20 at 18:49
  • You can declare a variable anywhere. How long it lives is defined by scope. In this case your cost variable are only alive inside the '{}` inside the if block. – Martin York Jul 27 '20 at 18:14
5

The problem is that you are doing the following:

int main()
{
    [...]
    if (input == 1) {
        cout << "You added Popcorn to your cart." << endl;
        float cost = 2;
        cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
    }
    [...]
    if (money > cost) {
        [...]
    }
    [...]
}

The scope of the variable cost is limited to the if block, because that is where you declare it. Therefore, the variable does not exist anymore when you evaluate the expression money > cost.

To fix this, you should instead declare the variable cost in the main block scope of the function, like this:

int main()
{
    float cost;

    [...]
    if (input == 1) {
        cout << "You added Popcorn to your cart." << endl;
        cost = 2;
        cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
    }
    [...]
    if (money > cost) {
        [...]
    }
    [...]
}
2

Update: you've just changed your question to add float cost = 0; in a suitable place. Now you need to remove the float keyword from the attempted assignments inside each if (input == block: e.g. change float cost = 2.50; to cost = 2.50; so it changes the function-scope cost variable, instead of creating an extra if-scope variable.


Addressing your original problem...

Your if blocks...

if (input == 3) {
    cout << "You added Granola Bar to your cart." << endl;
    float cost = 2.50;
    cout << "Your total is $" << cost << endl;
}

...each create a float cost variable local to the scope of that if, so after the } the value of cost that you set is gone. Instead, you need to have:

float cost;

Before your first if (input == ... statement, so its lifetime extends to the end of the enclosing function scope (i.e. until main() returns).

2
  • Please note that meanwhile, someone else has edited the question and has reverted OP's edit to the code mentioned in your "update", thereby invalidating your "update". I think this edit by someone else was appropriate, because OP's changes invalidated both your answer and my answer. But I'm afraid that now you will have to update your "update". – Andreas Wenzel Jul 27 '20 at 14:41
  • @AndreasWenzel: thanks for the heads-up. I think I"ll just delete my answer soon - you have this covered. Cheers – Tony Delroy Jul 27 '20 at 15:55
2

"Can I declare a variable in an “if statement”?"

Yes. For example:

if (auto foo = bar())

The variable foo will be valid inside the body of the if statement and will be initialized to whatever bar() returns and the body of the if will be entered if foo converts to a bool value of true.

Since C++17 you can also do:

if (auto foo = bar(); foo == 42)

Again, the variable foo will be declared and valid inside the if and initialized by bar(), but you now have more control over when to enter the if body.

3
  • I'm afraid the OP has invalided your answer by changing the title of the question. – Andreas Wenzel Jul 26 '20 at 19:44
  • @AndreasWenzel Seems you are right. I'll still leave it here, in case someone else needs an answer to the original question. – Jesper Juhl Jul 26 '20 at 19:47
  • Meanwhile, someone else has edited the question and restored the original title, so your question is no longer invalidated. But now we have the same problem as before, namely that the question title does not correspond to the question text. – Andreas Wenzel Jul 27 '20 at 14:37
2

When I try to compile your code, I get the following error message:

Error: ‘cost’ was not declared in this scope

In order to fix this error, you just need to declare cost variable in the function's main block scope, for example like this:

int main()
{
    float cost;

    [...]
}
3
  • 1
    Thank you so much! I added that in my code but now the change is not properly computed. For example, when i pay $1 for a $3 item, the change is $1 instead of owing $2. Do you have any idea why? – yeliah Jul 26 '20 at 18:57
  • @AyushJain: It was a pleasure to help you. I believe your answer would have received more upvotes if you had also posted code, in order to illustrate what you were saying. That is probably the reason why my answer received more upvotes than yours. People normally like to see a nice mixture of code and text explaining the code. :-) However, I am sometimes too lazy to do that and just write a short answer (which gives me less upvotes). But you don't have to change your answer now to add code, I just wanted to tell you how to get more upvotes in future answers. – Andreas Wenzel Jul 27 '20 at 19:16
  • I have made some slight changes to your answer, to illustrate what you are saying with code. If you don't like my changes, feel free to revert them. – Andreas Wenzel Jul 27 '20 at 19:42

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