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I built a small type-level library to simplify writing pairs of functions of the form

function a(...): T | undefined;
function b(...): T;

where b is derived from a by throwing an exception if undefined is returned. The basic idea is as follows:

export enum FailMode { CanFail, CanNotFail }
export const canFail = FailMode.CanFail;
export const canNotFail = FailMode.CanNotFail

export type Failure<F extends FailMode> = F extends FailMode.CanFail ? undefined : never;
export type Maybe<T, F extends FailMode> = T | Failure<F>;

export function failure<F extends FailMode>(mode: F): Failure<F> {
  if (mode === canFail) return undefined as Failure<F>;
  throw new Error("failure");
}

Now we can combine a and b into a single function that takes one extra parameter to distinguish the types:

function upperCaseIfYouCan<F extends FailMode>(x: string | undefined, mode: F): Maybe<string, F> {
  if (x === undefined)
    return failure<F>(mode);
  return x.toUpperCase();
}

// both of these now work
let y: string = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canNotFail);          // can throw, but will never return undefined
let z: string | undefined = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canFail); // cannot throw, but can return undefined

Now in most cases I want the canNotFail variant, and I'm wondering if there is a way to make this the "default" in that I don't have to pass the canNotFail parameter in that case, so that the following would work:

let y: string = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo");  // can throw

I already determined that this cannot be achieved via default arguments, because the type of the default argument must be unifiable with F. Is there a way to achieve this in a different way, such that defining functions like upperCaseIfYouCan is similarly easy?

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1 Answer 1

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The compiler isn't happy about you specifying a default parameter because someone can always come along and manually specify the generic type parameter when calling, like this: upperCaseIfYouCan<FailMode.CanFail>("");. If you don't expect that to happen you can use a type assertion to suppress that error, and additionally, you should give the F type parameter its own default so that without an obvious choice for F the compiler will choose your default instead of the complete FailMode:

function upperCaseIfYouCan<F extends FailMode = FailMode.CanNotFail>(
    x: string | undefined,
    mode: F = canNotFail as F
): Maybe<string, F> {
    if (x === undefined)
        return failure<F>(mode);
    return x.toUpperCase();
}

This should work with your use cases:

let str = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canNotFail); // string
let strOrUndef = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canFail); // string | undefined

// this is the behavior you want
str = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo"); // string

On the other hand, you could just use overloads to handle the two different ways of calling your function. While generics are more elegant conceptually, overloads might be more intuitive in this situation:

function upperCaseIfYouCan(x: string | undefined, mode: FailMode.CanFail): string | undefined;
function upperCaseIfYouCan(x: string | undefined, mode?: FailMode.CanNotFail): string;
function upperCaseIfYouCan(
    x: string | undefined,
    mode: FailMode = FailMode.CanNotFail
) {
    if (x === undefined) return failure(mode);
    return x.toUpperCase();
}

let str = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canNotFail); // string
let strOrUndef = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo", canFail); // string | undefined

str = upperCaseIfYouCan("foo"); // string

It's not any safer inside the implementation than the version with the type assertion, but at least the overload can't easily be called the wrong way (there's no F to manually specify).


Okay, hope one of those gives you some direction. Good luck!

Playground link to code

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