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My docker run command :

docker run -e env1=value1 -e env2=value2 -e env3=value3 my_image_name(Ubuntu OS)

Now inside the container , I want to store these values(value1,value2 and value3) to some text file.

For that I am using printenv > dockerenv.txt inside my entrypoint script.

But this way I am getting all the other OS environment variables as well (ex- pwd,hostname etc) along with value1,value2 and value3.

I want to store only those environment variables that are passed by docker run command.

Note : - I am not sure how my varibales are going to get passed to my docker run command. It is dynamic. There could be n numbers of environment variables

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    why don't echo env1=$env1 >> dockerenv.txt; echo env2=$env2 >> dockerenv.txt; echo env3=$env3 >> dockerenv.txt ? – Alejandro Galera Aug 8 at 11:52
  • I am not sure how my varibales are going to get passed to my docker run command. It is dynamic. There could be n numbers of environment variables – Vikram Singh Aug 8 at 12:04
  • Why don't you use a naming rule ? Try to force all needed variable to begin with APPNAME_, and use a regex to filter that out. – Blusky Aug 8 at 12:31
  • Make sense. Thanks – Vikram Singh Aug 8 at 17:13
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I want to store only those environment variables that are passed by docker run command.

From inside the container, there's no way to differentiate between "environment variables set via the docker run command line" and "other environment variables". The only thing you could consider is using a specific prefix on variables you're setting via docker run:

docker run -e prefix_env1=val1 -e prefix_env2=val2 ...

Then inside the container you can use printenv | grep '^prefix_' to match only those variables.

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