2

I have a TextBox and a Button. When the user hits Enter, I want the specific button related to the TextBox to be clicked. TextBox and Button are classes. I am passing Button instance into the TextBox, so that we know one should be clicked. Button is a class with 2 methods click() and autoclick().

What I want is for autoclick() to check if Enter key is being pressed and make click() return True if it is. I tried using decorators and wrote this toy program to demonstrate exactly what I tried.

class Button:
    def click(self):
        return False

    def autoclick(self, func, *args):
        def wrapper():
            func(*args)# This function needes events as it argumnet
            return True
        return wrapper

b = Button()
class TextBox:
    def __init__(self, button=None):
        self.button = button

    def box(self):
        if enterPressed:
            if self.button is not None:
                self.button.autoclick(self.button.click, events)()


tb = TextBox(button=b)
while True:
    tb.box()
    if b.click():
        print("this needs to be printed when user hits enter")

I don't get any errors but it simply doesn't work.

  • 2
    tb.button is always None, so self.button.autoclick(self.button.click, events) will never be executed. – Jack Song Aug 1 at 21:17
  • 1
    this question was already asked so feel free to take a look into 7201715 – Ari24 Aug 1 at 21:19
  • @Jack Song Sorry, b was meant to be passed to TextBox, i updated the question – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 21:20
  • another problem is that the decorator is never actually called. self.button.autoclick(self.button.click, events) just returns the function handler but does not run the function. – Jack Song Aug 1 at 21:23
  • Ah, yes my bad again, i updated the question, sorry – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 21:24
1

I think I may know what you want to do now.

Try this out. This is how we usually use decorators.

class Button:
    @autoclick # this is how decorators are used.
    def click(self):
        return False

    def autoclick(self, func):
        def wrapper(*args):
            func(*args)# This function needes events as it argumnet
            return True
        if enterPressed:
            return wrapper
        else:
            return func
| improve this answer | |
  • No, this didn't work. I think it's because we are only printing something if b.click itself returns True not autoclick – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 21:48
  • Yes. It is always False now. – Jack Song Aug 1 at 21:52
  • It says autoclick missing one required positional argument "func" – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 22:30
1

I think the following part is needed to be modified

class TextBox:
   def __init__(self, button=None):
       self.button = button

   def box(self):
       if enterPressed:
           if self.button is not None:
               self.button.autoclick(self.button.click, events)()

to something like:

class TextBox:
    def __init__(self, button=None):
        self.button = button

    def box(self):
        if enterPressed:
            if self.button is not None:
                self.button.click = self.button.autoclick(self.button.click)  # this line is changed

UPDATE

I guess maybe you are supposed to mean something like the following:

class Button:
    def _click(self):  # Maybe this method have events as parameters?
        return False

    def click(self):
        return self._click()

    def autoclick(self):
        def wrapper(*args):
            self._click(*args)  # This function needs events as it arguments
            self.click = self._click
            return True

        self.click = wrapper


class TextBox:
    def __init__(self, button=None):
        self.button = button

    def box(self):
        if enterPressed:
            if self.button is not None:
                self.button.autoclick()

Or maybe this one? :

class Button:
    def _click(self):  # Maybe this method have events as parameters?
        return False

    def click(self):
        return self._click()

    def autoclick(self):
        def wrapper(*args):
            result = self._click(*args)  # This function needs events as it arguments
            if enterPressed:
                return True
            return result

        self.click = wrapper


class TextBox:
    def __init__(self, button=None):
        self.button = button

    def box(self):
        if self.button is not None:
            self.button.autoclick()
| improve this answer | |
  • This worked in a sense. It sets button.click to True. But now i want it to go back to being a button object so it continues to serve as a button and not a boolean – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 22:05
  • 1
    @hippozhipos It sets button.click to a function returns True, not just boolean True. So you mean you want to turn back button.click to the state before wrapped by the decorator so that it becomes again a function returns False? – Gorisanson Aug 1 at 22:11
  • Yes that's what i meant. – hippozhipos Aug 1 at 22:13
  • @hippozhipos I updated my answer. I hope my guess would be right :) – Gorisanson Aug 1 at 22:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.