5

So Result<T, E> has a pretty neat method map_err that allows to handle errors in a functional way:

use std::io::Result;
use std::error::Error;
use std::string::ToString;
use std::io;

fn init() -> Result<u32> { Ok(42) }

fn do_work(_data: u32) -> Result<()> { Err(io::Error::new(io::ErrorKind::Other, "IO Error!")) }

fn handle_error<E: Error + ToString>(error: E, message: &str) -> E {
    eprintln!("{}: {}", message, error.to_string());
    error
}

fn main() {
    let _ = init()
        .map_err(|e| handle_error(e, "Init error"))
        .and_then(do_work)
        .map_err(|e| handle_error(e, "Work error")); // "Work error: IO error"
}

It would be cool to have the same functional style for handling Option<T>::None:

use std::io::Result;
use std::error::Error;
use std::string::ToString;
use std::io;

fn init_opt() -> Option<u32> { Some(42) }

fn do_work_opt(_data: u32) -> Option<()> { None }

fn handle_none(message: &str) {
    eprintln!("{}", message);
}

fn main() {
    let _ = init_opt()
        .map_none(|| handle_none("Init error"))
        .and_then(do_work_opt)
        .map_none(|| handle_none("Work error")); // "Work error"
}

But I don't see any suitable replacement for this method in documentation of Option

It can be done with a custom trait like that

trait MapNone {
    fn map_none(self, op: impl FnOnce() -> ()) -> Self;
}

impl<T> MapNone for Option<T> {
    fn map_none(self, op: impl FnOnce() -> ()) -> Self {
        if self.is_none() { op(); } 
        self
    }
}

But I'm sure I'm missing something and there is some pretty way of doing the same via standard library.

Full Playground

6
  • 1
    A function that returns the unit type is not very useful in a functional style because it is required to operate by side effect. Option has or_else and unwrap_or_else that operate on None, but in a (IMHO) more useful way. Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 14:10
  • Well I didn't mean exactly functional idioms without side effects, but a "chain" handling of data Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 14:15
  • Using just the stdlib .map_none(|| {….}) can be expressed as or_else(|| {...; None}). I'm not sure if that answers your question, i.e. whether it's pretty enough. Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 16:26
  • It answers in way of letting me know that there is no as convenient way as I already considered. Thanks on that Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 16:44
  • @user4815162342 post an answer please, if you want to be accepted Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 17:08

1 Answer 1

6

The function Option::or_else exists that is a generalized form of what you propose. Rather than requiring it's function to return the unit type, it returns an Option, so simply have it return None to simulate your use case.

fn main() {
    let _ = init_opt()
        .or_else(|| {handle_none("Init error"); None})
        .and_then(do_work_opt)
        .or_else(|| {handle_none("Work error"); None}); // "Work error"
}

One can of course also now return Some(x) instead to branch differently.

Finally, or_else and and_then can also be combined with map_or_else:

fn main() {
    let _ = init_opt()
      .map_or_else(|| {handle_none("Init error"); None}, do_work_opt)
      .or_else(|| {handle_none("Work error"); None}); // "Work error"
}

This code should do the same as the above; map_or_else branches depending on whether the option be None or contain a value.

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