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I am writing a compiler and have written a c++ class in it consisting of several functions. While compiling, it is producing two errors saying [Error] expected primary-expression before 'name' and [Error] expected ')' before 'name' in the same line of the function definition string typeof(string name). And also just above two lines of this function's definition(wherever it is), at the end of another function, it is producing another error saying [Error] expected unqualified-id at end of input. There are some more similar functions' definitions (takes same arguments and returns same data type) which are not producing any such error but only this one. I tried hard to figure out what is wrong but failed. Could you please verify the code of the class below and provide any suggestions on what is wrong? Thank you in advance.

struct element{
string name, type, kind;
int index; 
element *nxt;
};

class symbolTable{
private :
    element *clas, *sr, *temp;
    int st_varcount, fi_varcount, arg_varcount, loc_varcount;
public :
    symbolTable(){
        clas=NULL;
        sr=NULL;
        temp=NULL;
        st_varcount=-1;
        fi_varcount=-1;
        arg_varcount=-1;
        loc_varcount=-1;
    }
    
    void startSubroutine(){
        sr=NULL;
        arg_varcount=-1;
        loc_varcount=-1;
    }
    
    void insert(element *e, element *head){
        if(head==NULL){
            head=e;
        }
        else{
            temp=head;
            while(temp->nxt!=NULL){
                temp=temp->nxt;
            }
            temp->nxt=e;
        }
    }
    
    void define(string name, string type, string kind){
        element *e;
        e=new element;
        e->name=name;
        e->type=type;
        e->nxt=NULL;
        if(kind.compare("field")==0){
            e->kind="this";
        }
        else if(kind.compare("var")==0){
            e->kind="local";
        }
        else if(kind.compare("arg")==0){
            e->kind="argument";
        }
        else{
            e->kind=kind;
        }
        if(e->kind.compare("static")==0){
            st_varcount++;
            e->index=st_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("this")==0){
            fi_varcount++;
            e->index=fi_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("argument")==0){
            arg_varcount++;
            e->index=arg_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("local")==0){
            loc_varcount++;
            e->index=loc_varcount;
        }
        if(e->kind.compare("static")==0 || e->kind.compare("this")==0){
            insert(e, clas);
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("argument")==0 || e->kind.compare("local")==0){
            insert(e, sr);
        }
    }
    
    element* search(string name){
        temp=sr;
        while(temp!=NULL){
            if(temp->name.compare(name)==0){
                return temp;
            }
        }
        if(temp==NULL){
            temp=clas;
            while(temp!=NULL){
                if(temp->name.compare(name)==0){
                    return temp;
                }
            }
            if(temp==NULL){
                return NULL;
            }
        }
    }
    
    string typeof(string name){
        element *l;
        l=search(name);
        if(l==NULL){
            return "NONE";
        }
        else{
            return l->type;
        }
    }
    
    string kindof(string name){
        element *l;
        l=search(name);
        if(l==NULL){
            return "NONE";
        }
        else{
            return l->kind;
        }
    }
    
    int indexof(string name){
        element *l;
        if(l==NULL){
            return INT_MAX;
        }
        else{
            return l->index;
        }
    }
    
};
  • 2
    You forgot to #include<string> and it must be std::string. – churill Aug 3 at 14:36
  • Are you writing a compiler by yourself ? – Lucas Charbonnier Aug 3 at 14:37
  • @churill I have always included #include<string>. And I have used strings all along my program. But the error prevails only here. Can't find out what it is. – Sai Krishna Garlapati Aug 3 at 14:43
  • @LucasCharbonnier Yes. For a language called Jack as part of a project in a course. – Sai Krishna Garlapati Aug 3 at 14:44
  • @SaiKrishnaGarlapati Well, we can only see what you post here. If the file indeed has the proper includes and namespace directives you need to post them. That's the reproducible part of a minimal reproducible example. In this case it reproduces the wrong error. – churill Aug 3 at 14:48
2

I think you're being bit by a gcc compiler language extension. Try using a name other than typeof, such as type_of or typeOf.

You can also use the -fno-gnu-keywords compiler option:

-fno-gnu-keywords
    Do not recognize typeof as a keyword, so that code can use this word as
    an identifier. You can use the keyword __typeof__ instead. This option is
    implied by the strict ISO C++ dialects: -ansi, -std=c++98, -std=c++11, etc.
| improve this answer | |
  • Oh yeah! That is it. I can't thank you enough for helping me. – Sai Krishna Garlapati Aug 3 at 14:47
0

Made your C++ class more a bit more C++. Your code didn't compile because of "typeof" - changed it to typeOf. Also changed class names to start with capital letters. Use any modern IDE with dynamic code completion and check - it will show you many mistakes.

