I Found some codes for quit an Android application programatically. By calling any one of the following code in onDestroy() will it quit application entirely?

  1. System.runFinalizersOnExit(true)
    (OR)
  2. android.os.Process.killProcess(android.os.Process.myPid());

I dont want to run my application in background after clicking quit button. Pls suggest me can i use any one of these code to quit my app? If so which code can i use? Is it good way to quit the app in Android?

27 Answers 27

Since API 16 you can use the finishAffinity method, which seems to be pretty close to closing all related activities by its name and Javadoc description:

this.finishAffinity();

Finish this activity as well as all activities immediately below it in the current task that have the same affinity. This is typically used when an application can be launched on to another task (such as from an ACTION_VIEW of a content type it understands) and the user has used the up navigation to switch out of the current task and into its own task. In this case, if the user has navigated down into any other activities of the second application, all of those should be removed from the original task as part of the task switch.

Note that this finish does not allow you to deliver results to the previous activity, and an exception will be thrown if you are trying to do so.


Since API 21 you can use a very similar command

finishAndRemoveTask();

Finishes all activities in this task and removes it from the recent tasks list.

  • 17
    Definitely this is the right answer! It's not a good solution to finish an app using System.exit(0);. Thank you for your answer! Finally I've found a decent solution. – Antonio May 29 '15 at 22:48
  • 3
    Do you know if there is another solution on API 14? Thanks – Script Kitty Nov 29 '15 at 23:15
  • 2
    You can finish() each activity individualy, either when you close the app or inside the activity lifcycle. – sivi Nov 30 '15 at 6:09
  • 2
    WARNING! this.finishAffinity() closes app removing it from memory, so you wont receive push messages and so. – Tincho825 Feb 19 at 17:02
  • 2
    This solution works 99% of cases. However, it will not destroy the process, so for example Dagger will not be cleared. In those rare cases, where killing the process is required, System.exit(0) is the only solution that worked for me. – Slav Jun 27 at 13:53
getActivity().finish();
System.exit(0);

this is the best way to exit your app.!!!

The best solution for me.

  • The best solution for me. Thanks Disonash. – EliaszKubala Sep 5 '14 at 17:32
  • yeah, works great! Have to call this from MainActivity to get it to work! – mz87 Oct 5 '14 at 21:59
  • Perfect solution. No need to terminate the process, as Android knows best for memory management. However, this provides a solution for finishing the activity, as well as exiting the app for user convenience. – IAmTheSquidward Jan 8 '15 at 5:25
  • 18
    I don't think this is a good solution. You oughtn't finish your program using System.exit(0);. The right solution was posted by @sivi (his answer is above) – Antonio May 29 '15 at 22:53
  • 8
    this is not the solution, it doesn't work if you have a stack of activities – user3290180 Aug 12 '15 at 17:28

Please think really hard about if you do need to kill the application: why not let the OS figure out where and when to free the resources?

Otherwise, if you're absolutely really sure, use

finish();

As a reaction to @dave appleton's comment: First thing read the big question/answer combo @gabriel posted: Is quitting an application frowned upon?

Now assuming we have that, the question here still has an answer, being that the code you need if you are doing anything with quitting is finish(). Obviously you can have more than one activity etc etc, but that's not the point. Lets run by some of the use-cases

  1. You want to let the user quit everything because of memory usage and "not running in the background? Doubtfull. Let the user stop certain activities in the background, but let the OS kill any unneeded recourses.
  2. You want a user to not go to the previous activity of your app? Well, either configure it so it doesn't, or you need an extra option. If most of the time the back=previous-activity works, wouldn't the user just press home if he/she wants to do something else?
  3. If you need some sort of reset, you can find out if/how/etc your application was quit, and if your activity gets focus again you can take action on that, showing a fresh screen instead of restarting where you were.

So in the end, ofcourse, finish() doesn't kill everthing, but it is still the tool you need I think. If there is a usecase for "kill all activities", I haven't found it yet.

