5

In GHC.Base the description of <**> runs:

A variant of <*> with the arguments reversed.

It is widely known that "reversed" in that case does not mean "flipped" as:

GHCi> [1, 2, 3] <**> [(^2), (+1)]
[1,2,4,3,9,4]
GHCi> [(^2), (+1)] <*> [1, 2, 3]
[1,4,9,2,3,4]

So, what does "reversed" mean?


Side note: there are applicative functors which have (<**>) = flip (<*>). For example, here is my proof for the reader ((->) e):

(->) e: f <**> g =
    = liftA2 (flip ($)) f g =
    = (flip ($) <$> f) <*> g =
    = \e -> ((flip ($) . f) e) (g e) =
    = \e -> flip ($) (f e) $ (g e) =
    = \e -> (g e) $ (f e) =
    = \e -> g e (f e) =
    = g <*> f. => (<**>) = flip (<*>).

4
  • 2
    Side note to your side note: functors such that (<**>) = flip (<*>) are known as commutative applicative functors (or commutative monads, if they happen to be monads as well).
    – duplode
    Jul 31, 2020 at 23:20
  • 1
    possibly better description could be "A variant of <*> with the arguments' roles reversed."
    – Will Ness
    Aug 14, 2020 at 9:10
  • @WillNess agreed. Truth be told, I would have gone even further writing some kind of a relation between <*> and <**> down, like this one: xf <**> ff = (&) <$> xf <*> ff. It would also add more clearance to the definition, as the right hand IS the definition, just in terms of <*>, not liftA2: liftA2 f xf yf = f <$> xf <*> yf. Aug 14, 2020 at 9:17
  • 1
    some like liftA2 better; (<*>) = liftA2 ($) and (<**>) = liftA2 (&) are perfectly nice and clear. and short. :)
    – Will Ness
    Aug 14, 2020 at 9:39

3 Answers 3

7

I recently added do-notation to the base documentation which makes it easier to compare <*> and <**>, notice how both of them run left-to-right and both of them return f a:

  fs <*> as
=
  do f <- fs
     a <- as
     pure (f a)

and

  as <**> fs
=
  do a <- as
     f <- fs
     pure (f a)

It is known and codified (Control.Applicative.Backwards) that applicatives can be run backwards , I have to cut this answer short. Li-yao Xia's answer with liftA2 ($) and liftA2 (&)

7

If we stay at the example of lists we can see through your examples how <**> behaves reverse.

The expression as <**> fs means something like

foreach a in as {
    foreach f in fs {
        add (f a) to result;
    }
}

and fs <*> as means something like

foreach f in fs {
    foreach a in as {
        add (f a) to result
    }
}

So as <**> fs results in [f1(a1), f2(a1), ..., fn(a1), f1(a2), ..., fn(a2), ...]

And fs <*> as result in [f1(a1), f1(a2), ... , f1(am), f2(a1), ...]

So the order of the loops is reversed.

2
  • 1
    yes! Functors are generalized loops [ f x | x <- xs]; Applicatives are generalized nested loops [ (x,y) | x <- xs, y <- ys]; Monads are generalized dynamically created nested loops [ (x,y) | x <- xs, y <- k x].
    – Will Ness
    Aug 14, 2020 at 9:21
  • or we could choose another base, with fmap f xs = [ f x | x <- xs], ap xs ys = [ x y | x <- xs, y <- ys], join xs = [ y | x <- xs, y <- x]. all these written with MonadComprehensions of course.
    – Will Ness
    Aug 14, 2020 at 12:58
6

One way to illustrate it symbolically is to compare their expressions in terms of liftA2:

(<*>)  = liftA2 (\f x -> f x)
(<**>) = liftA2 (\x f -> f x)
       = liftA2 (flip (\f x -> f x))
7
  • I guess that is what I used proving the equivalence of <**> and flip (<*>) for the reader. Jul 31, 2020 at 14:01
  • 1
    Perhaps use ($)?
    – dfeuer
    Aug 1, 2020 at 2:26
  • @dfeuer well, as far as I know, $ cannot be used in Control.Applicative. I guess it’s up to us whether we want to follow this rule outside the library or not. Aug 1, 2020 at 6:39
  • @ZhiltsoffIgor, is that some sort of joke? There might (I don't know) be issues using ($) in GHC.Base, but I can't imagine it's a problem elsewhere.
    – dfeuer
    Aug 1, 2020 at 14:36
  • @dfeuer From Control.Applicative: >NOTA BENE: Do NOT use ($) anywhere in this module! The type of ($) is slightly magical (it can return unlifted types), and it is wired in... You can view the full text if you follow the link I enclosed with my question in the first line (the first note in the module). The authors warn us about not using $ right under the definition of <**> once again. Aug 1, 2020 at 14:44

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