7

I'm learning some Fluent NHibernate and I've run across the semi-awesome PersistenceSpecification class.

I've set it up in a unit test to verify my mappings and it works great. However, it leaves the record in the database when done. I tried throwing it in a transaction so I can rollback the changes but I get an error:

System.ObjectDisposedException: Cannot access a disposed object. Object name: 'AdoTransaction'..

Without a transaction I have to figure out the ID's of the record, retrieve them and delete them and that doesn't seem very elegant.

Any thoughts?

EDIT:

Here is the code snippet:

            var factory = GetSessionFactory();
            using (var session = factory.OpenSession())
            using (var transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
            {
                new PersistenceSpecification<TimePeriod>(session)
                        .CheckProperty(x => x.EndDate, DateTime.Today)
                        .VerifyTheMappings();
                transaction.Rollback();
            }
1
  • I've also found that wrapping the VerifyTheMappings call with a System.EnterpriseServices.ServiceDomain.Enter() and SetAbort()/Leave() works too. Commented Sep 20, 2010 at 18:53

5 Answers 5

9

Try setting the IsolationLevel on the transaction. This snippet worked for me:

using (var trans = _session.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted))
{
    new PersistenceSpecification<Event>(_session)
        .CheckProperty(p => p.StartTime, new DateTime(2010, 1, 1))
        .VerifyTheMappings();
    trans.Rollback();
}
1
  • Gets my Vote, exactly what I was looking for!
    – cgreeno
    Commented Sep 14, 2010 at 13:00
2

The PersistenceSpecification is usually used with an in-memory database like SQLite, that's why it doesn't roll anything back. I believe there's a constructor overload that takes an ISession instance, have you tried getting a transaction from there then rolling that back after?

1
  • Yup, I created my own ISession object from a SessionFactory.OpenSession() call. From there I began a transaction and then after the VerifyTheMappings() call I tried to rollback the transaction and got an error. I'll post the full code snippet below. Commented Mar 11, 2009 at 13:36
2

I think the issue here is VerifyTheMappings() calls TransactionSave() which does a tx.Commit() to the database. As James indicated, this technique seems to work great for throw away in-memory testing techniques. This would not work in the case of testing mappings against a legacy database.

1

Setting IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted will work, but only incidentally, since all it is doing is telling the session that it can read without needing a new transaction (a dirty read, in DBMS parlance) - so Session.Transaction.Commit () doesn't have to commit a database transaction before the verification reads. This also means that it is not necessarily testing what you think it is testing! (I also think this has probably-questionable support amongst non-MS SQL databases). The answer from leebrandt works because of the explicit rollback, not the isolation level (nb. At the time of the answer this helped more than it does now, see note below).

The good news is that the correct way to do this is to just rollback the transaction manually. Session.Transaction is automatically replaced whenever the transaction is committed, so you'll need to hold a reference to it, and you'll have to open one explicitly anyways, since TransactionalSave () checks if the current transaction is active and creates (and disposes!) its own if not. I typically test all of my mappings in the same fixture, where I also verify the factory creation and a few other infrastructural persistence things, so I like the following pattern for this to keep the plumbing down:

class TestFixture {
    static ISessionFactory factory = CreateMyFactorySomehowHere();

    ISession session;
    ITransaction tx;

    public void Setup ()
    {
        session = factory.OpenSession ();
        tx = session.BeginTransaction ();
    }

    public void Cleanup ()
    {
        tx.Rollback ();
        tx.Dispose ();
        session.Close ();
    }

    public void TestAMappingForSomething ()
    {
        var spec = new PersistenceSpecification<Something> (session);
        spec.VerifyTheMappings ();
    }
}

Obviously, insert your own test-framework-specific terminology and attributes/annotations wherever, but you get the idea.


I've just now noticed how old this question is: this behavior was fixed in this commit in July 09, to handle existing transactions nicely so that the above works! Clearly this is what you were doing originally anyways.

0

i think that it's very important to do this testing with your real db, to see that his tables definition r ok, so i'v developed a very simple class that perform a crud test on a mapped entity and roll back at the end;

 internal class GenericMappingTesterWithRealDB<T> where T : IIdentifiable
{
    public T EntityToTest { get; set; }
    public Func<T, object> PerformEntityManipulationBeforeUpdate { get; set; }
    public GenericMappingTesterWithRealDB()
    {
        Assume.That(SessionFactoryProvider.NewSession,Is.Not.Null);
    }

    public void RunTest()
    {
        using (ISession session = SessionFactoryProvider.NewSession)
        using (ITransaction transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            try
            {
                session.Save(EntityToTest);
                var item = session.Get<T>(EntityToTest.ID);
                Assert.IsNotNull(item);
                if (PerformEntityManipulationBeforeUpdate != null)
                {
                    PerformEntityManipulationBeforeUpdate.Invoke(EntityToTest);
                }
                session.Update(EntityToTest);
                session.Delete(EntityToTest);
                session.Save(EntityToTest);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Assert.Fail(e.Message, e.StackTrace);
            }
            finally
            {
                transaction.Rollback();
            }
        }
    }
}

IIdentifiable in my project is the most basic interface of my entities

the class is using the nunit.framework but u can do it with every testing framework u want

sessionfactoryprovider needs to supply the isession obj

here is a sample of use

/// <summary>
/// Testing the mapping of our entities.
/// there must be a server connection for this kind of test.
/// </summary>
[TestFixture]
internal class someMappingTest
{
    [Test(Description = "Check the Encoding Profile FluentNHibernate Mapping")]
    [Timeout(20000)]
    public void checkthatMappingWorks()
    {
        // creatw the new entity
        TestedType testOn = new TestedType();

        // set the initialization values
        testOn.Name = "TestProfileExecution";

        // create the test object
        new GenericMappingTesterWithRealDB<TestedType>
        {
            // assign an entity
            EntityToTest = testOn,

            // assign new values for update check
            PerformEntityManipulationBeforeUpdate =
                delegate(TestedType testedTypeBeingTested)
                    {
                        return testedTypeBeingTested.Name = "Updateing Test";
                    }
        }.
        // call run test to perform the mapping test.
        RunTest();

    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.