1

Child class:

interface Props {
    name: string;
    mac: string;
}

export const BluetoothDeviceItem = (Props, { }) => {
    const [connectingState, setConnectingState] = useState('not_connected');
    useEffect(() => {
        stateChangeCallback();
    }, [connectingState]);

    const { onClick } = Props;

    const stateChangeCallback = () => {
        switch (connectingState) {
            case 'not_connected':
                console.log("not_connected!");
                break;
            case 'connecting':
                console.log("connecting!");
                break;
            case 'connected':
                console.log("connected!");
                break;
        }
    }

    const wait = async () => {
        setConnectingState('connecting');

        let ret = await onClick(Props.mac);
    }

    return (
        <IonItem lines="none" class="item-container" onClick={wait} id={Props.mac} >
        </IonItem>
    );
}

"Parent" class (not technically the parent because the elements are rendered in a different class)

class Bluetooth extends React.Component<{}, {}}> {
    scan() {
        for(let i = 0; i < 5; i++) { //using a for loop to pretend bluetooth devices are being found
            let a = <BluetoothDeviceItem key={i} mac={i.toString()} name={"device_"+i} onClick={this.connect}></BluetoothDeviceItem>
        
            bluetoothDevices.push(a); //bluetoothDevices is a *global*
        }  
    }
  
    connect = (id) => {
        bluetoothDevices.forEach(element => {
            //access the state of each element
        });
    }
}

I posted my code first to make it a bit easier to explain hopefully.

I have two classes. One is a child class (BlueoothDeviceItem). Within this class there is a state. It can have 3 values not_connected, connecting and connected. This code is stripped down but these states would change some icons and colours.

Then there's the "parent" class. This is everything to do with the bluetooth code. As I mention in the comment I use a for loop to pretend about devices being found. This simplifies the code a lot.
When scan is called, every time a device is found, a new child (BluetoothDeviceItem) is created with a name and a MAC address. Every one of these devices will default to not connected. When you click on one, it uses that on click event to call the parent's function (connect). I believe the best practise for Bluetooth code is to do everything yourself. That includes disconnecting the devices and so on, so as not to rely on the device to do so (at least according to the documentation it is good practise for some parts). Bluetooth also only allows for 1 connection at a time. That of course means I need to disconnect any currently connected Bluetooth devices when a user tries to connect to one.
Since I have 3 states in my child class I thought these would be the best things to use. When a user connects to a device, I loop through all devices. If any have the states connecting or connected then you disconnect those devices.
However the issue with that is you can't access states since they are private to that class. I also tried props but props are read-only so I wouldn't be able to modify them. The last thing I tried was refs:

class Bluetooth extends React.Component<{}, {}> {
    ref: any;

    constructor({}) {
        super({});

        this.ref = React.createRef();
    }

    scan() {
        for(let i = 0; i < 5; i++) { //using a for loop to pretend bluetooth devices are being found
            let a = <BluetoothDeviceItem key={i} mac={i.toString()} name={"device_"+i} onClick={this.connect} elRef={this.ref}></BluetoothDeviceItem>
        
            bluetoothDevices.push(a); //bluetoothDevices is a *global*
        }  
    }
  
    connect = (id) => {
        bluetoothDevices.forEach(element => {
            this.ref.current.state //doesn't work since it's a DOM element.
            this.ref.current.getState() //also doesnt work
        });
    }
}

While also changing the interface to:

interface Props {
    name: string;
    mac: string;
    elRef: any;
}

and the IonItem to:

<IonItem lines="none" class="item-container" onClick={wait} id={Props.mac} ref={Props.elRef} >

Due to it being a DOM element, I can't use this.ref.current.state. The last thing I tried was:

<IonItem lines="none" class="item-container" onClick={wait} id={Props.mac} ref={Props.elRef} key={Props.mac} {...{"getState": () => console.log(connectingState)}}>

creating a getter function to return the state. This was the closest to what I needed and it did in fact return the state however it relied on all of the devices being the same state to change. I.E. If any 1 of the devices had the state not_connected then the function would return not_connected. It would only return connecting once all of the devices had the state connecting

1

You can maintain all the child state in the parent component. That will simplify things for you as well. Pass the states and handle events using methods defined in parent class as props to the children.

9
  • Could you provide an example of this or a link to an explanation please? – DreamingInsanity Jul 31 '20 at 10:33
  • @DreamingInsanity When I see a global variable mutated to store jsx I don't think it's possible to give any kind of answer. Please refer to the documentation – HMR Jul 31 '20 at 10:41
  • I'm missing something but why not? This is about accessing states not global variables. Sure it's probably an anti-pattern but I need to be able to access this array across the entire app, on every page. I am welcome to change it later. I only have 1 page at the moment so I don't even know if it works. – DreamingInsanity Jul 31 '20 at 10:45
  • 1
    @HMR I think I am going to try using Redux to manage my states. It seems like a good idea for what I want to do. – DreamingInsanity Jul 31 '20 at 11:38
  • 1
    @DreamingInsanity when you loop through all children, you need to maintain all the children individually. Have a look at this. codesandbox.io/s/modern-haze-8pk30?file=/src/Child.js – Chandradeepta Laha Jul 31 '20 at 11:55
0

In React when we have to pass data from parent to child we simply pass through props but when we Need to access Child's data in Parent we do that using callback functions. That function is defined in Parent which accepts arguments as you did.

  connect = (id) => {
    bluetoothDevices.forEach(element => {
        //access the state of each element
    });
  }

we pass this callback function in props to child and Child calls back that function providing props like this.

const { onClick } = Props;
<BluetoothDeviceItem onClick={() => onClick(id)} />

while calling callback in Child and passing arguments. Remember to use as arrow function because otherwise it will not take arguments that you want to pass to parent. In your case id is argument.

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