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Folks,

I have 2 sets of coding sample for each case. Can you kindly tell me which set to use and why particular that set over the other ? I really have to learn why the other set is abhored.

Q1. sets regarding mysqli_stmt_execute(). Which set to keep ?

SET 1

if(mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt) === FALSE)
{
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}

SET 2

$stmt_execute = mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

if($stmt_execute === FALSE)
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}

Q2. 2 sets regarding mysqli_stmt_bind_result(). Which set to keep ?

SET 1

if($bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,$page_url,$link_anchor_text,$page_description,$keyphrase,$keywords)); 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}

SET 2

$bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,$page_url,$link_anchor_text,$page_description,$keyphrase,$keywords);

if($bind_result === FALSE) 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}   

Q3. 2 sets regarding mysqli_stmt_fetch(). Which set to keep ?

SET 1

if($stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt))
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}

SET 2

$stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt);
    
if($stmt_fetch === FALSE) 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}   

For my learning purpose, do mention what is wrong with the sets you do not recommend and what kind of problems I would face should I ever use them out of mistake.

Anything else I should know, you are welcome to mention.

Thanks

UPDATE: Folks, after test, I get these following results ...

if($bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,$page_url,$link_anchor_text,$page_description,$keyphrase,$keywords)); 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}

47Error: . Error: 0.

QA. What does the error mean and why I getting it ? I need answers.

So now, I have no choice but to stick to SET 2 as it shows no error:

$bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,$page_url,$link_anchor_text,$page_description,$keyphrase,$keywords);

if($bind_result === FALSE) 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}
if($stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)) //Q11. SHOULD I KEEP THIS IF OR THE IF THAT COMES BEFORE THIS IF ? 
            {
                echo __LINE__;
                printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
                printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
                die;
            }

68Error: . Error: 0.

QA. What does the error mean and why I getting it ? I need answers.

So now, I have no choice but to stick to SET 2 as it shows no error:

$stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt);         

if($stmt_fetch === FALSE) //Q11. SHOULD I KEEP THIS IF OR THE IF THAT COMES AFTER THIS IF ? 
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}   

QB). What I have learnt from the above is that the long version shows errors:

if($bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result())
if($stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt))

And so, have to use short versions as they don't show error:

$bind_result = mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt,$page_url,$link_anchor_text,$page_description,$keyphrase,$keywords);

if($bind_result === FALSE)
$stmt_fetch = mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt);         

if($stmt_fetch === FALSE) 

But wait! How come this following long version works aswell the short version ? What is the mystery ? I definitely need answer to this one!

if(mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt) === FALSE)
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}
$stmt_execute = mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

if($stmt_execute === FALSE)
{
    echo __LINE__;
    printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));
    printf("Error: %d.\n", mysqli_stmt_errno($stmt));
    die;
}
  • 2
    Personally, I'd step back a bit, worry less about which syntax to use here - it's largely an opinion question - and consider just using PDO with exceptions turned on. – ceejayoz Jul 30 at 13:39
  • 4
  • 2
    This whole question is based on a false premise that you should check the return value of each of these methods. Don't! It's a terrible idea to manually check for errors. – Dharman Jul 30 at 13:40
  • 2
    procedural style shouldn't be used with mysqli is it fails to report errors properly. just write it the object style, it's really simple. and with object style you just remove all error checking at all. – Your Common Sense Jul 30 at 13:57
  • 2
    Sadly, all these tutorials are outdated. The PHP manual is telling you so simply because it doesn't want to go at lengths explaining you the proper error reporting. It doesn't make the examples any good though. Do not look at silly examples. Look at the real sites. NO good site EVER does weird things such as printf("Error: %s.\n", mysqli_stmt_error($stmt));. So shouldn't you. – Your Common Sense Jul 30 at 16:09

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