  • 20
    Calling finish() will not kill the application. finish() is used all the time: Call this when your activity is done and should be closed. It's the same effect as hitting the "back" button. – Tanner Perrien Jun 13 '11 at 12:44
  • Finish will kill the activity. how is this different then killing the appliation? – Nanne Jun 13 '11 at 13:26
  • There is nothing wrong with "finishing" or "killing" the Activity (not the Application). For example, you might start a new activity to show the user some information. After a timeout or pressing 'OK' you might call finish() to return to the calling activity. – Tanner Perrien Jun 13 '11 at 13:55
  • 33
    Most Android applications have more than one activity. – CommonsWare Jun 13 '11 at 14:03
  • 3
    @Nanne - A lock screen is an example of when you'd want to stop all activities. Suppose you log into a banking app. After a certain period of time with no interaction from the user, the lock screen launches. You'll want to stop all activities if someone hits the back button from the lock screen! – Jabari May 30 '13 at 5:13

finishAffinity();

System.exit(0);

If you will use only finishAffinity(); without System.exit(0); your application will quit but the allocated memory will still be in use by your phone, so... if you want a clean and really quit of an app, use both of them.

This is the simplest method and works anywhere, quit the app for real, you can have a lot of activity opened will still quitting all with no problem.

example on a button click

public void exitAppCLICK (View view) {

    finishAffinity();
    System.exit(0);

}

or if you want something nice, example with an alert dialog with 3 buttons YES NO and CANCEL

// alertdialog for exit the app
AlertDialog.Builder alertDialogBuilder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

// set the title of the Alert Dialog
alertDialogBuilder.setTitle("your title");

// set dialog message
alertDialogBuilder
        .setMessage("your message")
        .setCancelable(false)
        .setPositiveButton("YES"),
                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog,
                                        int id) {
                        // what to do if YES is tapped
                        finishAffinity();
                        System.exit(0);
                    }
                })

        .setNeutralButton("CANCEL"),
                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog,
                                        int id) {
                        // code to do on CANCEL tapped
                        dialog.cancel();
                    }
                })

        .setNegativeButton("NO"),
                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog,
                                        int id) {
                        // code to do on NO tapped
                        dialog.cancel();
                    }
                });

AlertDialog alertDialog = alertDialogBuilder.create();

alertDialog.show();
  • 2
    this is the correct answer, i was looking for. thanks – driftwood Jan 18 at 2:56

There is no application quitting in android, SampleActivity.this.finish(); will finish the current activity.

When you switch from one activity to another keep finish the previous one

Intent homeintent = new Intent(SampleActivity.this,SecondActivity.class);
startActivity(homeintent);
SampleActivity.this.finish();

I think that application should be kill in some case. For example, there is an app can be used only after login. The login activity has two buttons, 'login' and 'cancel'. When you click 'cancel' button, it definitely means 'Terminate the app'. Nobody wants the app alive in the background. So I agree that some cases need to shut down the app.

  • 1
    I total agree with this use-case. Also consider my secure app that must to be available in a certain location and should do it's best to close if the user is not at that location. What do I do? – Sydwell Jun 4 '14 at 10:43
  • Please add a code sample – 030 Mar 17 '15 at 13:29

It depends on how fast you want to close your app.

A safe way to close your app is finishAffinity();

It closes you app after all processes finished processing. This may need some time. If you close your app this way, and restart it after a short time, it is possible that your new application runs in the same process. With all the not finished processes and singleton objects of the old application.

If you want to be sure, that your app is closed completly use System.exit(0);

This will close your app immediatly. But it is possible, that you damage files that your app has open or an edit on shared preferences does not finish. So use this carefully.

If you use watchdog in combination with a long running task, you can see the influences of the different methods.

new ANRWatchDog(2000).setANRListener(new ANRWatchDog.ANRListener() {
    public void onAppNotResponding(ANRError error) {
        MainActivity.this.finishAffinity();
        System.exit(0);
    }
}).start();
for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
    --i;
}

This kills your app after 2 seconds without displaying an ANR dialog or something like that. If you remove System.exit(0), run this code and restart the app after it is closed, you will experience some strange behaviour, because the endless loop is still running.

You had better use finish() if you are in Activity, or getActivity().finish() if you are in the Fragment.

If you want to quit the app completely, then use:

getActivity().finish();
System.exit(0);

Create a ExitActivity and declare it in manifest. And call ExitActivity.exit(context) for exiting app.

public class ExitActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        finish();
    }

    public static void exit(Context context) {
        Intent intent = new Intent(context, ExitActivity.class);
        intent.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);
        intent.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
        intent.addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TASK);
        context.startActivity(intent);
    }

}

I'm not sure if this is frowned upon or not, but this is how I do it...