#include <string>

struct Element{
    std::string name;
    std::string type;
    std::string kind;
    int index;
    Element *nxt;
};

class SymbolTable{
private :
    Element *clas{nullptr};
    Element *sr{nullptr};
    Element *temp{nullptr};

    int st_varcount{};
    int fi_varcount{};
    int arg_varcount{};
    int loc_varcount{};
public :
    SymbolTable() :
        clas{nullptr},
        sr{nullptr},
        temp{nullptr},
        st_varcount{-1},
        fi_varcount{-1},
        arg_varcount{-1},
        loc_varcount{-1} { }

    void startSubroutine(){
        sr=nullptr;
        arg_varcount=-1;
        loc_varcount=-1;
    }

    void insert(Element *e, Element *head){
        if(head==nullptr){
            head=e;
        }
        else
        {
            temp=head;
            while(temp->nxt!=nullptr)
            {
                temp=temp->nxt;
            }
            temp->nxt=e;
        }
    }

    void define(std::string name, std::string type, std::string kind){
        Element *e;
        e=new Element;
        e->name=name;
        e->type=type;
        e->nxt=nullptr;
        if(kind.compare("field")==0) {
            e->kind="this";
        }
        else if(kind.compare("var")==0) {
            e->kind="local";
        }
        else if(kind.compare("arg")==0) {
            e->kind="argument";
        }
        else{
            e->kind=kind;
        }
        if(e->kind.compare("static")==0) {
            st_varcount++;
            e->index=st_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("this")==0) {
            fi_varcount++;
            e->index=fi_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("argument")==0) {
            arg_varcount++;
            e->index=arg_varcount;
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("local")==0) {
            loc_varcount++;
            e->index=loc_varcount;
        }
        if(e->kind.compare("static")==0 || e->kind.compare("this")==0) {
            insert(e, clas);
        }
        else if(e->kind.compare("argument")==0 || e->kind.compare("local")==0) {
            insert(e, sr);
        }
    }

    Element* search(std::string const &name){
        temp=sr;
        while(temp!=nullptr){
            if(temp->name.compare(name)==0){
                return temp;
            }
        }
        if(temp==nullptr){
            temp=clas;
            while(temp!=nullptr){
                if(temp->name.compare(name)==0) {
                    return temp;
                }
            }
            if(temp==nullptr){
                return nullptr;
            }
        }

        // return missing
        return nullptr;
    }

    std::string typeOf(std::string const &name) {
        auto l = search(name);
        if (l==nullptr) {
            return "NONE";
        }
        else
        {
            return l->type;
        }
    }

    std::string kindof(std::string const &name) {
        auto *l = search(name);
        if (l==nullptr) {
            return "NONE";
        }
        else{
            return l->kind;
        }
    }

    int indexof(std::string const &name) {
        Element *l{nullptr}; // a logic error here!!!
        if(l==nullptr){
            return std::numeric_limits<int>::max();
        }
        else{
            return l->index;
        }
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your valuable edits to the code. Got the answer. – Sai Krishna Garlapati Aug 3 at 14:51
  • Also changed class names to start with capital letters. how is that relevant to the question, whether one would use capital letters at the beginning or not is mostly opinion-based, or defined by the projects style guide. If this is related to Made your C++ class a bit more C++, and you consider the std library defined by the c++ standard as the most c++ like library, then the uppercase letters are not the "correct" coding style. – t.niese Aug 4 at 10:20
  • If you already suggest to use default member initialization, why do you still initialize them again in the default constructor? And if you already start to suggest to make it more c++ like, you should mention more important flaws memory leaks, and the rules of zero/three/five which are really a problem in the original code. – t.niese Aug 4 at 10:28
  • @t.niese, thank you for your feedback, it is valuable for me. I got your point. In this certain case I just wanted to show an example how to make the code more readable (using one of the coding styles), use things like nullpr, numeric_limits, autos, default initialization, etc. Yes, it is opinion based. The goal was to draw the OP's attention to these basic things. Elaborating on other things seemed to go way beyond the original question. Anyway, point taken, thank you. – Vasilij Aug 4 at 10:52

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