29

I have a task I found on CodeWars and I managed to solve it, however, after submitting is says:

Execution timed out: (12000 ms)

When I try to test the function is passed, but I guess it is too slow. Before you condemn me for not finding the answer on my own. I don't really care about submitting that as a response, but I have no idea how to make it faster and that is why I am here. Here is the function:

const ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]

const partsSums = (ls) => {
    const sum = []
    for(let i = 0, len = ls.length; i < len + 1; i++) {
        let result = ls.slice(i).reduce( (accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator + currentValue, 0)
        sum.push(result)
    }
    return sum
}

Here are the instructions:

Let us consider this example (array written in general format):

ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]

Its following parts:

ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]
ls = [1, 3, 6, 10]
ls = [3, 6, 10]
ls = [6, 10]
ls = [10]
ls = []

The corresponding sums are (put together in a list): [20, 20, 19, 16, 10, 0]

The function parts_sums (or its variants in other languages) will take as parameter a list ls and return a list of the sums of its parts as defined above.

  • 4
    actually you need to go here codereview.stackexchange.com – Ifaruki Aug 4 at 7:11
  • 2
    @Ifaruki I disagree. The CR is for code that works but can be made better. This one doesn't work. It fails in the execution time, which means it doesn't fulfil the requirements. It has problem that needs to be fixed which is what SO is about. – VLAZ Aug 4 at 7:14
  • 9
    @VLAZ: That's ridiculous. The code works, if the OP is to be believed. It just needs to be improved, not fixed. That is what code review is about. – TonyK Aug 4 at 20:48
  • 1
    Can you put the link to the Codewars kata? – haxor Aug 4 at 21:51
  • 3
    @VLAZ Code Review even has a time-limit-exceeded tag. – Solomon Ucko Aug 5 at 1:30
18

For this kind of array maipulations, you better not use build in methods, like slice or reduce, because they are slow in comparison to a for loop, or any other looping approaches.

This approach takes a sinlge loop and uses the index for getting a value of the given array and takes the last sum of the new array.

Some speed tests on Codewars: Sums of Parts:

  • 5621 ms with sparse array sum = []; sum[i] = 0; (the first version of this answer),
  • 3452 ms with Array(i + 1).fill(0) and without sum[i] = 0;,
  • 1261 ms with Array(i + 1) and sum[i] = 0; (find below),
  • 3733 ms with Icepickle's first attempt.

const
    partsSums = (ls) => {
        let i = ls.length;
        const sum = Array(i + 1);

        sum[i] = 0;
        while (i--) sum[i] = sum[i + 1] + ls[i];

        return sum;
    },
    ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10];

console.log(...partsSums(ls));

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    slice and reduce are not slow in comparison to looping explicitly, the problem with the OP's code is the O(n²) algorithm. – Bergi Aug 4 at 18:50
  • Any idea why mine seems to be faster? Is it the array index access, it doesn't really seem to make much sense... On a second look, if I prefill the sum array beforehand, the execution time is a lot faster as well – Icepickle Aug 4 at 22:51
  • 2
    @Icepickle Yes, Nina's answer fills the array from the end, creating a sparse array that's probably not well optimised. Growing it from the front is generally faster. – Bergi Aug 4 at 23:34
  • now with an array of the wanted length. this should work faster now. – Nina Scholz Aug 5 at 5:59
  • When I run Cortoloman's function from the original question it takes 1129 ms - which is faster than this answer! – James Aug 24 at 12:16
11

You can still take a more functional approach but optimise the way you're doing the calculations.

Here is the idea - since you're trying to sum all items, then sum all but the first, then sum all but the second, etc., mathematically equivalent to getting the sum then subtracting from it each number in order and keeping the total.

[sum([41, 42, 43]), sum([42, 43]), sum([43]), sum([])]

is the same as:

total = sum([41, 42, 43])
[total - 0, total - 0 - 41, total - 0 - 41 - 42, total - 0 - 41 - 42- 43]

is the same as:

total = sum([41, 42, 43])
[total -= 0, total -= 41, total -= 42, total -= 43]

Generalised, this looks like:

total = sum([a1, a2, ..., aN])
[total -= 0, total -= a1, total -= a2, ..., total -= aN]

Using the trusty Array#reduce we can derive the sum once. Then we can derive the new array using Array.map using ls.map(num => total -= num).

The only problem here is that we get one less item - we don't calculate the initial total -= 0 which has to exist for all items. One way to do it is to append it to the start [0].concat(ls) will create the correct array to map over. However, since we already know what the value there would be, we can skip this step and directly substitute with total (after all the result of total -= 0 is total and leaves total unchanged). So, we can directly use [total].concat(ls.map(num => total -= num)) to start with total and add the rest of the items. to the end.

const ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10]

const partsSums = (ls) => {
    let total = ls.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0);
    
    return [total]
      .concat(
        ls.map(num => total -= num)
      );
}

console.log(partsSums(ls));

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I misread that as num => total - num. If you have to use a side effect (not a very functional approach) in map, better make it explicit: num => { total -= num; return total; } – Bergi Aug 4 at 18:53
4

Personally, I would just use the previous sum to calculate the next, I don't see any need to re-iterate all the previous sums, so, I would probably go for a basic loop and then reverse the results, like so

function partsSums(ls) {
  const result = [0];
  if (ls.length === 0) {
    return result;
  }
  for (let i = ls.length, q = 0; i--; q++) {
    result.push(result[q] + ls[i]);
  }
  return result.reverse();
}

or, without reversing, look more like Nina's solution (except for predefining the length of the array)

function partsSums(ls) {
  const len = ls.length;
  const result = new Array(len+1);
  result[len] = 0;
  for (let i = len; i--;) {
    result[i] = result[i+1] + ls[i];
  }  
  return result;
}

Both also seem to run faster than Nina's on codewars nodejs engine, in the first part probably because of push, in the second one, probably because the array's length is defined from the start, for more information see this question

| improve this answer | |
1

A solution using normal for loop along the time of execution .

var arr = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10];


function giveList(array){
    
    var sum=0;
    for(let i=0;i<array.length;i++){
       sum=sum+array[i];
    }

    var result = [];
    result.push(sum);
    var temp;
    for(let i=0;i<array.length;i++){
       temp=sum-array[i];
       result.push(temp); 
       sum=sum-array[i];
        
     }
 return result;
}

console.time();
console.log(giveList(arr));
console.timeEnd();

| improve this answer | |
1
const partsSums = (ls, sum = 0) =>
   [...ls, 0].reverse().map(x => sum = x + sum).reverse();

Takes around 1100 ms when I run it on CodeWars, which is slightly faster than other answers.

| improve this answer | |
0

The repeated operation is too more. e.g: when you compute sum of [3, 6, 10], the up step [1, 3, 6, 10] already compute。 So you can think in another direction, back to end compute the sum of array

const ls = [0, 1, 3, 6, 10];

function partSums(ls) {
   const len = ls.length;
   const dp = [];

   if(len === 0) { return [0] }
   dp[len] = 0;
   dp[len - 1] = ls[len - 1];
   for (let i = len - 2; i >= 0; i--) {
     dp[i] = dp[i + 1] + ls[i];
   }

   return dp;
}
| improve this answer | |

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