Step 1 - I usually have a class that contains methods and variables that I want to access globally. In this example I'll call it the "App" class. Create a static Activity variable inside the class for each activity that your app has. Then create a static method called "close" that will run the finish() method on each of those Activity variables if they are NOT null. If you have a main/parent activity, close it last:

public class App
{
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    // INSTANTIATED ACTIVITY VARIABLES
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

        public static Activity activity1;
        public static Activity activity2;
        public static Activity activity3;

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    // CLOSE APP METHOD
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

        public static void close()
        {
            if (App.activity3 != null) {App.activity3.finish();}
            if (App.activity2 != null) {App.activity2.finish();}
            if (App.activity1 != null) {App.activity1.finish();}
        }
}

Step 2 - in each of your activities, override the onStart() and onDestroy() methods. In onStart(), set the static variable in your App class equal to "this". In onDestroy(), set it equal to null. For example, in the "Activity1" class:

@Override
public void onStart()
{
    // RUN SUPER | REGISTER ACTIVITY AS INSTANTIATED IN APP CLASS

        super.onStart();
        App.activity1 = this;
}

@Override
public void onDestroy()
{
    // RUN SUPER | REGISTER ACTIVITY AS NULL IN APP CLASS

        super.onDestroy();
        App.activity1 = null;
}

Step 3 - When you want to close your app, simply call App.close() from anywhere. All instantiated activities will close! Since you are only closing activities and not killing the app itself (as in your examples), Android is free to take over from there and do any necessary cleanup.

Again, I don't know if this would be frowned upon for any reason. If so, I'd love to read comments on why it is and how it can be improved!

  • Interesting, I too would be interested in what other experienced Android developers thought of this. – Rudi Kershaw Feb 13 '14 at 14:20
  • Awesome answer, thanks a bunch! – Darrell Aug 20 '14 at 16:45
  • 4
    By keeping a reference to your activity you are actually leaking memory! See this for an in-depth discussion. – Managarm Oct 25 '14 at 22:47
  • @Managarm The premise behind that post is that the static variable will remain even after the process (in this case, the Activity) has been destroyed. If proper house cleaning is done though, it's a non-issue...hence the reason I nullify the reference in the activity's onDestroy() method. – Jabari Oct 26 '14 at 7:08
  • @Jabari Ah, I missed the onDestroy part. In that case it should not be an issue, though it's not best practice. – Managarm Oct 26 '14 at 11:53

I think what you are looking for is this

activity.moveTaskToBack(Boolean nonRoot);
public void quit() {
        int pid = android.os.Process.myPid();
        android.os.Process.killProcess(pid);
        System.exit(0);
    }

You can use finishAndRemoveTask () from API 21

public void finishAndRemoveTask ()

Finishes all activities in this task and removes it from the recent tasks list.

Is quitting an application frowned upon?. Go through this link. It answers your question. The system does the job of killing an application.

Suppose you have two activities A an B. You navigate from A to B. When you click back button your activity B is popped form the backstack and destroyed. Previous activity in back stack activity A takes focus.

You should leave it to the system to decide when to kill the application.

public void finish()

Call this when your activity is done and should be closed.

Suppose you have many activities. you can use Action bar. On click of home icon naviagate to MainActivity of your application. In MainActivity click back button to quit from the application.

Easy and simple way to quit from the application

Intent homeIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_MAIN);
homeIntent.addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_HOME);
homeIntent.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);
startActivity(homeIntent);

First of all, this approach requires min Api 16.

I will divide this solution to 3 parts for solve this problem more widely.

1. If you want to quit application in an Activity use this code snippet:

if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=16 && Build.VERSION.SDK_INT<21){
            finishAffinity();
        } else if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=21){
            finishAndRemoveTask();
        }

2. If you want to quit application in a non Activity class which has an access to Activity then use this code snippet:

    if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=16 && Build.VERSION.SDK_INT<21){
                getActivity().finishAffinity();
            } else if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=21){
                getActivity().finishAndRemoveTask();
            }

3. If you want to quit application in a non Activity class and cannot access to Activity such as Service i recommend you to use BroadcastReceiver. You can add this approach to all of your Activities in your project.

Create LocalBroadcastManager and BroadcastReceiver instance variables. You can replace getPackageName()+".closeapp" if you want to.

