76

I want to be able to hide the header at the top of each grid column in a WPF ListView.

This is the XAML for my ListView:

   <Window x:Class="ListViewTest.Test0.ListViewTest"
   xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
   xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
   Title="Empty ListView Grid" Height="216" Width="435" FlowDirection="LeftToRight" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" Grid.IsSharedSizeScope="False">
    <Window.Resources>
        <XmlDataProvider x:Key="CustomersDS" Source="C:\data.xml"/>
    </Window.Resources>


    <ListView Margin="0,0,0,50" ItemTemplate="{DynamicResource CustomerTemplate}" ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource CustomersDS}, XPath=/Customers/Customer}">
        <ListView.View>
            <GridView>
                <GridViewColumn  DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding XPath=Code}"/>
                <GridViewColumn  DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding XPath=Name}"/>
                <GridViewColumn  DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding XPath=Country}"/>
            </GridView>
        </ListView.View>
    </ListView>


</Window>

The data I am binding this to is:

 <Customers>
  <Customer>
 <Code>1234</Code>
 <Name>EPI</Name>
 <Country>Sesame Street</Country>
  </Customer>
  <Customer>
 <Code>3234</Code>
 <Name>Paul</Name>
 <Country>United Kingdom</Country>
  </Customer>
 <Customer>
 <Code>3344</Code>
 <Name>Juan</Name>
 <Country>Spain</Country>
  </Customer>
 <Customer>
 <Code>4321</Code>
 <Name>Dodo</Name>
 <Country>Mars</Country>
  </Customer>
</Customers>
131

Define a Style like so

<Window.Resources>
    ....
    <Style x:Key="myHeaderStyle" TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}">
        <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
    </Style>
</Window.Resources>

Apply it like so

<GridView ColumnHeaderContainerStyle="{StaticResource myHeaderStyle}">
    ....
</GridView>
  • 2
    Shouldn't this be FrameworkElement.Visibility, at least in WPF 3.5? (I know this is an old topic, but it's at the top on Google, so it's useful for a lot of people) – Roy T. Aug 11 '11 at 11:00
  • 1
    It doesn't need to be. You've specified the target type, so you don't need to specify where the property is. – Ray Aug 11 '11 at 11:05
  • Excellent post...saved me a heap of time and worked a treat .. thanks – Kev Dec 19 '12 at 20:54
  • If reuse isn't a factor, this can be done inline on the GridView too: <GridView><GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle><Style TargetType="{x:Type GridViewColumnHeader}"><Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" /></Style></GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle></GridView> – HotN Jan 4 at 23:40
47

Thanks for this solution. You can also put the Style inline like so:

<ListView>
    <ListView.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="GridViewColumnHeader">
            <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
        </Style>
    </ListView.Resources>
    <ListView.View>
        <GridView>
            <!-- ... -->
        </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
</ListView>

(Also, the {x:Type} notation you used doesn't seem to be needed)

  • Although both answers are correct, this is the most preferred. thank you. – New Bee Feb 23 '14 at 23:18
15

Another way you can apply Ray's solution is like this:

<ListView>
    <ListView.View>
        <GridView>
            <GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>
                <Style TargetType="GridViewColumnHeader">
                    <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed" />
                </Style>
            </GridView.ColumnHeaderContainerStyle>
        </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
</ListView>

The solution sets the style property directly rather than creating a resource that is automatically applied. Not saying it's better, just another way...

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