18

I make extensive use of member functions of one specific static class. Specifying the class name every time I call it's methods looks nasty...

Can I import a static class as a namespace to call its methods without specifying the class name C#?

1

3 Answers 3

22

The feature you were looking for was added within C# 6.0

It's called "Using Static".

Here's the link for more explanations and examples:
https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/archive/msdn-magazine/2014/special-issue/csharp-how-csharp-6-0-simplifies-clarifies-and-condenses-your-code

13

Yes, you can. C# 6 introduced new construct – the using static directive lets you import all the static members of a type, so that you can use those members unqualified:

using static ClassName;

for instance:

using System;

using static System.Console;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        WriteLine("test");
    }
}
10

If you mean import it such that it's methods are global, no.

You might want to look at extension methods though. They are static methods that, when their class's namespace is imported, show up as instance methods on the type of their first argument. See more here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

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  • 1
    Wow, extension methods! An unbelievable feature I've missed! Thanks a lot! My code can be made up much better with this...
    – Ivan
    Jun 12, 2011 at 0:06
  • It's this type of response that makes me love this site! I'd +1 again if I could. Jun 12, 2011 at 0:16
  • Dear Chris, may you ever visit Prague - I owe you a beer! I can't express how glad I am to know of this feature I've never knew of before! I am using it to turn my scary code into a real OOP eye candy now...
    – Ivan
    Jun 12, 2011 at 1:04
  • Glad to be a help, and if I am ever there maybe I'll take you up on it. Jun 12, 2011 at 2:16

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