LocalBroadcastManager mLocalBroadcastManager;
BroadcastReceiver mBroadcastReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
    @Override
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
        if(intent.getAction().equals(getPackageName()+".closeapp")){
            if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=16 && Build.VERSION.SDK_INT<21){
                finishAffinity();
            } else if(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=21){
                finishAndRemoveTask();
            }
        }
    }
};

Add these to onCreate() method of Activity.

    mLocalBroadcastManager = LocalBroadcastManager.getInstance(this);
    IntentFilter mIntentFilter = new IntentFilter();
    mIntentFilter.addAction(getPackageName()+".closeapp");
    mLocalBroadcastManager.registerReceiver(mBroadcastReceiver, mIntentFilter);

Also don't forget to call unregister receiver at onDestroy() method of Activity

    mLocalBroadcastManager.unregisterReceiver(mBroadcastReceiver);

For quit application you must send broadcast using LocalBroadcastManager which i use in my PlayService class which extends Service.

  LocalBroadcastManager localBroadcastManager = LocalBroadcastManager
                                .getInstance(PlayService.this);
                        localBroadcastManager.sendBroadcast(new Intent(
                                getPackageName() + ".closeapp"));

It's not a good decision, cause it's against the Android's application processing principles. Android doesn't kill any process unless it's absolutely inevitable. This helps apps start faster, cause they're always kept in memory. So you need a very special reason to kill your application's process.

  • 4
    sign out of an application requires to really kill the app. so there should be a way to ensure app killed after signing out – anonim May 11 '12 at 0:56

This may be very late and also as per the guidelines you're not supposed to handle the life cycle process by yourself(as the os does that for you). A suggestion would be that you register a broadcast receiver in all your activities with "finish()" in their onReceive() & whenever you wish to quit you can simple pass an intent indicating that all activities must shut down..... Although make sure that you do "unregister" the receiver in your onDestroy() methods.

The correct and exact solution to quit the app on button click is using the below code:

//On Button Back pressed event

public void onBackPressed()
{ 
   moveTaskToBack(true);
   finish();
}
  • This quite the current Android component (e.g. activity), not the entire app. – Laogeodritt Jul 15 '16 at 7:20
  • This will only send the app in the background – Kumar Gaurav Oct 29 '17 at 11:45

From your top-level activity:

super.onBackPressed();

This will kill anything ;)

int p = android.os.Process.myPid();
android.os.Process.killProcess(p);

Try this

int pid = android.os.Process.myPid();
android.os.Process.killProcess(pid);

The easiest way I found to quit an application from an activity, without breaking Android's logic and without adding more code in existing activities and passing extras is the following:

public static void quitApplication (Activity currentActivity) {
    Intent intent = new Intent (currentActivity, QuitApplicationActivity.class);
    intent.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK | Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TASK | Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);

    currentActivity.startActivity (intent);
    currentActivity.finish ();
}

the QuitApplicationActivity being:

public class QuitApplicationActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate (Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate (savedInstanceState);

        finish ();
    }
}

To exit you application you can use the following:

getActivity().finish();
Process.killProcess(Process.myPid());
System.exit(1);

Also to stop the services too call the following method:

private void stopServices() {        
    final ActivityManager activityManager = SystemServices.getActivityManager(context);
    final List<ActivityManager.RunningServiceInfo> runningServices = activityManager.getRunningServices(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
    final int pid = Process.myPid();
    for (ActivityManager.RunningServiceInfo serviceInfo : runningServices) {
        if (serviceInfo.pid == pid && !SenderService.class.getName().equals(serviceInfo.service.getClassName())) {
            try {
                final Intent intent = new Intent();
                intent.setComponent(serviceInfo.service);
                context.stopService(intent);
            } catch (SecurityException e) { 
                 // handle exception
            }
        }
    }
}

you can your full apps quit. thus

Intent intent = getBaseContext().getPackageManager()
             .getLaunchIntentForPackage(getBaseContext().getPackageName());
intent .addFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_CLEAR_TOP);
startActivity(intent);

it will work 100%. Best of luck!

  • 1
    It does not seem an answer to this question! – Al-Mothafar Dec 3 '17 at 10:49

Just use finish() on back key press onKeypressed()

  • 4
    finish() will close an Activity, but will certainly not close the entire app with certainty. – 2Dee Sep 24 '15 at 13:05

Write this code in your on backpressed override method

@Override
public void onBackPressed() {
    Intent intent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_MAIN);
    intent.addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_HOME);
    intent.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
    startActivity(intent);
}

protected by Paresh Mayani Jun 26 '12 at 9:50

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.