1

I know this is a dumb question, and I can't understand how I got stuck, but here I am. In this code, when I try to access x outside of the scope it was declared (declared on the heap), it tells me that x is not declared in this scope .

{
    int * x = new int;
}
*x = 5; /// Error

I've never had this problem before. Shouldn't x exist until I call delete x;?

3
  • 5
    I've never had this problem before what kind of C++ were you using?... Jul 31 '20 at 16:41
  • I tried it in C++11 and C++17. I'm pretty sure it is just something that I forgot though
    – H-005
    Jul 31 '20 at 16:42
  • 1
    There are multiple concepts here which none of the answers so far are addressing properly. Scope determines where in the source code an identifier (a name) is visible. A separate concept, lifetime, is when during program execution an object may be used. For some objects, notably those with automatic storage duration, lifetime is tied to scope (the lifetime ceases to exist when execution of its associated block ends). But that does not mean you cannot access the object outside its scope. You can, as by accessing it in a subroutine that has received a pointer to it. Jul 31 '20 at 16:57
5

There is a difference between x (a pointer) and the thing it points to (an int).

The int is not "declared on the heap"- the heap is not a scope nor does it contain declarations. x, on the other hand, is just a normal variable on the stack that disappears when the execution of its containing block completes.

The int on the heap does continue to exist on the heap, but when you throw away x (the pointer) you have no way to access it and the int has leaked.

1
  • Phrasing about lifetime ending should be careful. The lifetime of an object with automatic storage duration ends when execution of its associated block ends (terminates completely), not merely when execution leaves the block, perhaps temporarily. For example, when a subroutine is called, execution of the block is suspended, the subroutine is executed, and, when the subroutine returns, execution of the block resumes. During that subroutine call (and anything else it calls), the object still exists and still may be accessed. Jul 31 '20 at 17:02
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Declaring something is different to initialize something, infact this:

{
    int * x = new int;
}
*x = 5; /// Error

Will never work (at least in in C++), but this:

int* x;
{
    x = new int;
}
*x = 5; 

will work, because the declaration and the use of x are in the same scope

4
  • Well, this would work the same with variables declared on the stack then. But the idea of the heap is that when you declare something, it doesn't get deleted unless you explicitly do so (delete keyword). Or am I just messing things up?
    – H-005
    Jul 31 '20 at 16:44
  • @H-005 just because something exists doesn't mean you can access it. Jul 31 '20 at 16:46
  • 1
    @H-005 infact x is inside the stack, is the thing that is pointing to that is in the heap, and this is why in your example you are getting a error, because since x is in the stack, when its scope ends, it will be deallocated Jul 31 '20 at 16:46
  • Oh. Thanks, I understand now. I can swear that I did something like this before, but I'm most probably messing stuff up
    – H-005
    Jul 31 '20 at 16:53
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The variable x is only accessible in the declared scope.

The allocated buffer remains until deleted regardless of the status of x, so memory leak will happen when x become unavailable before the buffer being deleted and before the pointer stored to x is copied to anywhere that is available outside the scope.

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  • This is why C++ smart pointers are such a great thing, they make memory leaks much less likely. Jul 31 '20 at 16:45
  • Re “The variable x is only accessible in the declared scope.”: The identifier “x” is only known in its scope. The object x is accessible potentially anywhere in the program (as by passing its address to a subroutine). Accessibility of objects is limited by lifetime, not by scope. Scope is where in program source code an identifier is visible. Lifetime is when an object “exists” in the C++ model. Jul 31 '20 at 16:54
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Why can't access a variable declared with new outside of the scope it was declared in?

Because language rules say that the scope of the variable name has ended:

[basic.scope.declarative]

Every name is introduced in some portion of program text called a declarative region, which is the largest part of the program in which that name is valid, that is, in which that name may be used as an unqualified name to refer to the same entity. In general, each particular name is valid only within some possibly discontiguous portion of program text called its scope.

A name declared in a block ([stmt.block]) is local to that block; it has block scope. Its potential scope begins at its point of declaration ([basic.scope.pdecl]) and ends at the end of its block.

Furthermore, along with the scope of the name, the lifetime of the object has also ended so the object that was named by the variable no longer exists outside the block scope.


Shouldn't x exist until I call delete x;?

No. You are confusing the variable x which has automatic storage, and the dynamic object that is pointed by x. The dynamic object still exits, but cannot be accessed because you lost the pointer. Such loss of only pointer to dynamic memory is called a memory leak.

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