2

I am trying to reduce code duplication while using std::unique_ptr and it's custom deleter.

I have the some containers Foo, Bar which are allocated using one custom allocator, so cannot be freed with delete.

So the current code is:

struct UniqueFooDeleter
{
   void operator()(Foo* foo) 
   {
      internal_free(foo);
   }
};
using unique_foo_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Foo, UniqueFooDeleter>;

struct UniqueBarDeleter 
{
   void operator()(Bar* bar) 
   {
      internal_free(bar);
   }
};
using unique_bar_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Bar, UniqueBarDeleter>;

I changed it to:

struct UniqueInternalDeleter
{
   void operator()(Bar* bar)
   {
      internal_free(bar);
   }

   void operator()(Foo* foo)
   {
      internal_free(foo);
   }
};
using unique_bar_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Bar, UniqueInternalDeleter>;
using unique_foo_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Foo, UniqueInternalDeleter>;

How can I do better such that any number of containers that are allocated via internal_free can be used as std::unique_ptrs ?

  • 2
    Why do you worry about std::unique_ptr<Tri, UniqueInternalDeleter>? You'll get a compile-time error once you try to use a variable of this type. – Evg Aug 1 at 15:18
  • @Evg sadly I rushed over this.. IDE didn't complain, so I didn't compile it. Let me change the post. – anki Aug 1 at 15:23
  • 1
    To simplify UniqueInternalDeleter make operator() a template that accepts any T and either make it the responsibility of a user to provide correct deleter or use static_assert similar to JeJo's answer. – Evg Aug 1 at 15:30
  • 1
    For your thirst edit/ question update, simplest what I can think, you can provide a variable template which chek the types which are allowed and use static_assert in the answer provided: template<typename Container> inline constexpr bool hasInternalFreeAllocator = std::is_same_v<T, Foo> || std::is_same_v<T, Bar> || other container....; – JeJo Aug 1 at 15:39
3

You can make the UniqueInternalDeleter as templated functor and static_assert, if the T is not Foo or bar.

#include <type_traits> // std::is_same_v

template<typename T>
struct UniqueInternalDeleter /* final */
{
   static_assert(std::is_same_v<T, Foo> || std::is_same_v<T, Bar>,
      " T must be either Foo or Bar");

   void operator()(T* barOrfoo)
   {
      internal_free(barOrfoo);
   }

private:
   void internal_free(T* barOrfoo)
   {
      if constexpr(std::is_same_v<T, Foo>)
         // code for `Foo*`
      else
         // code for `Bar*`

   }
};

This makes the your alias to be more specific for Bar and Foo:

using unique_bar_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Bar, UniqueInternalDeleter<Bar>>;
using unique_foo_ptr = std::unique_ptr<Foo, UniqueInternalDeleter<Foo>>;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I suggest you move template inside deleter and make operator() a template. – Evg Aug 1 at 15:29
  • Jejo: I made the question a bit more specific: The problem as of now is that I'd be having a chain of || in the assert in the deleter when there are several containers. CC @Evg – anki Aug 1 at 15:35
  • @JeJo, I guess, no. But not mentioning the type looks like a big advantage. – Evg Aug 1 at 15:43
  • JeJo, internal_free accepts void*, so the code in private is not required for my use case. You may keep it for future readers. – anki Aug 1 at 16:16
2

One possible approach:

template<class> struct needs_internal_free : std::false_type { };

struct unique_internal_deleter {
    template<class T>
    void operator()(T* ptr) const {
        static_assert(needs_internal_free<T>::value);
        internal_free(ptr);
    }
};

template<class T>
using unique_internal_ptr = std::unique_ptr<T, unique_internal_deleter>;

Now we can declare specific types:

template<> struct needs_internal_free<Foo> : std::true_type { };
using unique_foo_ptr = unique_internal_ptr<Foo>;

template<> struct needs_internal_free<Bar> : std::true_type { };
using unique_bar_ptr = unique_internal_ptr<Bar>;
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @JeJo, sure. I just wanted to decouple needs_internal_free (or use_..., not sure if the new name is good) from Foo, Bar, etc., so that new types could be added by adding independent specializations. Otherwise, needs_internal_free looks redundant. – Evg Aug 1 at 15:53

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