6

In Python3.8 There is new operator called walrus which can assign new variables inside a condition. Is there something similar to it in Node.Js ?

my_var = 5
if (result := my_var == 5):
    print(result)
4

There's no need for a separate operator, assignment is already an expression in Javascript:

"use strict";
var my_var = 5;
var result;
if (result = my_var == 5){
  console.log(result)
}
6
  • 1
    This won't work in strict mode, which is what anyone in their right mind will be using.
    – Slbox
    Jul 27 '20 at 19:13
  • I use strict mode often for debugging. Jul 27 '20 at 19:14
  • @Slbox fine, but the point still stands. assignment is an expression, even in strict mode. Jul 27 '20 at 19:14
  • Considering that such an assignment is an error, that's a rather stubborn response. There's nothing wrong with your answer but that's a silly thing to start debating.
    – Slbox
    Jul 27 '20 at 19:18
  • @Slbox what do you mean it's an error? It's not an error. This is a normal part of the language, it is similar to the C behavior for assignment. Try this, even in strict mode. Jul 27 '20 at 19:19
4

Assign and compare as one expression. To make it work in strict mode and avoid linter complaints, add parentheses to the assignment.

const my_var = 5;
let result;
if ((result = my_var) === 5) {
  console.log(result);
}

https://eslint.org/docs/rules/no-cond-assign#except-parens

1
  • The parens were a great pointer; helped me arrive at the following: (t['v'] ?? (t['v'] = [])).push(1);
    – Schalton
    Sep 16 at 5:04
1

You can do it like this:

const myNumber = 2;
let newNumber;

if (newNumber = myNumber === 2) {
  console.log('this works!');
}

It's kind of the same, it has an assignment and a comparison in the same line. You can obviously substitute your problem with this:

const my_var = 5;
let result;
if(result = my_var === 5) {
 console.log(result);
}

As you can see it's obligatory to have a let declaration before-hand.

0

This can't work unless you're not using strict mode. It's to prevent mistakes.

You can see this part of the document on MDN for more info

You can do what @juanpa.arrivillaga mentioned if you don't use strict mode, which I strongly advise again. Strict mode will save you 100x more headache than it will make you.

1
  • 1
    I didn't downvote, but as I noted in my comment, even in strict mode, assignment is still an expression in javascript... nothing in that link contradicts that. Jul 27 '20 at 19:18

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